International Elephant Foundation

aka Elephants, Saving Elephants and Habitat Worldwide   |   Azle, TX   |  www.elephantconservation.org

Mission

IEF creates a sustainable future for elephants. We generate and effectively invest resources to support elephant conservation, education, research, and management programs worldwide. Through our passion, expertise, knowledge and partnerships we inspire and engage people to ensure a vibrant future with elephants everywhere.

Ruling year info

2000

Executive Director

Deborah Olson

Main address

PO Box 366

Azle, TX 76098 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-2815706

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Elephants, both Asian and African, need our help. There are only approximately 35,000 Asian elephants left in the world, and they are only in the wild in 13 countries of Southeast Asia. About 20 percent of the world's human population lives in the present range of this extremely endangered species resulting in the loss of habitat and a large amount of human-elephant conflict.

The wild severely threatened African elephant is found only in Africa south of the Sahara Desert. The high human population growth in Africa is turning existing elephant habitat into cropland, increasing human-elephant conflict. In addition, the illegal killing of elephants for their ivory tusks is increasing, decimating many regional populations. Between habitat loss, poaching, and our ever-growing civilization, our world is quickly becoming a place that is too small for elephants.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sumatran Elephant Conservation Response Units (CRUs)

The Sumatran elephant is critically endangered, with some estimates as low as 1500 individuals left. Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra provides valuable habitat for this precious population. The Conservation Response Units or CRUs protect this forest and the elephants within. Mahouts and trained elephants patrol forests and the surrounding community protecting the forest and wildlife, reporting and interceding in forest crime, mitigating human-elephant conflict, and conducting wildlife conservation education programs. Not only do elephants benefit from this project, but all who share the ecosystem with them including the endangered Sumatran Rhino, the endangered Sumatran tiger, Tapirs, pangolin, hornbill, and more.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Mounted Horse Anti-Poaching Patrol Team in Kenya protects critical habitat for African elephants and other wildlife by patrolling, removing snares, treating injured animals, and even fighting fires. Team members come from the neighboring community, creating opportunities for them to teach about conservation and spread their knowledge as a trusted insider. Stopping poachers and wildlife crime is dangerous, but these brave patrolmen are passionate about what they do and it shows.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Iconic Tuskers are African elephants who carry exceptionally large ivory (over 100 lbs per tusk). These magnificent creatures are the iconic elephant you think of when you imagine historic, wild Africa. Unfortunately they are also major targets for poachers. This project works with local law enforcement and wildlife rangers to provide aerial surveillance for the Big Tuskers of Tsavo, Kenya. Helping these iconic elephants stay safe is the key to preserving their valuable genetics so they may pass them on to future generations.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Sharing your land and community with wildlife can be dangerous. For the communities around the Ruaha ecosystem in Tanzania, encounters with elephants are often deadly. This conflict breeds animosity and often feeds into illegal activities like poaching and destroying habitat. This project seeks to build a community consensus for conservation by implementing a conservation curriculum in local schools, hosting community film nights, and taking villagers into nearby national parks to see elephants and wildlife in their element. This plan has been successful in turning adversarial relationships into ones of appreciation and respect. Changing the hearts of those who must live around elephants is the most important step towards keeping elephants safe.

Population(s) Served
Adults

What do you do if an elephant is in the road? Approaching your farm? Blocking your path? India is often synonymous with elephants, yet so many of the communities suffer from deadly interactions with elephants, often resulting in the death of the animal. Using the popular tradition of street play, this program goes directly into communities and teaching best practices on how to safely live around elephants and avoid conflict. Through education we will foster coexistence instead of conflict.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The elephant population in Bardia National Park in Nepal has grown from 2 elephants in 1994 to 80-100 elephants now. These elephants use an unprotected corridor between India and Nepal, leaving them vulnerable to poaching and retaliatory killing from conflicts with humans. Through a collaborative approach with the locals, Community Based Anti-Poaching Units were established to patrol and help guide wild elephants away form human settlements and unsafe areas. By working together we can help this growing population thrive.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus (EEHV) has not cure and no vaccine. It is nearly always fatal upon the onset of clinical symptoms. This important project identifies the different strains, sequences them, learns how they act and react, and does extensive genetic analysis to help learn more so that treatments, vaccines, and cures can be developed.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Over the last ten years, IEF has supported the construction of ten ranger stations, veterinary facility, and the Joint Operating Command Centre (JOCC) which coordinate all of the Park’s ranger and security operations in MFCA in an attempt to take back the park from poachers. Where ranger stations have been established, wildlife is returning and snares and leg hold traps which are decimating many animal populations such as lions and antelope, as well as maiming and killing animals such as elephants and endangered Rothschild’s giraffe are found and removed demonstrating the success of the project. In 2020 IEF is supporting the construction of two additional ranger stations in the heart of poaching country where there is no ranger presence.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Independent Charities of America 2010

