CATHOLIC CHARITIES OF FT WORTH INC

Ending Poverty One Family at a Time

aka Catholic Charities Fort Worth   |   Fort Worth, TX   |  CatholicCharitiesFortWorth.org

Mission

To provide service to those in need, to advocate for compassion and justice in the structures of society, and to call all people of goodwill to do the same.

Ruling year info

2021

Board Chair

Deb McNamara

Main address

P.O. Box 15610

Fort Worth, TX 76119 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-0808769

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CCFW works to address poverty with a focus on five key areas of impact: – Education: Less than 39% of Texas adults have an associate degree or higher. Completion rates are particularly low among low-income students, who face a variety of non-academic barriers beyond financial and academic concerns. – Emotional Resiliency: The trauma and chronic stress of poverty severely limit important decision-making skills such as the ability to cope with stress/adversity and the ability to plan. – Employment: The job-search process is time-intensive, daunting, and requires specific resources and skillsets. – Financial Resiliency: Employment and stable income are not enough to protect a family from financial hardship – 37% of adults in 2019 reported they would be unable to cover an unexpected expense of $400. – Resource Stability: Research shows that even employed individuals and families often struggle to meet their basic needs – housing, transportation, childcare, etc.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Case Management

The program serves to provide integrated service delivery of employment services, income supports and financial coaching to low income families in order to successfully move those families towards financial independence

Population(s) Served
Adults

To continue the mission of Catholic Charities Fort Worth in providing dental care for those patients who qualify for services at discounted fees.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The purpose of this program is to increase community college persistence and graduation rates by providing low-income, new-to-college students with comprehensive social and financial support services to help them stay in school and overcome barriers to college completion

Population(s) Served
Adults

To provide individuals with the resources, support and educational opportunities they need to advance their careers and secure living wage employment.

Population(s) Served
Adults

To provide quality immigration legal services to immigrants and their families.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

To provide transportation to individuals to enhance self-sufficiency and as a tool to end poverty.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

To promote cultural adjustment and self-sufficiency in refugee communities

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

Accreditations

Praesidium 2018

Affiliations & memberships

Catholic Charities USA 1910

United Way Member Agency 1929

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 1998

Praesidium 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

# of rides provided by CCFW Transportation Services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Transportation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

# of individuals who received financial assistance through our relief services to address an urgent and pressing need

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

# of students who earned an education credential

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

# of individuals who obtained new employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

# of individuals who improve their financial actuals (i.e. earnings, savings, and/or debt)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

# of Dental Clinic appointments provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

# of individuals served by Immigration Services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our agency’s overarching goal is to serve 10,000 families on a pathway out of poverty by 2026.

Each Pathway has a unique goal/client outcome:
– Education: Achieving educational credentials that increase earning potential and employment opportunities
– Emotional Resiliency: Developing emotional resiliency – the ability to cope with stress and adversity and the ability to plan
– Employment: Securing employment that provides sufficient income
– Financial Resiliency: Developing financial resiliency – the ability to absorb unexpected financial shocks and crises
– Resource: Solving chronic resource-related barriers (housing, transportation, childcare, food, etc.) and/or providing short-term resource relief and resource connection that helps bridge a temporary gap in basic needs

Within each Pathway, programs measure client outcomes that are tailored to the specific service each program provides. For example, a Financial Resiliency Pathway program will include outcomes such as “increased savings” while our Education Pathway programs track the number of clients who graduate with a post-secondary credential.

By Pathway, our strategies include:

– Education: College persistence programs that pair low-income/nontraditional college students with a personal Navigator who helps them pursue goals and remove barriers to success.

– Emotional Resiliency: Clinically-informed coaching techniques, including motivational interviewing and modeling, to help clients develop problem solving skills, decrease reactivity, increase their sense of self-efficacy, and work on other indicators associated with the ability to cope and the ability to plan.

– Employment: Career development and job readiness programs that help clients navigate the job search process and prepare via resume building, interview prep, and application assistance.

– Financial Resiliency: Financial coaching that gives clients the tools and tactics necessary to build a strong personal safety net and work toward their unique long-term goals.

– Resource: Resource connection and temporary financial assistance to help clients address an urgent/pressing need and leverage available community resources. (Resource connection is integrated with service planning within long-term case management programs.)

We know our role and impact:
Our programs and services are uniquely positioned to help address a variety of key factors that keep families in poverty. As mentioned above, we have identified five main areas in which we have an impact: Education, Employment, Emotional Resiliency, Financial Resiliency, and Resource Stability. These are our Out of Poverty Pathways, forming a multidimensional, research-based framework that clarifies our own role as well as deepens our understanding of poverty as a complex, interconnected system.

We are invested in research and evaluation:
We are committed to continuous learning, drawing on the most current research and ideas in social work, behavioral economics, and other fields.

Our Research and Evaluation department facilitates and tests experimental solutions using a variety of evaluation methods. In addition, we have partnered with the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities at the University of Notre Dame to conduct randomized control trials (RCTs) that assess our long-term case management model as well as our college persistence program, Stay the Course® (STC).

We are person-centered, holistic and relationship-based:
Poverty looks different for everyone. We treat every person we serve with dignity and respect, letting their individual experiences, needs, goals, and strengths guide our services. As much as possible, our programs work to holistically assess and meet a client’s needs, understanding the interconnected nature of many barriers.

Recent agency accomplishments include:

– We became the #1 referral source for those calling 2-1-1 for help due to COVID-19.
– We have almost fully transitioned our programs to our new Out of Poverty Pathways framework, which has allowed us to increase our evaluation readiness and lay the groundwork for developmental program evaluation.
– Two years in, the Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) for our premiere long-term case management program, Padua, revealed promising results in support of the program’s impact. Our partners at the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities found, after 24 months, real improvements in self-sufficiency and labor market outcomes for Padua participants, including:
– Padua participants were 25% more likely to have full-time employment than the control group.
– Monthly earnings for Padua participants were 18% higher after 2 years, compared with the control group.
– As for self-reported health, 43% of Padua participants reported improved health after two years.
– We were recently recognized as one of Fort Worth's Best Places for Working Parents® in recognition of our family-friendly practices that help our employees and our organization thrive.

Financials

CATHOLIC CHARITIES OF FT WORTH INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CATHOLIC CHARITIES OF FT WORTH INC

Board of directors
as of 4/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Deb McNamara

No Affiliation

Term: 2021 - 2022

Deb McNamara

Pat Svacina

Butch Bercher

Caroline Cooley

Father Jack McKone

Melissa Rankin

Murphy Markham

Jane Schoomaker

Allison Rix

George Tamer

Beth Kwasny

James Meintjes

Sunnie Sellers

Aaron Munoz

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/25/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/16/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.