Meals On Wheels Of Tarrant County

Delivering meals and so much more...

Fort Worth, TX   |  http://www.mealsonwheels.org

Mission

Meals On Wheels, Inc. of Tarrant County works to promote the dignity and independence of older adults, persons with disabilities, and other homebound persons by delivering nutritious meals and providing or coordinating needed services.

This program serves all 41 cities located within the boundaries of Tarrant County, Texas. The largest city is Fort Worth.

Notes from the nonprofit

Meals On Wheels relocated March 14, 2016 to a new facility designed to meet current needs and provide room for growth as the organization continues to expand and provide more services aimed and enabling homebound elderly and disabled individuals to remain independent at home for as long as possible. Meals On Wheels started a new program in April 2020, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This program will deliver frozen meals along with fresh produce and senior-friendly canned goods to those who are food insecure and do not have access to healthy food. Participants in this program are able to cook for themselves but need food.

Ruling year info

1978

President & CEO

Mrs. Carla Jutson

Main address

5740 Airport Freeway

Fort Worth, TX 76117 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-1568798

NTEE code info

Meals on Wheels (K36)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Meals On Wheels works to address the problems of malnutrition, hunger, food insecurity, poor physical and mental health, and social isolation. Assisting individuals to remain at home in a safe and healthy environment can often be achieved with nutritious meals and daily wellness checks. This program allows people to remain at home and avoid costly institutionalization, often at the expense of taxpayers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Home-Delivered Meals

Freshly prepared, nutritious meals are delivered by volunteers to the homes of homebound elderly and disabled people who are unable to prepare a meal for themselves and have no one to help them on a regular basis.  Most clients receive lunch and a cold breakfast for the next day.  Meals are delivered Monday through Friday.   Clients who do not have any assistance on the weekend also receive weekend meals that are delivered on Friday.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

This program provides specific assistance to clients when a need is identified and other resources are not available to meet the need.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Providing pet food for clients who can no longer afford to purchase food for their cat or dog.  Most of the food is donated and volunteers deliver to the clients.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

The Nutrition Counseling program offers assistance to home delivered meal clients with chronic health conditions. The goal of this program is to provide education and support that will enable a client to better manage his or her medical situation through better food choices.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

• We found the risk for severe reactions and interactions, medication errors, and medication duplications at an alarming rate among our clients.
• This project decreases the risk of adverse medication effects and saves health care dollars by preventing serious adverse drug events on the front end and eliminating the need for clients to use hospitals because of medication issues.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2016

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2015

Affiliations & memberships

Meals on Wheels Association of America 1976

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 1979

Northeast Tarrant Chamber of Commerce - Nonprofit of the Year 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, People with physical disabilities

Related Program

Home-Delivered Meals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number represents the total number of clients receiving service during the fiscal year that ends on 09/30 of each year.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Home-Delivered Meals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteers deliver meals, help clients with home repair projects, serve on committees, assist with fundraising and marketing.

% of Clients reporting improved nutritional status since receiving home-delivered meals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Home-Delivered Meals

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

% of Clients reporting improved physical health status since receiving home-delivered meals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Home-Delivered Meals

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Deliver 1,500,000 meals to 6,000 unduplicated individuals

Outcomes:
90% will experience improved nutritional status
80% will experience improved physical status

Home delivered meals, professional case management, and daily visits will be available to qualified program applicants. To qualify for services, a person must be homebound, unable to prepare a nutritious meal for themselves, and have no one living with them or nearby who can help on a daily basis.

Professional case managers will assess the need and either approve or deny the application. Applicants that are not appropriate for home delivered meals will be referred to community other programs that may be able to help.

Applicants placed on the program will benefit from a professional case manager who will suggest additional services that may enable the person to remain safe and independent at home for as long as possible. Case managers will visit the client at least quarterly and more often if necessary. They also assist with paperwork for other services, referrals, and other tasks as needed. Daily well check visits with volunteers will provide ongoing support and intervention as needed.

Clients will be evaluated when they are placed on the program and then re-evaluated every 4 months to document improvement or identify other needs that must be met to remain independent at home.

In addition to home delivered meals, the agency also offers home delivery of a weekly supply of frozen meals for individuals who do not qualify for daily hot meal delivery but are suffering from food insecurity or malnutrition. These meals were also available to participants at congregate meal sites during the quarantine periods of COVID.

