Animal related

International Elephant Foundation

aka Elephants, Saving Elephants and Habitat Worldwide

Azle, TX

Mission

IEF creates a sustainable future for elephants. We generate and effectively invest resources to support elephant conservation, education, research, and management programs worldwide. Through our passion, expertise, knowledge and partnerships we inspire and engage people to ensure a vibrant future with elephants everywhere.

Ruling Year

2000

Executive Director

Deborah Olson

Main Address

PO Box 366

Azle, TX 76098 USA

Keywords

Elephant, elephants, conservation, endangered species, ivory, human-elephant conflict, habitat protection, environmental protection, poaching, African elephant, Asian elephant, Sumatran elephant, African forest elephant, savannah elephant, elephant welfare, zoo, circus, elephant protection

EIN

75-2815706

 Number

8251552880

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Elephants, both Asian and African, need our help. There are only approximately 35,000 Asian elephants left in the world, and they are only in the wild in 13 countries of Southeast Asia. About 20 percent of the world's human population lives in the present range of this extremely endangered species resulting in the loss of habitat and a large amount of human-elephant conflict.

The wild severely threatened African elephant is found only in Africa south of the Sahara Desert. The high human population growth in Africa is turning existing elephant habitat into cropland, increasing human-elephant conflict. In addition, the illegal killing of elephants for their ivory tusks is increasing, decimating many regional populations. Between habitat loss, poaching, and our ever-growing civilization, our world is quickly becoming a place that is too small for elephants.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Sumatran Elephant Conservation Response Units (CRUs)

Mounted Horse Anti-Poaching Patrols, Mount Kenya

Big Tusker Project

Building Local Support for Conservation, Tanzania

Fostering Human-Elephant Coexistence in India

Anti-Poaching Units in the Corridor Between Nepal and India

EEHV Genomics and Pathogenesis

Conservation of elephants in key areas of Murchison Falls Conservation Area (MFCA)

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of instances of poaching avoided or impeded

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context notes

Poachers caught, arrests made, actions impeded.

Number of research studies funded

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context notes

Each year, via our Conservation Grant Program, IEF funds numerous studies and research projects.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

The International Elephant Foundation is committed to creating a sustainable future where elephants thrive. We know that there's a place for elephants not just for our generation, but for generations to come. Our projects focus on real solutions that have a high probability of being maintained by the local communities. If we are to save elephants the lion's share of the work will be done by those who share their landscape with wild elephants. Through anti-poaching patrols, surveillance, community education, human-elephant conflict mitigation, cutting edge scientific research, and management advances, IEF hopes to make a real difference in the lives of elephants for generations to come.

IEF focuses on creating a community consensus for conservation. We believe that in order to be successful you must reach the hearts and minds of those who will make the decisions about whether to harm an elephant or not, whether to clear their habitat or not, or whether to report a poacher or not. Our strategy is to support projects that directly contribute to this goal. We do everything from protecting elephants themselves, fostering wildlife crime enforcement, teaching co-existence techniques, school outreach programs, village and crop protection, and research into elephant diseases.

IEF's Board of Directors collectively has over 300 years of elephant conservation, management, research, and care experience. They are luminaries in their respective fields and know how to guide a project to a productive outcome. Moreover, our connections with nearly every corner of the globe make us a valuable asset in facilitating groundbreaking collaborations, information exchanges, and global meetings.

Progress in wildlife and habitat protection can be measured by population numbers, and habitat acres. Those are hard to see immediately, especially with a species like the elephant whose gestation is nearly 2 years long, but progress can also be measured by community involvement and testimonials. Each poacher whose mind we change, each village who successfully protects their crop fields, each child who grows up to become a wildlife ranger is a success story and an indicator of progress towards protecting elephants for the future.

IEF has been instrumental in protecting the remaining habitat for the critically endangered Sumatran elephant, successfully maintaining and protecting key habitat that would otherwise have been destroyed. We are also instrumental in spearheading the fight to find a cure for Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus (EEHV). Since its identification, IEF has funded the research that identifies, sequences, and studies every strain of this virus. All research into EEHV is built upon this foundation, including the current work to looking into a vaccine, which IEF is also supporting. The future for IEF is continuing to champion elephants in every way needed, finding creative ways to solve problems, supporting new scientific research and breakthroughs that will help elephants live longer and healthier lives, and preserve genetic diversity so they can successfully breed for generations.

External Reviews

Affiliations & Memberships

Independent Charities of America 2010

Photos

Financials

International Elephant Foundation

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/20/2020

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender Identity
Female
Sexual Orientation
Decline to state
Disability Status
Decline to state

Race & Ethnicity

No data

Gender Identity

No data

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 05/20/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data

done
We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
done
We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
done
We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Policies and processes

done
We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
done
We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
done
We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.