THE WORKHOUSE ARTS FOUNDATION INC

10 years of powering the community through the arts

aka Workhouse Arts Center   |   Lorton, VA   |  www.WorkhouseArts.org

Mission

The mission of the Workhouse Arts Foundation Inc. is to grow and support a vibrant arts center that offers engaging opportunities and inspiring experiences in visual arts, performing arts, history and education.

The vision of the Workhouse Arts Center is to become regionally and nationally recognized as an innovative collaboration of visual and performing arts, education, community engagement, historical perspective and personal enrichment.

Ruling year info

2002

Principal Officer

Leon Scioscia

Main address

9518 Workhouse Way

Lorton, VA 22079 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-3057770

NTEE code info

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

History Museums (A54)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Workhouse Arts Center is one of the largest adaptive reuse projects in the nation. It is: • A vibrant arts center; • An educational resource; • A catalyst for economic development; • A venue that is preserving history; • A truly unique site. The mission of the Workhouse Arts Foundation is to grow and support a vibrant arts center that offers engaging opportunities and inspirational experiences in visual arts, performing arts, history, and education. We are making history! The Workhouse is a 12-year-old unique, incredible adaptive reuse project which repurposes 50+ acres of the former Lorton Correctional Complex into a thriving arts and cultural destination. As the only multi-disciplinary arts center in Fairfax and Prince William Counties, the Workhouse Arts Center is uniquely positioned to drive the artistic and cultural identity of the southern portion of the county, the Northern Virginia region, and the nation. The Workhouse offers experiences simply unavailable anywhere.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Workhouse Art Classes

This is the Workhouse Arts Center’s rigorous and progressive collection of visual and performing arts education courses and workshops designed for life-long learning experiences. Beginner through master classes are offered in all media and new course schedules are created quarterly.  Teachers are resident and associate artists and staff at the Workhouse, all highly qualified instructors and many with current teaching licenses from the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Students receive a fundamental, working knowledge of theatre in classes that encompass acting, music, and theatre dance, all of which are taught by professional actors and theatre educators. Students work together toward the common goal of producing a Showcase that is performed at the end of camglass, fiber and many more media are introduced. The summer ends with a gallery exhibit and celebration for friends and family.

Population(s) Served
Adults

National and International juried art exhibitions featuring art work in a wide variety of media that rotate on a monthly basis. All exhibitions are free and open to the public with the goal of providing the public with a continuous and diverse offering of visual arts.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Enjoy extended gallery hours, new opening exhibits, champagne, fine wine, craft beer, and live entertainment. The monthly Art Walk at the Workhouse is free and a great way to spend a Saturday evening with friends, family, or a date!

Population(s) Served
Adults

The performing arts program at the Workhouse is filled with diverse offerings including dramas, musicals and comedies for all ages. A Cabaret series is featured regularly.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The story of the Workhouse began in the early 1900s as part of the progressive movement, and represented a complete change of philosophy and treatment of D.C. prisoners. Classically inspired, symmetrical dormitory complexes were constructed instead of cellblocks. The brick buildings were built by the prisoners themselves, using brick manufactured at the on-site kiln complex located on the banks of the Occoquan. By an act of Congress in 1997 the entire Lorton correctional facility was closed, and plans were put forth to utilize nearly 3000 acres, which would be sold by the federal government to Fairfax County. A group of community leaders, artists and businessmen formed the Workhouse Arts Foundation and proposed that the former Workhouse be transformed into a multi-disciplinary arts center. After several years of planning, adaptive reuse and rehabilitation of the historic buildings, the Workhouse opened to the public in 2008.

Population(s) Served
Adults

At the heart of The Workhouse Military in the Arts Initiative's mission is the desire to help improve the quality of life for Military Service members and their families. Your support enables the WMAI to continue providing art therapy and arts experiences to Military service members and their families/care-givers in our community.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of free admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Students, Artists and performers, Veterans, Military personnel

Related Program

Workhouse Art Classes

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The Workhouse Arts Center swiftly pivoted to online and virtual arts programming at the start of the shut down. Once safe, new Community Engagement programs were developed to maintain arts access.

Total number of exhibitions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Social and economic status

Related Program

Arts Exhibitions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of professional artists employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Work status and occupations

Related Program

Workhouse Art Classes

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total number of classes offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Military personnel, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Students, Military personnel, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Workhouse has four primary goals:

• Visual arts – Support and promote the interests of the artists at the Workhouse and create exhibitions that connect art and artists within the community.
• Education – Offer original and innovative educational programs for people of all ages and skill levels, to foster an appreciation for the arts and encourage aspiring artists.
• Performing arts – Present high-quality performing arts programming to the regional community and provide opportunities to showcase talent from throughout the DC metro area.
• History – Preserve the history of the former District of Columbia prison at Lorton and be an educational resource for the general public to explore that history.

