DALLAS CHILDREN'S ADVOCACY CENTER

Providing Justice. Restoring Hope.

aka DCAC   |   DALLAS, TX   |  www.dcac.org

Mission

Dallas Children's Advocacy Center's mission is to improve the lives of abused children in Dallas County and to provide national leadership on child abuse issues. DCAC coordinates the investigation and prosecution of the most severe cases of child abuse in Dallas County. Last year, DCAC served over 7,300 children (and their non-offending family members) who were sexually abused, severely physically abused, or who had witnessed a violent crime. Our average client is a 9-year-old girl, sexually abused by someone she knows and trusts.

Ruling year info

1990

President & CEO

Mrs. Irish S. Burch

Main address

5351 Samuell Boulevard

DALLAS, TX 75228 USA

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EIN

75-2303404

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (TDFPS), in 2018, there were over 34,000 allegations of child abuse made in Dallas County. At DCAC, we coordinate the most severe cases of child abuse that rise to the criminal level. The overwhelming majority of our cases are sexual in nature; the alleged perpetrator is almost always someone the victim knows and trusts. During FY2020, DCAC served 8,068 children and their non-offending caregivers whose cases rose to the criminal level. DCAC serves clients from every zip code in Dallas County with the largest concentration coming from Dallas, Mesquite, Garland, Irving and Grand Prairie.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Forensic Services

Trained DCAC forensic interviewers conduct interviews of children, both as a first step in the child’s healing process and as a vital component of the investigation and prosecution of alleged perpetrators. The result is a legally defensible investigative interview of each alleged child victim. In FY 2020, DCAC conducted 1,921 forensic interviews.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children and youth

The Evidence-Based Therapy Program provides clients and their non-offending caregivers with cutting-edge, no-cost therapeutic services. Treatment is informed by an initial assessment to enhance engagement between families and therapists toward the recovery of children. In FY2020 year, DCAC provided client contact services to 2,498 therapy clients.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Adults

The Family Advocacy Team helps families navigate the complex process of investigation, prosecution and healing after a child makes an outcry of abuse. The team educates families about rights and resources available during crisis and provides tangible items and financial assistance on an as-needed basis. In FY 2020, Family Advocates supported over 7,431 client journeys.

Population(s) Served
Families
Non-adult children

DCAC has pioneered a comprehensive, multi-part training curriculum that provides holistic responses to Texas child abuse reporting laws. Last year, 99,754 people were educated in our curriculum by means of in-person instruction or online learning in the past year. In addition to our cutting-edge curriculum, we also host a Lecture Series which has provided training to over 2,000 professionals committed to serving children. Lecture Series topics are designed to provide continuing education for medical, legal, clinical, law enforcement and other Child Advocacy professionals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Best Places to Work 2018

Dallas Business Journal

Affiliations & memberships

National Children's Alliance 2021

Children's Advocacy Centers of Texas 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We serve children and their non-offending family members. In addition to 4,940 children served in FY20, we also served 3,128 adults/no age recorded.

Number of casework interviews performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Forensic Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth and families for whom the treatment and support plan is implemented as specified by the therapist

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Evidence-Based Therapy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of cases monitored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center (DCAC) is to improve the lives of abused children in Dallas County and to provide national leadership on child abuse issues.

Since opening its doors in 1991, Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center (DCAC) has provided critical, evidence-based services to more than 60,000 of the most severely abused children and their non-offending family members in Dallas County. DCAC was created to coordinate the investigation of child abuse cases that rise to the criminal level in a seamless, collaborative process. We facilitate a comprehensive, coordinated approach to these cases that not only results in more successful investigation and prosecution outcomes, but also provides a better and less traumatic experience to child victims and their families. DCAC partners with 39 organizations to form a Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) that includes medical, legal, and law enforcement professionals, and is designed to ensure child clients receive the appropriate services necessary for healing and safety.

In 2015 DCAC launched the Multidisciplinary Enhancement Program (MEP) in conjunction with a state-wide effort to ensure every child who needs services from a children’s advocacy center (CAC) gets them. A child arrives at DCAC through a referral from CPS or law enforcement. The MEP program enlists nine (9) full-time DCAC employees whose sole focus is to review child abuse reports. This process ensures cases rising to the criminal level are identified and addressed by the MDT.

Through our Education Program, we partner with, among others, Region 10 School Districts, Dallas, Garland and Mesquite ISDs, The Catholic Diocese of Dallas, Southern Methodist University, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, National White Collar Crime Center, National Child Protection Training Center, National District Attorney's Association, and the United States Marshal Service. Additionally, the Education Program provides Recognizing and Reporting Curriculum to an additional 108 child-serving agencies across the county and country.

DCAC is the only agency of its kind in Dallas County. Since 1991, we have provided hope, healing and justice to more than 60,000 of the most severely abused children and their non-offending family members in our community.

At DCAC, we know children who have experienced child abuse are predisposed to a variety of negative life outcomes. Without intervention, child abuse survivors are more likely to experience chronic health conditions, substance abuse, engage in risky or criminal behaviors, and ironically, go on to perpetrate the same abuse against their own children.

The long-term effects of child abuse impact not only the victim but our entire society. The Centers for Disease Control estimates the total lifetime economic burden resulting from cases of fatal and nonfatal child abuse in the US is approximately $124 billion dollars annually. That’s more than the annual cost related to public health problems like stroke and Type 2 diabetes.

Evidence-based programming offered at DCAC is instrumental in creating positive long-term impacts for clients. DCAC's therapy team measures outcomes by administering evidence-based assessment tools at therapy intake, during treatment, and at completion to collect pre-, mid-, and post-treatment information on children's symptoms of anxiety, depression, sexual behaviors, and posttraumatic stress. Additionally, Long-Term Case Managers follow up with clients after therapy graduation to ensure emotional health is continued. By making a profound impact on clients at the time of trauma and throughout their journey to healing, we can radically shift their response to abuse—decreasing symptoms and improving resiliency now and for years to come.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

DALLAS CHILDREN'S ADVOCACY CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

DALLAS CHILDREN'S ADVOCACY CENTER

Board of directors
as of 6/7/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Scott Breitkreutz

Holder Construction

Term: 2019 - 2021

Scott Breitkreutz

Brooke Hopkins

Chad Barrett

Brian Buffington

Rick Deitch

Amy Derrick

Cole Dulaney

Scott Everett

Dr. Phillip Ewing

Katherine Findlay

Mike Giffin

Doyle Glass

Rex Mann

Dr. Christopher Menzies

Children's Health

Laura Moore

Sean Murphy

Megan Steinbach

Toni Sutton

Craig Uebele

Lt. Carrie Wise

Kimberly Jones

PWC

Melinda Mathes

Christian Gournay

Kirsten Hill

Brooke Hopkins

Frank Howard

Chuck Jacaman

Ashley Kisner

Dr. Julie Linderman

Vista Lyons

Christian Moreno

Sally Hodge

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/25/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/08/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.