PLATINUM2023

BOY WITH A BALL

Reaching youth, transforming cities

aka Boy With a Ball Global   |   Buford, GA   |  www.boywithaball.com

Mission

Boy With a Ball betters cities by reaching at-risk youth and equipping them as leaders who turn and transform their communities.

Ruling year info

2002

Executive Director

Mr. Jamie Johnson

Main address

PO Box 748

Buford, GA 30515 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-2994124

NTEE code info

Youth Community Service Clubs (O51)

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

Economic Development (S30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our world is home to 1.8 billion young people and the youth population is growing fastest in the poorest nations. 75 million youth, globally, between 15 and 24 years of age are unemployed. Sadly, our young people are being damaged more than they are being developed and hurt more than they are being helped. As a result, hurting young people go on to hurt all of us. For all of the disconnected youth in the US, the agregate taxpayer burden is $1.56 trillion and the social cost is $4.75 trillion. Boy With a Ball transforms communities by equipping and unleashing the young people within them. We turn vulnerable youth populations from a city's problem into the solution. While disconnected, disengaged youth damage a city's future, we have found a way to turn these young people into the heroes their city needs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Love Your City Community Development Model

Boy With a Ball utilizes our internationally recognized model for transforming slums that draws in small amounts of paid staff who turn and draw together hundreds of passionate, highly-committed volunteers who team together to launch outreach activities several times a week into a city's most difficult neighborhoods. Over time of carrying out these consistent, caring and continual neighborhood walkthroughs, at-risk young people and their family members are invited into high-impact mentoring relationships and supportive small groups around common developmental needs such as job skills training, academic tutoring, ESL, parenting, scholarships, leadership and so many more.

Love Your City is now being employed by Boy With a Ball beyond Costa Rica including in Managua, Nicaragua, the Kawagware slum in Nairobi, Kenya, in Enugu, Nigeria, in the south side neighborhoods of San Antonio, Texas and in the Pittsburgh community in south Atlanta, Georgia.

Population(s) Served

Velocity is a cross-age mentoring program in which high school students in at-risk communities are trained and guided to be mentors to middle school students. Leveraging the power of developmental mentoring relationships, students cultivate connectedness, self-esteem, identity, and academic skills, enabling them to become successful students and influential leaders in their communities. Boy With A Ball (BWAB) partners with and uses a curriculum developed by Dr. Michael Karcher, a professor (University of Texas- San Antonio) and co-editor of the Handbook for Youth Mentoring, to effectively engage students in the program. BWAB is currently implementing Velocity in Berkmar High School in Gwinnett County. Funding from Wells Fargo will financially provide for the expansion of the program from 30 mentors to 60 who will be carefully selected and equipped to be matched with 60 mentees. The program will take place on Tuesday after class at Berkmar High School.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of entrance scholarships and awards and exit scholarships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Young adults

Related Program

Love Your City Community Development Model

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are moving away from scholarships in some countries and so this number will potentially move up and down in subsequent years.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults, Young adults

Related Program

Love Your City Community Development Model

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the total number of volunteer hours served across the organization.

Number of youth mentored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Young adults

Related Program

Love Your City Community Development Model

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the amount of young people mentored by BWAB staff, team members and volunteers across the globe.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adolescents, Young adults

Related Program

Love Your City Community Development Model

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Love Your City Community Development Model

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who received school supplies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Love Your City Community Development Model

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Love Your City Community Development Model

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals including expanding from our current six sites to eight cities by the mid 2017 and to expand to ten cities by mid 2018. Our additional goal is to be in every region of the world by 2020. Our goal is to scale up in the next five years to be impacting ten million people indirectly and 2 million directly.

Our goal within each city is that we would see a grassroots movement begun that would draw young people from every income level in society working together to help young people and their families living in slums developing to the point of exiting the slums and entering mainstream housing and finding gainful employment.

Boy With a Ball Global is an intermediary organization that seeks to develop young people and their familes around the world through:
-Developing innovative methodologies for positive youth, family and community development.
-Founding, equipping and supporting indigenous-led local youth, family and community development organizations.
-Weaving these local organizations into local, national and international communities of development to enhance their effectiveness.
-And by advocating for implementation of best practices in youth development in cities across the world.

Boy With a Ball Global began by developing Boy With a Ball Costa Rica, a local youth, family and community development organization in San Jose, Costa Rica and then expanded to launch local Boy With a Balls in Nicaragua and in San Antonio, Texas. As the organization grew, a separate intermediary organization, Boy With a Ball Global, was established and staffed with Boy With a Ball's founder, Jamie Johnson, a youth developer with more than twenty five years of experience in working with young people, developing youth programs and social entrepreneurship as well as a who's who of some of the organization's brightest talent developed throughout Boy With a Ball's history. Joining Jamie on the BWABG staff is Anna Currie, the former Executive Director of Boy With a Ball Costa Rica and Boy With a Ball San Antonio, Texas. Ms. Currie is the Vice President of Program Development with a specific focus on developing innovative methodologies and directing the organization's support and equipping efforts with local organizations.

Boy With a Ball Global has benefited from the last decade of building local organizations to build significant capabilities and partnerships that now have the organization poised for going to scale. BWABG partnered with the Intel Corporation to develop an online evaluation database to house the data and impact evaluation tools and data for the local organizations. Additionally, the organization began long-term partnerships with the Western Union Foundation and HP in Costa Rica in 2009. BWABG partnered with the US State Department as part of the CARSI initiative to develop a replicable model for doing community development in slums in 2011 that has included over $350,000 of funding and that has strengthened the organization's financial management systems.

BWABG's scientific advisory board includes world-reknowned experts in the world of mentoring and youth development, Dr. Michael Karcher, Dr. Jean Rhodes and Dr. Michael Nakkula as well as community development expert, Dr. Caterina Gouvis-Roman.

Boy With a Ball Global's work to have established a clear logic model and system for developing and supporting indigenous-led local youth, family and community development organizations that are transforming slums is a significant accomplishment that sets our organization up for now for scaling our work up by expanding into additional countries across the world. Here are some of the additional accomplishments that have contributed to this exciting moment in the organization's history:
-Boy With a Ball Global was awarded a third grant within the US State Department's CARSI Initiative for $150,000 in 2014.
-Volunteer hours gave over 27,468 total hours to helping young people in Africa, Latin America and the U.S.
-BWAB currently has 22 staff members worldwide.
-BWABG was named a Regional Winner at the 2012 Classy Awards in San Diego, CA.
-BWABG relocated our global headquarters to Atlanta, GA in July of 2013 in order to expand into Atlanta as well as to be situated in a regional airline hub.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

BOY WITH A BALL
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

BOY WITH A BALL

Board of directors
as of 01/23/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Mark Woodruff

Think

Term: 2012 - 2023

Mark Woodruff

Think

Caren Woodruff

Cisco

Gordon Green

Rideau Corp.

Sue Liebenthal

Family Practice

Roger Hyatt

Caprock

Ed Liebenthal

Family Practice

Chris Hyatt

Covenant Life Church

Chuck Bass

The Least, The Last, The Lost

Cheri Bass

The Least, The Last, The Lost

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/23/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/23/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.