Forgotten Children, Inc.

I fight Human Trafficking

aka Rachel's House of Healing   |   Long Beach, CA   |  www.fci-la.org

Mission

Our mission is to rescue, restore, educate and bring hope to victims of human trafficking and sexual exploitation.  Our vision is to empower and equip individuals, families and communities by breaking the cycle of sexual exploitation through partnerships and community awareness.

Ruling year info

2012

Principal Officer

Tera K Hilliard

Main address

4401 Atlantic Ave., Suite 200

Long Beach, CA 90807 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-3200194

NTEE code info

Housing Rehabilitation (L25)

Christian (X20)

Victims' Services (P62)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Washington, DC—Sex trafficking has far-reaching economic consequences for victims and society, according to a new briefing paper by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR). Research suggests that sex trafficking is widespread and increasing, and disproportionately affects women and girls; of reported cases, more than four out of five victims were female and about one-third were minors.

Like intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and stalking, human trafficking has significant economic consequences for victims. While data on the prevalence of human trafficking in the United States are scarce, due to the covert nature of the crime, some research suggests that trafficking is widespread. In 2016, the National Human Trafficking Resource Center Hotline (National Hotline) received 26,727 reports of human trafficking in the United States, resulting in 7,621 cases referred to law enforcement—a 36.7 percent increase from 2015 (National Human Trafficking Hotline 2016).

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rachels House of Healing

Rachel's House of Healing (RHH) provides residential housing and life skill training for women eighteen years of age and over. We help to women who have been trafficked into prostitution and sexually exploited. Located in San Bernardino, this is the city's only female facility and the only facility with long-term residential housing. All other shelters offer 18 months or less of housing. We have on-site staff 24-hours per day as-well-as counselors to address chemical dependency, HIV/AIDS, Anger Management, and Family Reunification. Rachel's House has the capacity to house four full time residents that can stay for up to 2years if they are clean and sober (random drug and alcohol testing determines this), and have no other place to go. Additionally, each resident must be an active participant of our four-step 180-program that addresses the mind, body, soul, and spirit.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

Drop-in and Resource Centers are a division of FCI. The goal of each center is to provide victims of human trafficking and sexual exploitation alternative options while teaching them how to become self-sufficient and independent. Our Drop-in and Resource Centers are a safe place where women who are victims of sexual exploitation can come and receive resources and information regarding their physical, mental, and emotional needs. They are welcomed into an environment where they can relax, find comfort and feel safe. We also provide hygiene products along with clothing, hot meals and resources for short-term shelter. Anyone with a desire to leave the “life” is provided with the resources necessary to assist with their decision.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

RTF is a program designed to create self-sufficiency among survivors of human trafficking and reduce the recidivism rate of returning to the "life." RTF encompasses: street outreach, diversion program for incarcerated victims, reentry/post release services, and community resources. Many of the victims are led to believe they have no valuable skills to contribute to society. The success rate of reintegration for survivors is minimal, since viable options are not available to earn a living, causing many to unwillingly return to the sex trade.Our goal is to provide all participants with the tools necessary to redirect their lives and becomecontributing members of the community. RTF is a three-phase program designed to create a learning experience and promote good work habits and basic skills which are appropriate for the workplace. The following phases are designed to ensure program completion and success:Phase 1-Intake and Assessment-Participants will work with the staff to identify skills, personalinterest, barriers and immediate needs.Phase 2-Program Implementation & Case Management-Participants will be paired with program mentors based on their interest. Case management is used to plan, implement and monitor the options and resources required to meet the participants service needs. Phase 3-Internship and Program Certification-Upon successful completion of the program, participants willreceive a certificate of completion. Staff will work with employers to secure internships and job placement.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

Street teams have been deployed to known prostitution areas such as Harbor Blvd., (Orange County), Figueroua (Los Angeles) and G Street (San Bernardino). Street teams are developed twice per month to distribute toiletries and provide support and resources. FCI also provides critical human trafficking awareness trainings and workshops to churches, law enforcement, hospital personnel, parents, educators and day care providers. Our mission is to rescue, restore, educate and bring hope to victims of human trafficking and sexual exploitation.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Families, At-risk youth

Related Program

Outreach and Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provide outreach and education to individuals, churches and the general public. We average 20 events per year, with more than 250-300 active participants.

