Cross Plains Public Library

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CROSS PLAINS, TX   |  crossplainslibrary.com

Mission

To serve patrons by providing a secure and dynamic environment for life-long learning with access to materials for education, information, and recreation.

Ruling year info

1980

Board President

Ms. Janet Bond

Main address

PO BOX 333

CROSS PLAINS, TX 76443 USA

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EIN

75-1663419

NTEE code info

Libraries, Library Science (B70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We are very fortunate to get grants for programming, but it is difficult to get funds for operating expenses. Our library needs new lighting, HVAC units, and ceiling grids and tiles.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Library Services

We serve 2,148 patrons from a four-county area comprised mainly of farmers and ranchers. We have one paid staff member and our volunteers give over 4,000 hours of their time each year. Much of our funding is achieved through fundraisers, grants, and donations. Sixty-seven percent of our families fall below the Texas average in median household income. Because of the poverty facing our community, we are committed to providing FREE services and programs, except for nominal charges for copying and printing.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Texas State Library Accreditation 2022

Awards

Excellence in Small and/or Rural Libraries 2013

PLA/EBSCO

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Cross Plains Public Library’s mission: to serve the residents of Cross Plains and the surrounding area by providing a secure and dynamic environment for lifelong learning with access to materials for education, information, and recreation.

We house nearly 20,000 volumes and subscribe to the Bibliotheca library of e-books. We have a limited book budget and would like funds to expand our bestsellers, westerns, and Texas collection.

We have a computer network with wireless Internet access and would like to offer computer classes to our patrons. Unfortunately, we don't have anyone skilled in teaching the class in our town of 1000+ residents, so we would have to hire someone from another town or have someone train our staff.

Twenty-five percent of our operating budget is contributed by the city and county—the rest comes from donations and fundraisers. Living in a small town, there are only so many dollars to go around; we need to find new ways to reach more patrons.

For over 30 years we have offered a LAP (Learn About ... Program - for ages 0-5) but both teachers retired and we are looking for someone to teach the classes from November to April of each year. This was a volunteer position, and now it we need to pay someone to as we can't find a volunteer to take it over.

We want to start a coding club for our kids within the next five years.

We will continue to search for grantors who will donate funds to increase our collection.

We recently received a grant from AT&T/PLA to offer computer workshops. There are a limited number of courses available and training materials for instructors to use. These have worked out well so far, but there are other subjects our patrons want to study and we don't have instructor materials - this limits the number of teachers who feel comfortable teaching the class without any guidance. We will continue to offer workshops and look for programs that are free. We will also pursue funding for instructors to enroll in classes that are not free and that will assist them in teaching subjects that our patrons want.

Our new library director will be attending the annual conference (her first) and is excited to find creative and unique ways to expand our audience and draw more patrons from outlying areas.

We are working with Prenda to find a grantor for a coding club.

We continue to ask for a volunteer to continue our LAP program and we are looking for funds to pay for the teacher if needed.

All of these items require money. Last fall our board started viewing webinars about donor retention and getting new donors. We have become more transparent in our finances and have thrown away those "canned" thank-you letters to donors and replaced them with more personal notes. We are publicizing ourselves more to get the word out about the wonderful programs and services we offer.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    more than half are low-income farmers and ranchers. about 90% are Caucasian, 7% Hispanic, 3% Pacific Islanders estimate that 80% identify as heterosexual/straight

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have had many closures on and off during COVID-19. Our patrons complained that they did not have access to reading material during these times. Also, they could not visit our monthly book sale building which has used books available for $1/bag. So, we emptied our entire book sale building of the books (over 5,000), sanitized them all, bagged them up according to genre, ages and interest - western, romance, love inspired, Christian, adult fiction, teen, elementary, EZ readers, baby board books, true crime, sports - and put the bags on carts outside the library. We call this Grab'n'Go and it is extremely popular (although we miss the income and donations from the monthly book sales). Many books are returned back to us after being read, and we sanitize and re-bag them for others.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our patrons feel more included when asked for their opinions and implementing some of their suggestions

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Cross Plains Public Library
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Cross Plains Public Library

Board of directors
as of 11/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Jan Bond

Owner-3B Ranch

Term: 2019 -

Marsha Ossowski

Owner-Nubbin Ridge Vineyards

Michelle Kaiser

Owner-Rock Chalk Ranch

Pete Calvagna

Independent consultant

Dee Martin

Owner-Patsy's Flowers

Cher Ptacek

Owner-Cher's Art Studio

Kevin Morton

Ranch Owner

David Kuhlmans

retired

Judy Killgo

teacher

Brenda Wahlberg

Ranch Owner

Leslie Lawrence

retired principal

Ann Beeler

retired

Linda Burns

CPPL-previous library director

Christine Evans

retired

Melody Jones

Owner-Country Comfort Naturals

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/1/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/11/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.