Clayton Child Care, Inc.

Preparing Children to Lead Great Lives!

aka Clayton Youth Enrichment, Clayton YES!   |   Fort Worth, TX   |  http://www.claytonyouth.org

Mission

The mission of Clayton Youth Enrichment is to serve communities of North Texas by providing quality programs that foster the emotional, social, and educational development of children, youth, and families. Our goal is to prepare children to live great lives.

Notes from the nonprofit

Our Annual Reports are available on our website at www.claytonyouth.org.

Ruling year info

1976

CEO

Mr. Jason Ray

Main address

600 Griggs Ave.

Fort Worth, TX 76103 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-1485951

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Youth Centers, Clubs, (includes Boys/Girls Clubs)- Multipurpose (O20)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

After-school programs are essential for the working parents of Texas and their employers. Families rely on after-school programs to keep kids safe, boost student success, and help parents keep their jobs. However, parents in low-to-moderate income neighborhoods are often unable to find safe, affordable care for their children. More than 1.5 million Texas children would attend an after-school program if one was available - and almost a million children go home everyday to an empty apartment or house after school. Quality after-school programs have been shown to decrease juvenile crime and risky behavior in the after school hours, increase student academic achievement, and provide parents with peace of mind that allows them to focus on their work while knowing their child is safe.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Enrichment Services

Clayton provides on-site care for school-age youth in more than 80 Tarrant County schools. We typically serve 7,000 children and youth annually with daily after-school and summer programs. Our programs focus on providing a fun, safe, and secure environment for youth during their out-of-school time. Our goal is to maintain a 1:14 staff/student ratio. Our programs are built on a social emotional learning framework that prepares kids to live great lives. Our staff are trained in trauma-aware behavioral management, social emotional health, quality improvement, conflict resolution, and diversity and national quality standards for school-age programs. We provide full day programs during most teacher in-service days, breaks and holidays. A full day program is also offered during summer break.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

In 2016, Clayton's board committed to making our after-school programs into social and emotional learning (SEL) communities. Based on the model developed by the highly respected Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), Clayton's after-school programs lay a strong foundation for personal and academic success by creating engaging after-school enrichment programs that support the development of strong social and emotional skills.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children served in our programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Youth Enrichment Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is the total number of children served in our after-school, pre-school and nonprofit childcare programs. Academic year 20/21 reflects limited program capacity due to COVID safety protocols.

Percentage of children scoring in or above the typical range for their age on DESSA

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Social and Emotional Learning in After-School

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partial data for 2020. In 2019, students showed strong gains in social and emotional skills as measured by the DESSA with 7% moving up to age typical and a 11% increase in students rated as strong.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Clayton is committed to offering a fun, safe, and nurturing environment where kids can learn and grow while their parents finish their workday.

Clayton staff is dedicated to preparing children to lead great lives. This means evolving to meet the diverse needs of our students and their families. To that end, Clayton recently launched a new initiative focused on developing stronger social and emotional learning skills in our students and staff. The goal of the Social and Emotional Learning Initiative is to prepare students for personal success by teaching and modeling the skills that teachers, parents and principals have identified as most needed in their schools. These include: self-management; self-awareness; responsible decision-making; social awareness and interpersonal/relationship skills.

It is our belief that a strong foundation of healthy social and emotional skills will allow children to grow up to be responsible and productive members of our communities.

After-school is an ideal place to learn and practice interpersonal and leadership skills. With less structure than the school day, students in after-school programs have more time to interact with their peers. Whether students are working on a robot, playing a board game or planning a community service project, each decision or conversation is an opportunity to practice being together in healthy relationships and , practice self-management.

Children must see the adult role models in their life practicing these skills as well. In addition to utilizing research-based social and emotional learning curriculum, Clayton staff is trained to model the behaviors and to embed learning and practice into every activity and into the culture of the after-school program. Regular program evaluation will use proven assessments to both qualitatively and quantitatively measure improvement in individual students social and emotional skills as well as program environment.

As a nonprofit provider of licensed child care for over 45 years, Clayton has the staff and infrastructure to support our programs and the implementation of the Social and Emotional Learning Initiative. With around 7,000 students served annually pre-pandemic, our site staff has proven their ability to provide high-quality programming every day after school and over the summer.

In addition to developing our existing staff and hiring others with the knowledge and experience run our programs and to lead implementation of the Social and Emotional Learning Initiative, Clayton has developed many solid partnerships in our 40 years of serving the families of Tarrant County. These partners bring their expertise to enhance our staff training, program development and evaluation capabilities.

Clayton has a solid record of providing engaging, high- quality after-school programs in our community. In fact, for several years now we have had the joy of welcoming second and third generation "Clayton Kids" into our after school community - we must be doing a lot of things right! But the needs of families in our community are always changing, so we have, over our 40 years, added more formal evaluation systems to help guide our progress. The increases in our student's positive behaviors and attendance have been modest, but statistically significant. We know that after-school programs are part of a larger education picture and Clayton's leadership believes that helping children to gain social and emotional skills that they will use throughout their life is an ideal fit for the after-school environment. We look forward to fully integrating our Social and Emotional Learning Initiative into all of our programs to equip children to live great lives.

As we move forward, Clayton has partnered with the Center on Evaluation and Research at Southern Methodist University to help with both formative assessment and high quality evaluation of program quality and impact. This partnership will measure the impact of our Clayton Quest Academic Enrichment curriculum designed specifically for mixed-age after-school programs with the goal of achieving research-based certification by 2025.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Clayton serves families with young children across Tarrant County Texas. This includes families in both urban school districts (Fort Worth ISD, charter schools) and suburban districts (Crowley ISD, Birdville ISD, Keller ISD). OUr families are incredibly diverse culturally, ethnically, and socioeconomically.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, social media,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Clayton Youth Enrichment requests and uses many forms of feedback to: - to ensure the voices of the children and youth we serve are heard - Identify community needs - assist in qualitative and qualitative assessment of programs and processes - solicit input and suggestions for improvement from the families we serve and our staff - determine program focus Our Social Emotional Learning Initiative was created in response to feedback we received to a survey of parents, teachers and district administrators. These stakeholders told us that children were struggling to master the social-emotional skills they needed to be successful at school and in life. We saw that our after-school programs were an ideal place to learn and practice these skills and research-based changes were made.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Clayton Child Care, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Clayton Child Care, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 07/09/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Laura James

James Law

Term: 2021 -

Kimberly Coleman

UT Southwestern Medical Center @ Dallas

Pamela Smith

Retired School Administrator

Cindy Brewington

Edward Jones

Laura Docker-James

James Law

Cara Walker

Tarrant County College

Lyn Willis

Retired Tarrant County

Nancy Kirkland

Retired - Birdville ISD

Jarrett Jackson

Tarrant County

Austin Burns

Frost Bank

David Jackson

American Traffic Solutions

Curtis Linscott

Hudson Cook LLP

Whitney Ford

Whitley Penn

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/20/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/20/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.