Number of youth and families for whom a cultural inventory (e.g., cultural/ethnic identity, language, values, spiritual life, family traditions, gender and sexual identity issues, other relevant preferences, etc.) is completed and used to develop the treatment and support plan

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Road to Freedom

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Diversion education classes are provided to women currently in custody at the Lynwood County Jail for women with a his.

Number of treatment and support plans revised within specified timeframes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Rachels House of Healing

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Residents are presented with weekly goals and treatment plans. Staff are responsible for following up and setting time frames for all treatment plans.

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Rachels House of Healing

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Staff are required to attend in-service training and classes that address trauma and issues pertaining to human trafficking victims.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Forgotten Children, Inc. (FCI) provides after care and extensive support services to victims of human trafficking, sexual exploitation and violence. Our mission is to rescue, restore, educate and bring hope to victims of human trafficking and sexual exploitation.

Established in 2006, in direct response to the growing issues of human trafficking in San Bernardino, Lynwood, and the South Los Angeles community. We strive to eradicate human trafficking and the sexual exploitation of women and girls by providing comprehensive intervention and prevention services that address the mental, emotional and psychological impact caused by high-risk behaviors.

We believe education, training and raising awareness is critical in combatting this growing issue. Our prevention and intervention services include: emergency and short-term shelter, community education, reentry programs, street outreach, group therapy, and community resources. We also work with various law enforcement agencies to provide advocacy and support.

Our Drop-in and Resource Center is a safe place where women can come and receive support, resources and information regarding their physical, mental, and emotional needs. They are welcomed into an environment where they can relax, find comfort and feel safe. We also provide hygiene products along with clothing, hot meals and resources for short-term shelter. Anyone with a desire to leave the “life" is provided with the resources necessary to assist with their decision. When necessary, the center provides transportation to relocation sites or other appropriate services.

Outreach and Community Support-Street teams go out every Friday night wherever the girls are “working" to spread the love of Jesus Christ. We have volunteers that go out and distribute toiletries, resources and offer support.

Re-Entry Program Road to Freedom is an 8-week reentry diversion program designed for women incarcerated for prostitution and sexual exploitation. Participants are provided with resources, education and the tools they need to identify behaviors that caused them to become a victim of human trafficking and prostitution.

Residential Housing-Rachel's House of Healing (RHH) is a residential program for victims of human trafficking and sexual exploitation who are 18 years of age and older. Located in San Bernardino, we provide a safe place for victims to heal from their abuse and trauma. Our full-time staff and counselors provide counseling, chemical dependency education, anger management and job training. Residents are paired with mentors to assist them with setting goals, while providing emotional and mental support.

For more than 11 years, we have worked with local law enforcement, the DA's office, crisis teams, clergy, and local/national organizations to fight this growing issue. All of our staff and volunteers participate in a mandatory 40-hour training where they are provided with the tools they need to effectively serve this vulnerable population. Staff and volunteers also receive on-going training to ensure they are aware of the latest laws and trends impacting our communities.

Since our inception, we have established a safe house in San Bernardino, several street teams, a jail bag program and a resource/support center in Lynwood. We have reached more than 5,000 women through our street outreach and have provided housing to more than 100 women.

Our goal is to open a second house where we will house women and children who are victims of human trafficking. The house will target victims currently living on the streets with their children, or whose children were taken due to being on the streets.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Forgotten Children, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Forgotten Children, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 5/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sheila Campbell

Realtor

Term: 2019 - 2024

Sheila Campbell

Realtor

Ellen Reining

Attorney

Debra Benjamin

Social Worker

Gwen Hogans

Accountant

John Marcone

Business Owner

Tera Hilliard

President/CEO

Melody Ussery

Business Owner

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/18/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/22/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.