PLATINUM2023

Animal Defense League of Texas

We take them in. You take them home.

aka Animal Defense League   |   San Antonio, TX   |  www.adltexas.org

Mission

The Animal Defense League of Texas takes in rescued cats and dogs, provides medical treatment, nutrition, and shelter in a safe, live release facility until they are matched with their forever families. Through community education and empowerment, we advocate for truly responsible pet ownership. Supported by contributions and directed by a volunteer board, the League provides programs and services which strengthen the bond between animals and people. Through grassroots advocacy, education and rescue, the organization is the leading voice for dogs and cats in crisis.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Animal Defense League of Texas was incorporated on June 19, 1934. Prior to ADL's incorporation, the initiative to save animals in need had already been in action by a group called Child Protective and Humane Society. The Animal Defense League split in from this group in 1923 to dedicate itself to the prevention of cruelty to animals. ADL began with a few makeshift chicken-wire cages in response to a need to shelter stray and injured dogs and cats in the San Antonio area. Along with providing basic shelter and care, ADL has always emphasized adopting animals to homes where they will receive loving care and attention for the rest of their lives. In 1961, ADL moved to its present location in northeast San Antonio. Its' campus encompasses more than 12 acres and includes a two-acre pet park. On the property is an Adoption Center and a 5,000 square-foot veterinary hospital that provides onsite spay/neuter surgeries, non-routine surgeries, and ongoing medical care for all ADL residents.

Ruling year info

1947

Interim CEO

Mr. Mike Bennett

Main address

11300 Nacogdoches Road

San Antonio, TX 78217 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-6002033

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Animal Defense League of Texas is a true no-kill shelter for abandoned, abused, or neglected dogs and cats. Our mission is to enhance the quality of life for these animals by providing needed medical care, including spaying and neutering. Food, shelter, and safety are also provided – along with compassion and attention. While maintaining a healthy and loving facility, ADL consistently works to find the best possible home for each resident animal.
The San Antonio community is estimated to have more than 150,000 strays, and Bexar county (wherein lies San Antonio) is estimated to have more than 860,000 stray animals. In San Antonio and the surrounding area the stray animal population is a major issue. Animal Defense League of Texas is on a mission to help fix this problem and educate the public about proper pet care through spay and neuter programs, low-cost wellness and vaccination programs, and more.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Volunteer Program

ADL is very grateful for its legion of volunteers!  The shelter could not operate as efficiently without them. 

Potential volunteers attend an orientation meeting, where policies are explained and an overview of the shelter is given.  The resident trainer teaches a short class in appropriate techniques of dog walking.  Volunteers are given myriad opportunities that includes all areas of the shelter, from mobile adoption events to pet therapy and dog walking. 

The $30 orientation fee covers the cost of handouts and an ADL volunteer tee shirt, along with any incidental expenses incurred by the program.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our foster program is key to the success of saving as many furry lives as we can. Moving animals into foster homes not only makes their lives better, it also saves the lives of those who take their place.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We're committed to educating the community about being responsible pet owners and proper pet care. We encourage any school to schedule a humane education program with the Animal Defense League of Texas.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Animal Defense League of Texas and San Antonio Animal Care Services host a pet vaccination and microchip event twice a month. All services are free for San Antonio residents with proof of residency. These events are hosted in targeted neighborhoods that have historically been under-sourced for veterinary services as we aim to ensure the pets in our communities are receiving the essential care for a happy, healthy life.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Seniors for Seniors program places senior cats and dogs (typically over 7 years of age) with senior citizens who are 60 years of age or older, allowing participants to discover the joys of having a cat or dog in their lives.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status, Domestic workers, Military personnel, Retired people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number reflects the number of first-time donors in that year. ADL saw huge growth in new donors in large part due to the response to Hurricane Harvey.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number reflects the amount of total donors who gave greater than $0 that year. This growth in overall donors is due in large part to the response to Hurricane Harvey.

Average number of days of shelter stay for animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total intake for the year.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. ADL's goal is to be the most effective, creative and impactful shelter in San Antonio, fully contributing to a sustainable future as a no-kill city.
2. Embrace the importance of the pet/human bond offering alternatives to pet surrender through accessible training support and veterinary services.
3. Eliminate the cycle of pet overpopulation through education on all levels.
4. Develop unique partnerships to increase our effectiveness as a shelter.

1. In 2018 ADL's goal is rescue and find homes for 5,900 homeless, abandoned and abused cats and dogs in our community. Nearly 5,000 of those pets will be rescued directly from the City of San Antonio's Animal Care Services and placed in our Community Shelter Kennels and Puppy Building, built specifically to rescue and house more dogs from ACS' euthanasia lists.

2. ADL will offer low-cost Wellness Clinics to provide low-cost vaccinations and basic pet care to the public to increase pet retention and decrease pet abandonment.

3. ADL will continue to develop key partnerships to increase adoptions in 2018 to 5,900.

4. ADL will continue to run a second permanent adoption location in 2018 - the Paul Jolly Center for Pet Adoptions - to increase adoptions and public access to our pets.

5. ADL will continue to strengthen our relationships with the staff at Animal Care Services to maintain our designation as one of the largest high-volume pet partners. This will be achieved through increased communication about specific pet needs, increased pick-up visits and by maintaining experienced Animal Defense League staff who are connected and informed about the rescue process and needs at Animal Care Services.

6. ADL will continue to support our trainer and the training programs for both our shelter residents and owned pets. The training provided for shelter pets increases their adoptability and provides the best shelter environment possible, based on each pet's individual needs. Access to a professional trainer for pet owners, both ADL adopters and the public, provides low-cost or free assistance to help increase pet retention, assist with problem/resolution and provides the owner an alternative to pet surrender or abandonment.

7. ADL will develop creative volunteer and foster programs that allow our volunteers to have more impact on our rescued pets and their adoptability.

8. Participate in humane education partnerships and programs both on and off campus.

ADL has a dedicated, focused team that continually strategizes on resource use, partnerships, community impact and sustainability, that includes our Board of Directors, staff, and volunteers.

We have made significant strides to increase adoptions and rescue more homeless pets in 2018 by increasing key partnerships. We will continue to develop resources and creative partnering to make an even larger imprint on community impact and sustain San Antonio's future as a "no-kill" city.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Animal Defense League of Texas
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Animal Defense League of Texas

Board of directors
as of 08/14/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Alan Hepp

James D. Odell

James D. Odell CPA

Alan Hepp

Valero Energy Corp

Amber Ramsey

Ramsey Law

Bodo Knochenauer

Wells Fargo

Gretchen Garceau-Kragh

Cece Given

Pamela McCray

Victoria Beavers

Linda Mora

Martha Mitchell

Mari Baker

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/30/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/02/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.