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of instances of poaching avoided or impeded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Poachers caught, arrests made, actions impeded.

Number of research studies funded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Each year, via our Conservation Grant Program, IEF funds numerous studies and research projects.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The International Elephant Foundation is committed to creating a sustainable future where elephants thrive. We know that there's a place for elephants not just for our generation, but for generations to come. Our projects focus on real solutions that have a high probability of being maintained by the local communities. If we are to save elephants the lion's share of the work will be done by those who share their landscape with wild elephants. Through anti-poaching patrols, surveillance, community education, human-elephant conflict mitigation, cutting edge scientific research, and management advances, IEF hopes to make a real difference in the lives of elephants for generations to come.

IEF focuses on creating a community consensus for conservation. We believe that in order to be successful you must reach the hearts and minds of those who will make the decisions about whether to harm an elephant or not, whether to clear their habitat or not, or whether to report a poacher or not. Our strategy is to support projects that directly contribute to this goal. We do everything from protecting elephants themselves, fostering wildlife crime enforcement, teaching co-existence techniques, school outreach programs, village and crop protection, and research into elephant diseases.

IEF's Board of Directors collectively has over 300 years of elephant conservation, management, research, and care experience. They are luminaries in their respective fields and know how to guide a project to a productive outcome. Moreover, our connections with nearly every corner of the globe make us a valuable asset in facilitating groundbreaking collaborations, information exchanges, and global meetings.

IEF has been instrumental in protecting the remaining habitat for the critically endangered Sumatran elephant, successfully maintaining and protecting key habitat that would otherwise have been destroyed. We are also instrumental in spearheading the fight to find a cure for Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus (EEHV). Since its identification, IEF has funded the research that identifies, sequences, and studies every strain of this virus. All research into EEHV is built upon this foundation, including the current work to looking into a vaccine, which IEF is also supporting. The future for IEF is continuing to champion elephants in every way needed, finding creative ways to solve problems, supporting new scientific research and breakthroughs that will help elephants live longer and healthier lives, and preserve genetic diversity so they can successfully breed for generations.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The projects supported by the International Elephant Foundation serve the communities who live alongside and share their land with wildlife and elephants. We have numerous projects that focus on human-elephant conflict and human-wildlife conflict by working on mitigation measures, co-existence, and education. We use a targeted approach to tailor the conservation resources to the needs of the specific region, aiming to build a community consensus for conservation. These people are farmers, students, rangers, artisans, and more. They live in regions in Indonesia, India, Nepal, Cambodia, Kenya, Uganda, Zambia, Namibia, Botswana, and any country with extant elephant populations.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Recently in a project in Namibia focusing on teaching best practices for human-elephant coexistence, we found that local goat herders were not able to attend day-long information sessions due to their work schedules. Due to the pandemic we were also unable to hold larger gatherings. So instead we broke the information into smaller sessions of 2-4 hours and held more so that farmers and livestock herders could attend. This was a direct result of listening to the community members and pivoting our approach.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Conservation cannot happen in a vacuum; local people must feel included in the projects if they are to be successful in the long-term. Our approach to integrating local communities is to treat them as the stakeholders that they are and make sure they feel a sense of ownership and pride in the work being done. This has allowed us to build legitimate change for the better, integrating the community with the goal of project work sustaining long after project supervision has left the area. Asking for feedback has helped build community ownership and created a ripple effect as community members spread the word about what they're doing, what they've learned, and encourage others to join in. They also feel like we are there for them instead of asking them to sacrifice for the sake of wildlife.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

International Elephant Foundation
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

International Elephant Foundation

Board of directors
as of 5/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Michael Fouraker

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/20/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/20/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.