PLATINUM2024

Cancer Care Services

Help = Hope

Fort Worth, TX   |  www.cancercareservices.org

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Mission

Cancer Care Services supports cancer patients, cares for caregivers, and empowers survivors to reduce the impact of cancer in Tarrant County.

Notes from the nonprofit

Cancer Care Services serves all cancer types, all ages, all ethnicities, and income levels (In 2023, 79% of our clients were considered very low, low, or moderate income, and 39% were racial minorities). Our comprehensive, wrap-around services for patients, survivors, and caregivers provide relief from the fear and chaos of cancer, while reducing trauma and distress. Cancer Care Services is unique, relevant, innovative, responsive, equitable, and inclusive. We are devoted to reducing the financial distress related to the cost of cancer treatment. Our Financial Assistance program includes health insurance premiums, medication copays, transportation assistance, nutritional supplements, and emergency funds. Additionally, we offer financial navigation which, according to a new study published by the National Cancer Institute, adds to the evidence that programs aimed at reducing the financial burden of cancer treatment can save money and improve the quality of life of people with cancer.

Ruling year info

1965

President & CEO

Mrs. Melanie S. Wilson

Main address

623 South Henderson Street

Fort Worth, TX 76104 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Fort Worth Cancer Society

EIN

75-1025511

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Health Support Services (E60)

Cancer (G30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Cancer Care Services supports cancer patients, cares for caregivers, and empowers survivors to reduce the impact of cancer in Tarrant County. Cancer Care serves around 3,500 people annually by providing personalized support and resources to improve quality of life and address the social determinants of health for those impacted by cancer. We serve all cancer types and all ages. Our expansive, wrap-around services for patients, survivors, and their caregivers provide relief from the fear & chaos of cancer. •Cancer is the leading cause of death in Tarrant County (the 15th largest county in the US). •Cancer will affect 1 in 2 men and 1 in 3 women in their lifetime. Tarrant County’s population is more than 2 million, so more than 800,000 people are expected to develop cancer. •While cancer affects people of every income level and background, the economically disadvantaged have lower survival rates for all cancers combined.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

HELP = HOPE

Cancer Care Services HELP = HOPE program is provided to clients at no cost, and addresses the Centers for Disease Controls Social Determinants of Health for cancer patients, survivors and caregivers by providing: 1) economic stability through financial navigation and assistance, 2) education through knowledge-building workshops and activities, 3) neighborhood and built environment through transportation and nutrition assistance, 4) health and healthcare through health insurance and medication assistance - plus mental health services like counseling, and 5) social and community context through psychosocial activities and navigation. We are also focused on reducing health disparities by providing community outreach in underserved neighborhoods across Tarrant County. Our two community outreach coordinators are both former clients who are now empowered cancer survivors.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Caregivers

Where we work

Awards

Non Profit Employer of the Year 2003

Fort Worth Star Telegram and Fort Worth Rotary Club

Neighborhood Builder Award 2007

Bank of America

Best Companies to Work For 2019

Fort Worth Inc.

Best Companies to Work For 2020

Fort Worth Inc.

Best Companies to Work For 2021

Fort Worth Inc.

Organization of the Year 2021

Dallas Fort Worth Community Health Workers Association

1 of the 50 Best Nonprofits to Work For in the U.S. 2021

Nonprofit Times Magazine

Best Place for Working Parents Designation 2021

Best Place for Working Parents

Best Place for Working Parents Designation 2022

Best Place for Working Parents

Best Companies to Work For 2022

Fort Worth Inc.

Best Place for Working Parents Designation 2023

Best Place for Working Parents

Best Companies to Work For 2022

Fort Worth Inc.

Best Place for Working Parents Designation 2024

Best Place for Working Parents

Affiliations & memberships

United Way Member Agency

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

HELP = HOPE

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

HELP = HOPE

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Even with COVID restricting client work in person, we continued to see a large volume of clients.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with diseases and illnesses

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are proud of our community partnerships which help expand the reach of our programs and services.

