Junior Achievement of the Chisholm Trail, Inc.

To inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.

aka Junior Achievement of the Chisholm Trail   |   Fort Worth, TX   |  www.jafortworth.org

Mission

We are the passionate people behind a movement that seeks to educate and inspire young people to value free enterprise, business and economics to improve the quality of their lives.

Ruling year info

1994

President

Mrs. Cindy Hames

Main address

Junior Achievement of The Chisholm Trail, Inc 6300 Ridglea Pl, Ste 400

Fort Worth, TX 76116 USA

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EIN

75-0944915

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

No matter the economic climate, we need to educate our youth on the importance of being financially responsible, well-educated, contributing members of our community. JA programs provide the experiences that prepare young people for the real world by showing them how to generate wealth and effectively manage it, how to create jobs that make communities more robust, and how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to the workplace. The result of JA programs is to prepare students for college and the workforce, provide financial literacy skills, stress the importance of staying in school, provide awareness of career opportunities, provide positive role models and mentors for students, and instill confidence in the students’ ability to succeed.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

JA Financial Literacy Pathway

Junior Achievement is part of the solution, laying the foundation for greater economic stability across all communities and fulfilling the promise of economic independence for today’s youth. JA’s scalable, hands-on programs give K–12 students the opportunity to improve their financial capability, understand the importance of staying in school, and expand their vision for their future.

Population(s) Served

Junior Achievement is part of the solution—instilling an entrepreneurial mindset and providing a launch pad for tomorrow’s brightest innovators. JA’s hands-on entrepreneurship programs expose youth to business concepts—helping them understand that start-ups are a viable career option, and providing opportunities to run their own businesses, work as part of a team, and be guided by real-world mentors, including local entrepreneurs and business professionals.

Population(s) Served

Junior Achievement is part of the solution—enabling students with career planning skills, providing opportunities for career exploration and development of transferable soft skills, and encourage students to pursue careers they might not have otherwise considered. JA’s community and volunteer based partnerships validate key skills and knowledge needed in the future workforce.

Population(s) Served

The JA Company Program provides the opportunity for high school students to start and operate a small business throughout the school year. This program was the founding program of JA 100 years ago and has been modernized to be an in-depth, 21st century entrepreneurial experience for students, blending technology with classroom education. High school students form a company, raise capital, decide on a product or service (that also has a positive social impact), produce and market the product or service while managing all aspects of the company including human resources, marketing, production, and finance.

Population(s) Served

JA Finance Park Virtual uses hands-on classroom activities and virtual experiences to build a foundation for making intelligent, lifelong personal finance decisions. Specifically, participating students will be able to identify personal interests, skills, work preferences and values, identify career interests, evaluate the risks and benefits of saving and investing, evaluate risk and recognize insurance as a way to minimize such risk, define taxes, their purpose and how they affect citizens and the marketplace, explain budgeting and identify components of a successful budget. All of these aspects result in the creation of a successful budget using hypothetical life situations.

Population(s) Served

The Reverse JA Day Program, developed by JA of the Chisholm Trail, is an in-depth entrepreneurship experience for students. It differs from JA's traditional program delivery model by taking students into the workplace to deliver the JA programs as opposed to in the classroom. While students still receive the JA curriculum, just as in the traditional model, they also witness how JA concepts are applied and put into action at the volunteer host company. Students engage with the business environment and culture while learning about the many jobs and careers available at the company. For students coming from low-income backgrounds, this may be their first exposure to a world outside their neighborhood and a realization that they could potentially work for their host company or other companies for which they have not previously been exposed.

Population(s) Served

Grade appropriate curriculum focused on JA's three pathways (financial literacy, work and career readiness and entrepreneurship) is delivered by community volunteers in the classroom during one school day.

Population(s) Served

Grade appropriate curriculum focused on JA's three pathways (financial literacy, work and career readiness and entrepreneurship) is delivered by community volunteers during several weekly classroom sessions. Typically, the volunteer delivers JA curriculum over a period of 5-8 weeks.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total dollar amount of scholarship awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The total lifetime scholarship dollars distributed is $1,360,825.

Number of students impacted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Upon executing the "Inspire Your Future Workforce" initiative, there was a decrease in student impact volume which correlates to fewer students participating in the new intensive Reverse JAID program.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Junior Achievement is the oldest and largest youth-serving organization in the world whose mission is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. Our goal is to provide programs that teach students in kindergarten through 12th grade, skills for the future by preparing them for workforce and college readiness, financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and dropout prevention. Hand in hand with caring adults concerned about the future success and economic health of young people and the communities in which they live, JA volunteers take the message of opportunity and economic understanding to classrooms in the community.

Junior Achievement uses a traditional delivery method in elementary and some secondary classrooms where business volunteers teach the JA curriculum on campus during the school day. Programs that will be implemented as a result of funding can include classes from the following JA Program curriculum. While maintaining our traditional delivery method in elementary and some secondary classrooms where business volunteers teach the JA program on campus during the school day, the initiative provides different strategies to meet the specific needs of middle and high school students.

This initiative focuses on increasing impact and educational relevance at the middle and high school level, the point where programs have the greatest impact on students.

“Inspire Your Future Workforce” is designed to take JA’s middle and high school programs and deliver the programs in non-traditional settings to add relevance to the programs and programs is to prepare students for college and the workforce,

Available for every grade level in the full K-12 spectrum, JA’s programs have been created by world-class experts in the education realm, approved by school systems throughout the world for their alignment with core concepts (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills – TEKS in our state) and the focus on education at each grade level, and reviewed and approved by representatives of the business community and others to ensure a fair and balanced educational experience. In addition to outstanding program content, a significant point of differentiation is that Junior Achievement requires that a community business volunteer become a presenter of our curriculum. Our staff recruits and trains over 1,500 business volunteers each year to teach our programs to 25,000 students in the Tarrant County area. These volunteers use the Junior Achievement curriculum along with personal and professional experiences to help students understand the free enterprise system and the world of work.

In 1956, Junior Achievement opened their first office in Tarrant County with a mission of teaching young people how to run a business through the original JA Company Program. 60 years later JA of the Chisholm Trail has partnered with hundreds of businesses, thousands of volunteers, and empowered over half a million students to be prepared for their future. In April of 2015, Junior Achievement of the Chisholm Trail in Fort Worth launched its “Inspire” Campaign. The campaign, which was the outcome of the three-year planning process, is designed to increase the volunteer involvement in Junior Achievement’s programs through new programs and delivery options. Mayor Betsy Price announced the campaign and discussed the importance of a strong workforce in continuing the economic growth of the region. She also stressed the role that organizations like JA play in exposing young people to careers, preparing them for success in work and life, and providing a strong workforce.

Financials

Junior Achievement of the Chisholm Trail, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Junior Achievement of the Chisholm Trail, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/28/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

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