Workhouse Arts Center (WAC) traditionally carries out its mission through in-person experiences and engagement. In Spring 2020, our revenue, like many businesses, was profoundly impacted by Covid19. The Workhouse had to cancel all regular activities: classes, exhibits, camps, theater performances, and two beloved community events - both significant revenue-generating events for WAC.

WAC swiftly pivoted and continued delivering mission related arts programming because it has always believed arts are critical to healthy lifestyles and vibrant communities. WAC knew its mission remained more relevant than ever. Since the first week of temporary closures, WAC staff worked relentlessly to bring multidisciplinary art activities to Fairfax County residents (and beyond); creating virtual exhibitions, artists talks, simple classes, Lucy Burns Museum tour, live virtual events, Friday nights cabarets, and many more therapeutic, educational and enriching art experiences. Many activities are free of charge and continue to gain more engagement than we imagined; reaffirming to the Workhouse Board and staff, WAC must continue our important work. Arts are powerful!

The Workhouse also launched online learning, applied for and received PPP funds, created the area’s first Drive In Movie experience, and opened some of the art galleries and our Lucy Burns Museum on a limited basis. We are thrilled to be able to pivot, but WAC needs help bridging the gap - especially with the unexpected expenses necessary to run online programming in parallel to our in-person art activities.

As the only multi-disciplinary arts center in Fairfax and Prince William Counties, the Workhouse Arts Center is uniquely positioned to drive the artistic and cultural identity of the southern portion of the county, the Northern Virginia region, and the nation. The Workhouse offers experiences simply unavailable anywhere else.

This includes educational instruction in all visual arts disciplines, glass art, a high-end ceramics, performing arts, a robust culinary arts program including certification opportunities, the Art of Movement, robotics and STEAM-related education, and more. The Workhouse truly represents the power of the arts to transform communities and spark economic growth and development.

During the past decade, the Workhouse has played a key role in reshaping public perception of
the arts in our region and invigorated the economic health and resilience of our community.

In the previous fiscal year, the Workhouse presented more than 300 performances and 100 exhibitions in our 11 fully renovated Historic Register buildings, outdoor pavilion, gallery spaces, and 100-seat theater. Our campus served as a home for 87 resident artists and 25 associate artists who created and exhibited their work in our 12 art galleries and exhibition spaces.

The Workhouse also offered wide-ranging arts education, youth art camps, and wellness programs in 40+ disciplines for people of all ages, abilities, and interests. Performing arts programming included comedy, children’s theater, musical theater, dance, music, film, historic movement, and cabaret with most performances produced in-house.
The Workhouse is especially proud of the opening of our Lucy Burns Museum in January of 2020. The museum presents the story of the imprisonment of the 72 Suffragists at the Occoquan Workhouse in 1917 — and an event on these grounds that marked a turning point in the Women’s suffrage movement to secure voting rights for all women in the United States.

The Lucy Burns Museum also honors 91 years of prison history on the site. The Workhouse Arts
Center funded, designed, and renovated a new museum, restoring a decrepit prison building
vacated in 2001. Where there had been only peeling lead-based paint, asbestos, and rusting
cell bars, the renovation created a space filled with professional exhibitions telling the
national story of courageous women imprisoned at the Workhouse a century ago for
demanding the right to vote. The sacrifices of Civil Rights Protesters imprisoned here and the transformative events such as the prison trade of two cartons of cigarettes for a guitar that launched the musical career of former prisoner Chuck Brown. It’s a part of history that isn’t showcased anywhere else. The Workhouse is proud to make sure that these national stories rings loudly. History is something that has the power to captivate us. It has the power to teach us lessons as we move forward. We are honored to shine that light.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    We don't actively use collected feedback,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

THE WORKHOUSE ARTS FOUNDATION INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

THE WORKHOUSE ARTS FOUNDATION INC

Board of directors
as of 6/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Kevin Greenlief

Richard Hausler

Insight Property Group, LLC

Linda Evans

No Affiliation

Richard Klimoski

George Mason University

Timothy Rizer

Item, Inc.

Caroline Blanco

No Affiliation

Anna Bovee

Workhouse Studio Artist

Gregory Gadson

Fairfax County Public School System

Laura McKie

No Affiliation

Bill Mountjoy

IT & Management Consultant

Dan Twomey

NJVC, LLC.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability