DRC Solutions

Housing First makes housing last.

aka DRC, Day Resource Center for the Homeless   |   Fort Worth, TX   |  www.DRC-solutions.org

Mission

The mission of the DRC is to provide respectful, responsible and effective community-based solutions to help individuals and families emerge from homelessness as productive, healthy people.

Ruling year info

1998

Executive Director

Bruce Frankel

Main address

P.O. Box 0871

Fort Worth, TX 76101 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Day Resource Center for the Homeless

EIN

75-2747809

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The DRC leads greater Fort Worth in innovative programs that reach for the ultimate solution to homelessness--permanent housing--on the strength of nearly two decades of service to North Texas. Because housing saves lives, reduces public costs associated with homelessness, and preserves quality of life for all, the DRC deploys housing solutions and strategies that set the stage for or support success in housing. It aims to end homelessness using a proven process: the DRC prepares, places and supports people experiencing homelessness in permanent housing linked with the help individuals and families need to emerge from homelessness as productive, healthy people. Permanent supportive housing, a combination of affordable housing and community-based support services linked to housing, is the emerging solution to homelessness. Today the DRC endeavors to preserve and expand permanent housing opportunities for people experiencing homelessness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Critical documents support

Critical documents support, a simple but often overlooked key to housing, employment and services, is vital to DRC Housing First strategies. It also is an invaluable service the DRC provides to clients of peer agencies in the Fort Worth area homeless services continuum.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Rapid Rehousing
DRC Rapid Rehousing programs quickly place people experiencing homelessness into temporary housing. Once housed, individuals or families are set on a path to secure permanent housing through professional case management and connection to the broader services available within the Tarrant County Continuum of Care.

The DRC works with Tarrant County Community Development and Housing Office with a capacity of serving 18 households for 12 months, and with the City of Fort Worth with a capacity of 56 households for shorter periods of assistance. Higher vulnerability households are given priority in placement in these programs, such as victims of domestic violence or people living with chronic illness.

Permanent Supportive Housing
“Permanent supportive housing is an intervention that combines affordable housing assistance with voluntary support services to address the needs of chronically homeless people. The services are designed to build independent living and tenancy skills, and connect people with community-based health care, treatment, and employment services.” (National Alliance to End Homelessness)

The DRC provides case management services for the 24 unit Palm Tree Apartments, an award-winning permanent supportive housing community developed by the Paulos Foundation in partnership with the DRC and Fort Worth Housing Solutions.

The DRC provides case management for the City of Fort Worth’s Directions Home program. This program serves 75 households through three (3) case managers.

The DRC provides case management for City of Fort Worth Housing Finance Corporation’s tax-credit properties. This program serves 37 households through two (2) case managers.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

DRC Mobile Assessors provide outreach services to ensure unsheltered citizens experiencing homelessness have access to housing opportunities in the community. This team locates individuals and families experiencing unsheltered homelessness, completes assessments for housing, helps them gather documentation required for housing program eligibility, and connects them with individual-appropriate housing interventions within the Tarrant County Continuum of Care.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

In whatever type of emergency that may arise, the DRC is consistently called upon by local leaders to provide overflow emergency shelter when traditional night shelters are either at capacity or must reduce available bed numbers.

The DRC will continue to serve as “The Safety Net’s Safety Net,” managing overflow shelter as necessary to ensure the safety of all those in our community who seek temporary shelter during times of crisis.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The DRC works to end homelessness in greater Fort Worth, Texas by creating and expanding permanent housing opportunities for people experiencing homelessness. It aspires to be both a service provider and developer of housing opportunities. To accomplish this goal, the DRC provides a range of services that prepare, place and support people experiencing homelessness in permanent housing linked with the help individuals and families need to succeed.

The DRC, formerly Day Resource Center for the Homeless, provides community solutions to homelessness that put Housing First.

Our strategy is based on one simple idea: the answer to homelessness is a place to call home. The DRC makes that happen, one individual or family at a time.

Neighborhoods and business communities touched by homelessness also benefit when people find the help they need, wherever need finds them. Accordingly, the DRC provides community-based services in partnership with peer agencies to cost-effectively expand our reach and range wherever possible.

Investment decisions begin with a close look at the offering, and charitable giving is no different. Consider these facts regarding homelessness.