Percentage of evaluated clients who self-report improvement in quality of life and well-being following services/interventions.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

HELP = HOPE

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

HELP = HOPE

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

HELP = HOPE

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100% Board participation

Number of new programs/program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

HELP = HOPE

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We added "Powerful Tools for Caregivers" an evidenced-based 6 week program to support those in a caregiving role. We added an outreach free cancer screening program in underserved areas.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health

Related Program

HELP = HOPE

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Cancer Care Services served a total of 3535 clients in 2022.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Outcomes/Impact
Rates of major depressive disorder are thought to be up to three times higher in cancer patients than in the general population, and depression in caregivers is often equal to or higher than depression in cancer patients.
Outcomes/Impact Continued
According to the National Cancer Institute, “Data suggests that cancer patients can develop a sense of helplessness or hopelessness when stress becomes overwhelming. This response is associated with higher rates of death.” Evidence from experimental studies also suggests that psychological stress can affect a tumor’s ability to grow and spread. This is why screening for distress is a recommendation of the patient-centered standards from the American College of Surgeon’s Commission on Cancer.
1. Our first outcome goal utilizes CancerSupportSource’s nationally-recognized and evidence-based Distress Screening Tool to measure a client’s reduction in distress 30 days after receiving our services. The goal is for 50% of clients surveyed to experience a reduction in distress by 10% or more. Data collected between January – December showed that 99% of clients decreased distress by at least 10%.
2. Our second outcome goal is to measure a reduction in distress by collecting stress-reduction data from clients who receive resource & referral services &/or who participate in our psychosocial programs. Between January and December 2022, 99% of the 5,285 individuals surveyed reported a reduced level of distress.

Cancer Care Services’ professional Cancer Advocates (social workers) walk side-by-side with cancer patients, survivors, and their loved ones during their entire journey in order to reduce cancer’s impact on their financial, emotional, and day-to-day well-being. "Social workers are just as important in the treatment of cancer as chemotherapy," says Dr. Lawrence Shulman, professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. “Social workers are trained to help patients and their families cope with the physical, emotional, and social disruptions of cancer in ways that physicians cannot.” According to Timothy Mullett, MD, MBA, medical director of the Markey Cancer Center Research Network, “Social workers have the expertise to identify and overcome roadblocks that can interfere with treatment outcomes.”

Our Cancer Advocates address the multifaceted challenges cancer brings, from diagnoses onward. We give HELP & HOPE through personalized care and advocacy to help clients overcome system barriers, strengthen coping skills, address mental health needs, reduce distress, and minimize financial trauma BY:
 Decreasing distress through addressing mental health concerns like feelings of helplessness, fear, and anxiety; marital and family tension; and grief through our counseling services (all ages are served, including children);
 Removing barriers, like the inability to pay for health insurance, through our financial assistance program which includes: health insurance assistance, medication copays, transportation assistance, and emergency funds;
 Improving adherence to cancer treatment plans through guiding patients, and their loved ones, through the complex healthcare maze -including helping with practical and financial concerns. For example, funds raised through this campaign enabled us to hire a Financial Navigator to assist patients with insurance, billing, and other cancer-related financial issues. We also provide nutritional support through dietitians and nutritional supplements;
 Reducing social isolation by creating peer connection and companionship through social support; strengthening each client’s circle of support, and providing caregiver education and support; and…
 Imparting knowledge about pertinent topics intended to strengthen clients’ self-sufficiency and well-being.

Since 1946, Cancer Care Services has been supporting cancer patients, caring for caregivers, and empowering survivors to reduce the impact of cancer in Tarrant County. Cancer Care serves around 3,500 people annually by providing holistic, personalized support and resources to improve quality of life, reduce stress, and address the social determinants of health. We serve all cancer types, all ages, all ethnicities, and income levels (In 2021, 79% of our clients were considered very low to low income, and 34% were considered minority ethnicity). Our expansive, wrap-around services for patients, survivors, and their caregivers provide relief from the fear & chaos of cancer – while reducing trauma and distress. And because cancer shouldn’t devastate one’s finances, 100% of our programs are free. Cancer Care employs 35 passionate and professional staff, with 19% of those having 5-10 years of service to the agency. Cancer Care Services is unique, relevant, innovative, responsive, equitable, and inclusive.