In 2020 Meals On Wheels assumed responsibility for the congregate meal program and operation of several adult activity centers. The centers are beginning to reopen and participants are returning for meals and socialization.

Meals On Wheels, Inc. of Tarrant County has over 49 years of experience in providing quality services to the homebound. With over 6,000 volunteers and 250+ corporate partners, 250 meal delivery routes and 44 distribution centers are staffed daily by volunteers. This efficient means of meal delivery enables the organization to provide more meals in the community. Each Monday - Friday the central kitchen prepares over 3,700 meals for daily delivery; 500 frozen meal boxes for weekly delivery, and 250 daily meals for congregate sites.

With expanded meal plans, dedicated staff and volunteers work tirelessly to deliver quality nutrition services to people in need. Additional programs including HomeMeds, Nutrition Counseling, Client Assistance (minor home repair, incontinent supplies and supplemental grocery bag delivers and companion pet meals), and Telephone Reassurance provide our community with wrap-around support for those with greatest social and economic need.

A recent review of the client data indicates that 98.86% of all clients believe they are eating more nutritious meals since receiving Meals On Wheels. The same clients report 96.25% feel better physically; and, 94.80% feel better mentally since receiving services from Meals On Wheels.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Meals On Wheels provides home delivered meals to homebound individuals who are physically or mentally unable to prepare a nutritious meals on their own and do not have a reliable source of help. Supplemental nutrition meals are provided to persons who are 60 years of ager or older and lack access to nutritious food but are able to prepare their own meals.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, envelopes provided with space for comments,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The most frequent changes made based on feedback relate to items included on the menu. Overall, our clients are quite happy with the service they receive, the volunteers visiting each day, their case managers, and the office staff who make phone calls to check on their well-being. The supplemental nutrition portion of the meal program is new. We identified a segment of the population that had no access to resources such as food pantries and grocery stores. This group of people were capable of preparing their meals but simply did not have access to nutritious food. In 2020 we assumed responsibility for the congregate meal program. Centers are slowly reopening for meal service. We delivered to homes and offered drive by pick up during the pandemic.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback from people receiving our services is vitally important. The option to choose between two entrees, choice meals, is a primary example of communicating with clients to learn what we could do better to assist them remain independent at home for as long as possible. When clients have the power to choose their meal of preference, the overall approval rate improved.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Meals On Wheels Of Tarrant County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Meals On Wheels Of Tarrant County

Board of directors
as of 07/01/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Todd Webster


Board co-chair

Mr. Kerry Mercer

Retired Commercial Banker

Term: 2018 - 2024

Ossana Hermosillo

Community Volunteer

Carla Jutson

Ex-Officio / Meals On Wheels, Inc. of Tarrant County

Lesa Blakey

Inspirus

Brent Dore'

Attorney - Dore Law Group

Faustina Taylor Jones

BNSF Railway

Kurt Kulpa

CPA - Kulpa & Associates

Michael Menchaca

Fort Worth ISD

Kerry Mercer

Bank of America

Steve Relyea

The Relyea Company

Travis Kennedy

Happy State Bank

Amy Caster

Ex-Officio Past Chair

Todd Webster

Project Compliance

Nathan Draughn

BB&T

Laura Shaw

TCU

Karen Anfin

K&L Enterprises

Rosie Balbo

Vantage Bank

Michael Geekie

Southwestern Health

Becky Haskin

Makers Sales & Marketing

Ralph Mayfield

Retired - Verizon

Barbara Nance

Community Volunteer

Trina Pecina

National Laser Institute

Malathi Ravi

Attorney, The Blum Firm

Ann Salyer-Caldwell

Retired - Tarrant County Public Health

Trudy Sanders

JPS

Myra Savage

Bank of America

Jay Singleton

Retired - Tarrant County Administrator

Sandy Tarpley

Community Volunteer

bobby Tatum

Retired -Fire Chief

Rick Tice

Birdville School District

Weldon Washington

Retired - City of Fort Worth Housing & Economic Development

Julie Vu

Ex-Officio / Past Chairman

Megan Leger

Ex-Officio / Junior League

Jennifer Horwitz

Ex-Officio / Junior League

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/1/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/04/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.