Homelessness is costly: More than $30 million—$12 million in public funds and $18 million in private contributions— is spent on homeless services in Fort Worth and Tarrant County annually. Only one in every three dollars is spent on solutions like housing that end homelessness. “Emergency shelters, primary care at the emergency rooms, 9-1-1 response to homeless shelters, detoxification, and the cost incurred by libraries for providing de facto daytime shelter for the homeless are important services to be sure, but do not end homelessness," according to the City of Fort Worth study that launched its Directions Home program to end chronic homelessness.

Housing, the common sense solution to homelessness, simply costs less. Evidence suggests that as much as $1 million in public money can be saved annually for every 100 chronically homeless individuals housed, based on reduced use of hospital care and emergency services.

Housing improves lives: homelessness places people of all ages at greater risk of victimization, disease, mental illness and substance abuse than their fellow Americans. These factors combine to reduce life expectancy for people experiencing homelessness to an average of 64 years, compared to the U.S. average of almost 80 years.
By contrast, housing improves health, based on reduced demand for emergency medical services among people who have escaped homelessness.

Housing creates a vibrant community: the concentration of homeless services in Fort Worth's East Lancaster Avenue corridor has cost the city millions in lost taxable property value increases. This economic stagnation compounds the public and private costs of homelessness. Instead of concentrating services in one neighborhood, DRC solutions works to craft community-based solutions to homelessness.

The bottom line: we can spend millions to merely manage homelessness or invest to end it. Housing is the choice of greatest value to individuals and our community.

The DRC offers common-sense services solutions for individuals, families and communities touched by homelessness. Our proven process is simple: the DRC prepares, places and supports people experiencing homelessness in permanent housing linked with the help individuals and families need to emerge from homelessness as productive, healthy people.

Critical Documents Support: the DRC helps people experiencing homelessness replace identity
documents, opening doors to housing, employment and more.

Healthy community collaborative
The DRC is the housing prioritization partner in the Healthy Community Collaborative, an alliance of agencies led by MHMR of Tarrant County that is expanding outreach, housing, and other help For individuals and families experiencing homelessness who live with mental health or behavioral health challenges.

Victims Advocacy Project: the Victims Advocacy Project helps homeless crime victims seek justice, find safe shelter and more. In 2017, the Victims Advocacy Project expanded to include the Homeless Children Victims Advocacy Project. It provides trauma-informed care for children up to age 17 who have been the victims of domestic violence, child abuse, sexual assault or other violent assault.

System Navigators: DRC system navigators help individuals and families in Tarrant and Parker counties prepare for housing using the knowledge base that has made the DRC one of the top housing placement agencies In town.
Rapid rehousing: DRC rapid rehousing programs are designed to quickly place people experiencing homelessness in temporary housing. Once housed, individuals or families are set on a path to secure permanent housing with professional case management.

Permanent supportive housing: the DRC places and provides case management for people in permanent supportive housing throughout the community. The agency also is the housing placement and site-based case management services partner for the award-winning Palm Tree Apartments project, a groundbreaking permanent supportive housing community developed by the Paulos Foundation in partnership with the DRC and Fort Worth Housing Solutions. The complex provides safe, long-term housing for people who face the greatest challenges and has received national recognition.

Since realigning its mission and programming in 2015 to support Housing First strategies to end homelessness, the DRC has demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach and such applications as rapid rehousing and permanent supportive housing in greater Fort Worth.

In doing so, the agency has more than doubled its staff and budget, achieving an enviable success rate in the process. To date, 90% percent of DRC housing clients have maintained housing after one year, and 85% have maintained housing after two years. This extraordinary success rate then translates into public savings in costs associated with homelessness. In fact, evidence suggests that as much as $1 million in public money can be saved annually for every 100 chronically homeless individuals housed, based on reduced use of hospital care and emergency services.

The agency also created the Victims Advocacy Project, one of the first in Texas dedicated to the recovery of homeless victims of violent crime. That program expanded in 2017 with the launch of the Homeless Children Victims Advocacy Project, which provides trauma-informed care for children ages 6 to 17 who have been the victims of domestic violence, child abuse, sexual assault or other violent assault.

The DRC's award-winning permanent housing partnership with the Paulos Foundation and Fort Worth Housing Solutions took honors in 2017, earning an Award of Excellence from the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials (NAHRO) for affordable housing produced through innovation or public/private partnerships and winning the 2017 Partner of the Year Award in A Night of Light, the CNM Connect annual awards program recognizing excellence in the North Texas nonprofit sector.

Financials

DRC Solutions
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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DRC Solutions

Board of directors
as of 6/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Charme Robarts

Community volunteer

Term: 2019 - 2022

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data