COVID has had a deadly impact on cancer due to a decline in screenings, and therefore diagnoses. “The true incidence of these cancers did not drop. The decline clearly represents a delay in making the diagnoses, and delays matter with cancer,” said Dr. Craig Bunnell, Chief Medical Officer of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. “Late diagnosis of cancers is an incredibly worrying side-effect of the pandemic where the impact may be felt for several years. “The delay in diagnosis will likely lead to presentation at more advanced stages and poorer clinical outcomes.”

In addition to the pandemic’s adverse impact on cancer screenings, inflation has risen at the fastest pace in 40 years in 2022. We responded quickly to the pandemic and recession in 2020 by creating a COVID Emergency Fund to ensure clients’ life-sustaining needs are met, like shelter and food. We dispersed $81,000+ in COVID Emergency Funds in 2020, and distributed $266,785 in direct financial assistance in 2021 for impoverished clients–including COVID Emergency Funds. Sadly, pandemic-related trauma persists in 2022, so these emergency funds remain available in addition to our standard financial assistance programs. Since the pandemic, clients have required significantly more resource assistance and time from staff due to the extraordinary physical, economic, and mental health strains on their lives– so we continue meeting much more complex needs, including working with more patients with late-stage cancer.

Since 2020, Cancer Care has had to overcome the complex challenges of maintaining uninterrupted services for clients while also trying to raise revenue in a volatile and barren fundraising climate. Yet even though fundraising has suffered, we have expanded both services and staff. Cancer impacts nearly everyone in some capacity, so our mission to reduce the impact of cancer is vital.

Cancer Care is debt-free and has earned the Platinum Seal from Guidestar. In 2021, we were named Organization of the Year by the Dallas Fort Worth Community Health Workers Association, & selected as 1 of the 50 Best Nonprofits to Work For in the U.S. by the Nonprofit Times. We were named one of the Best Companies to Work For in Fort Worth in 2019, 2020 & 2021 by Fort Worth Inc. Magazine. We were named a Best Place for Working Parents in 2021 & 2022.


How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Cancer Care Services
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Cancer Care Services

Board of directors
as of 02/07/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Joseph Austin

Kelly Hart Attorneys at Law

Term: 2024 - 2025

Jesse Booher

Alexander Booher & Assoc.

Joseph Austin

Kelly Hart

Cameron Brown

Cook Children's - Staff Care Chaplain/ Fort Worth Fire Department - Cancer Focus Group Facilitator/ TCU - Professor

Mike Crum

City of Fort Worth

Jackie Gibbons

Community Volunteer

Heidi Hardy

Arlington YMCA

Deloris Hummel

Bank of Texas

Audie Kuhn

TCU Advancement

Amy Luskey

Personal Trainer

Ann Ochs

Medical Oncologist

Jane Oderberg

HSC - Geriatrics

Norma Salinas

Southside Bank

Louann Schulze

Retired - TCC

Cathy Trinh

Tarrant County College

Tonya Veasey

Congressional Black Caucus Foundation

Jennifer Ellison

Ellison Event Production

Marcus Hicks

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Tarrant County

Ty McKinney

CFO Heim Barbecue

Jodye Newton

Fort Worth Report

Rachel Theriault, MD

Medical Oncologist

Cindy Coffin

Community Volunteer

Bill Fairley

Owner of Financial Planning Firm

Cristal Galvan

Hernandez Grants & Consulting

Scott Morikawa

Lead Associate & Analyst, CME Consultants & IT Consultant, Aloha Integrity

Jodye Newton

Director of Corporate & Community Relations, Fort Worth Report

Carlos Valencia, DMin

Faith Community Health Coordinator, Baylor Scott & White & Senior Pastor at Iglesia Victoria en Cristo

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/7/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/09/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.