SAMARITAN WOMEN

"That any survivor, anywhere in the nation, would have access to qualified, compassionate care"

aka The Samaritan Women   |   Baltimore, MD   |  www.thesamaritanwomen.org

Mission

Guided by our faith, we advance quality care for sexually-exploited persons through: 1) Transformative residential care programs 2) Collaborative research 3) Supportive shelter mentorship Our Vision is that any survivor, anywhere in the nation, would have access to qualified, compassionate care.

Ruling year info

2013

Executive Director

Dr. Jeanne L. Allert

Main address

602 S. Chapel Gate Lane

Baltimore, MD 21229 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-3231089

NTEE code info

Residential, Custodial Care (Group Home) (P70)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The U.S. Department of Justice reports 199,000 cases of sex trafficking across the nation as of 2018. More than 100,000 children are at risk for exploitation and an untold number of adults. Survivors have much to overcome, from childhood sexual abuse, fatherlessness, poverty, neglect, substance abuse and relentless torture. The Samaritan Women invests in all those who have been trafficked and looking for a way back to the light therapeutically, academically, vocationally, socially, and spiritually. As of April 2022, there are 216 open and active shelters nationwide. Nine states have no programs at all and eight states have only one. Of the 203 open and active shelters, programs for minors 66, women with children 34, programs for boys/men 38. Our nation is woefully behind in its victim response to this problem.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Shelter Mentorship Program

Offers a 3-year training and mentorship program to establishing and support residential care programs that serve victims of domestic sex trafficking

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Conduct national industry studies on issues of importance to residential programs serving victims of domestic sex trafficking; partner with academic institutions to advance qualified research on anti-trafficking and trauma-informed victim care

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Accreditations

Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA) 2015

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of agencies trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Shelter Mentorship Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of reports written/published

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Industry Research

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Address the national deficit in services for the sexually exploited by training and mentoring start-up agencies in communities of greatest need.
2. Ensure that our vision that any survivor, anywhere in the nation, would have access to qualified and compassionate care becomes a reality for those looking to escape trafficking.
3. Impact the quality of care for survivors by investing in research and data-driven decision making for shelter providers.
4. Conduct research on effective practices to improve care within shelter programs.
5. Operate a ministry that honors God in its integrity, compassion, fearlessness, and humility.

1. We have developed a shelter planting and mentoring curriculum and work with local communities to raise up victim service options based on their needs and resources.
2. Our Institute for Shelter Care works with start-up shelter providers in a one year intensive training where they learn how to operate a shelter and care for survivors. They continue to receive mentoring and consulting services from the Institute for a subsequent two years. We do this with a focus on excellence and efficiency to maintain best practices and the highest standard of care.
3. We host two major research studies each year and up to 6 minor studies, and also partner with academic institutions nationwide to further research on human trafficking and victim care.
4. We are grounded in Christian principles and submit our plans to the Lord, trusting in His protection and provision.

With fifteen years of experience in the field of anti-trafficking and victim services field, we are leveraging what we have learned to raise up the next generation of service providers. Our agency has maintained financial health and transparency for its tenure and now teaches other nonprofits how to do the same. We created our own proprietary Care Model for serving the unique needs of exploited persons and train new shelters in this methodology. We also produce original research to further inform the field on best practices in shelter services.

* trained over 70,000 individuals on human trafficking awareness
* hosted human trafficking rallies on 13 college campuses
* trained 600+ commercial drivers on victim identification and reporting
* published two national studies on shelter operations
* hosted four national conferences of shelter programs
* served over 105 victims in our residential care programs
* developed a Care Model for victims of trafficking that is now being used as a model for other programs
* trained 13 shelter agencies in best practices (2019 - 2021) and will continue to train up to 8 agencies per year till 2024.
*migrated 140 hours of classroom instruction and over 200 digital tools, templates, policies onto a learning management system to give shelters 24/7 access to this intellectual capital and program support

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve trafficking shelters across the nation, specifically the leadership and direct care staff. We also produce national research that is used by academic institutions, shelters, and governments.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    For the shelter community, we recently surveyed them about the impact of pandemic shutdowns and how that affected their service to survivors. We do an industry survey every quarter to help shelters with business decision-making, such as the annual compensation study, how therapists are used in the shelter setting, and what security measures are important for a shelter home. We also host an annual gathering of shelter leaders to get their input on how the field is evolving and what are the most pressing needs they have.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has made a significant impact on our operations. Our community has asked us to serve in an industry leadership perspective, gathering information across the field, anticipating changes, and serving as a national spokesperson.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

SAMARITAN WOMEN
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

SAMARITAN WOMEN

Board of directors
as of 06/23/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Patricia Livingston

Howard Bank

Term: 2022 - 2023

Derrick Purcell

Ida B's Table

Patricia Livingston

Howard Bank

John Stewart

Encompass

Tom Booth

Booth Properties

Tom O'Donnell

Encompass

Bruce Hopler

Converge

Jeanne Allert

The Samaritan Women

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/23/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/23/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.