PLATINUM2023

Highland Lakes Canine Rescue

... until they all have forever homes

aka Highland Lakes SPCA, HLSPCA, HLCR   |   MARBLE FALLS, TX   |  http://highlandlakescaninerescue.org

Mission

To focus on making an impact on the homeless pet population, we specialize in dogs already in shelters instead of owner surrenders. Eighty percent of our kennel population is devoted to canines with special medical and behavioral needs, and we provide individualized care to each one. We rehab and heal them, covering their medical care and preventative treatments (vaccinations, microchip, spay/neuter, flea/tick, heart worm, optimizing their health and increasing their readiness to be successfully placed with qualified families.

Ruling year info

1999

Executive Director

Brittany Osbourn

Main address

PO Box 1275

MARBLE FALLS, TX 78654 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-2923659

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As a small privately funded shelter, Highland Lakes Canine Rescue is not equipped to compete in the adoption numbers game. The big local shelters adopt out thousands of dogs annually — they are very good at getting dogs adopted. So, 4 years ago our Board studied what HLCR could do to differentiate itself from other shelters who all do basically the same thing. They identified a gap in the shelter system that HLCR could fill. Specifically, public shelters typically are not equipped to address even the minor medical and behavioral issues that make dogs difficult to adopt relatively quickly. That puts shelter staff in the position of choosing to euthanize these dogs due to space, time in shelter, and resource limitations.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

No-kill canine rescue and adoptions

In addition to working with area Animal Control Officers, we rescue dogs who are “at risk” in shelters throughout the Central Texas area. And, most importantly, we provide an exceptional collection of support facilities for our rescued dogs, including indoor kennels, large outdoor pens, agility courses, behavioral training and extensive walking trails where dogs interact daily with our staff and volunteers. Our select and dedicated group of foster families provide special, focused care in the environment of a home for our rescues who need that. We are the only area shelter that provides this level of support for every dog in our care:
-- Fully vaccinates every one of our dogs
-- Takes in AND TREATS heartworm positive dogs so they can recover and become someone’s new best friend
-- Ensures all our dogs are spayed and neutered
-- Works to ensure our dogs obtain optimum health before they are available for adoption
-- Fully reviews applicants who want to adopt our dogs to ensure both adopter and dog are a good match
-- Follows-up with adopters to help both the adopter and the dog transition successfully
-- Allows our adopted dogs to be returned to us under certain circumstances so we can work to find them more suitable homes
-- Has 24 hour onsite staff caring for our dogs

Unless a dog develops a terminal medical condition or a serious, uncorrectable behavioral issue that make it genuinely unadoptable, it stays in our shelter until finding its forever home. We strive to be the best no-kill shelter in the Hill Country.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Best Friends Society 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

No-kill canine rescue and adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

80% of the dogs we take in from other area shelters require medical or behavior interventions to make them adoptable and prevent their euthanasia. We fill a gap in the shelter system.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

No-kill canine rescue and adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

80% of the dogs we take in from other area shelters require medical or behavior interventions to make them adoptable and prevent their euthanasia. We fill a gap in the shelter system.

Number of full-time staff members per animal

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

No-kill canine rescue and adoptions

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Average number of days of shelter stay for dogs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

No-kill canine rescue and adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of dogs walked daily by our volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

No-kill canine rescue and adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Every dog in our shelter is walked daily. In inclement weather, they are all socialized by volunteers indoors.

Number of animals rehabilitated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

No-kill canine rescue and adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes surgeries, heartworm, skin and other treatable diseases, physical therapy and behavioral training

Number of animals euthanized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

No-kill canine rescue and adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These were dogs discovered to have terminal diseases after intake from other shelters.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The HLCR board made the decision that approximately 80% of the dogs we take from public shelters would have treatable medical or behavioral conditions. Our goal is to take these “Diamonds in the Ruff”, deal with their issues and provide them the opportunity to live and join their forever families.

We source our dogs from public shelters to help relieve their over-crowding. Area shelters in Central Texas know our work and contact us for help with dogs they have who typically have treatable medical or behavioral conditions. Those shelters know they would have to euthanize these dogs if we couldn’t help. Approximately 80% of the dogs HLCR takes in are, have or need
• Dental treatment
• Heart worm
• Surgeries - cyst removal, cherry eye, ACL
• Coat issues -- mange, tags and growths
• Injuries - punctures and lacerations
• Moms with puppies
• Fear or "bad" behavior (attacking cats, chickens, fence-climbing)
• Seniors
• Ear infections
• Malnourished and obese

Our Executive Director carefully selects the dogs we take in, healthy and otherwise. Before we accept a dog, she weighs the cost, potential staffing needs and estimated time required to get a dog to an adoptable level of health. We do not spend thousands of dollars on dogs needing seriously invasive operations with significant rehab requirements or on dogs that have no chance of recovery and a normal quality of life. For the most part, most of our medical or behavioral dogs are “in treatment” for less than a couple of months. During that time, we have them neutered and ensure they are current on all normal vaccines.

HLCR’s medical budget is about 10% of our overall budget. We keep costs to treat these dogs are low because we've trained our staff to address their issues rather than making vet visits. Relationships with local vets enable us to have our own medical supplies like vaccines (except for rabies), antibiotics, heart worm and parasite tests, heart worm prevention medication and the like. We use our donated agility equipment for post-injury rehabilitation and behavioral training so we don’t have to rely on vets or trainers. We manage skin problems, like demodex with our medications, baths and diet. Our staff can treat UTIs, respiratory infections and other minor illnesses, again without the cost of a visit to a vet.

And we know, for every one of these needier dogs we take from the local shelters, those shelters are likely to adopt out several dogs in the time it would take for the dog they’ve sent to us to be adopted there. if they would even keep it. Although we may not get the public credit for rescuing a larger number of dogs that are adopted from local public shelters, our shelter contacts and animal control officers let us know how grateful they are that we have taken on this mission.

We are successfully filling a gap in shelter services by taking in dogs that just need a little more. We’ve established a strong positive reputation in the Central Texas shelter community for what we do. We have staff who treat and train our dogs. We’ve offset the medical costs of treating dogs by working with our vets to acquire medications and tests that our staff administer rather than taking our dogs to vets for treatment.

We can house and treat 25-30 dogs at any given time, depending on the level of care needed. HLCR’s adoptions have run about 150 dogs per year. Our adoption rate has been at the same level or better each year even with our focus on taking dogs with treatable medical or behavioral issues.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Highland Lakes Canine Rescue
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Highland Lakes Canine Rescue

Board of directors
as of 01/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms Jeanne Gillen

Retired

Term: 2019 -

Jeanne M Gillen

Michaela Black

Jeannette Murphy

Suzanne Owens

Marta Stafford

Marta Stafford Gallery

Janelle Boutte

Jan Walters

Tammie Flack

Vickie Davis

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/4/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/15/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.