Eight Days of Hope, Inc.

Love and Serve those in need

Tupelo, MS   |  www.eightdaysofhope.com

Mission

Eight days of Hope, Inc. is a nonprofit, charitable organization which exists to bring volunteers to a location affected by a natural disaster and assist homeowners in rebuilding and repairing their homes damaged as a result of the disaster.

Ruling year info

2006

CEO - Chairman of the Board

Mr Steve Tybor

Main address

PO Box 3208

Tupelo, MS 38803 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-3212540

NTEE code info

Home Improvement/Repairs (L81)

Voluntarism Promotion (T40)

Christian (X20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Within our organization we aim to love and serve people in need. We have focused our attention to rebuilding homes after natural disasters and building safe homes for women and children rescued from human trafficking. Natural disasters can happen within a very short notice and devastate entire communities. People are without power, food, fuel, and housing at times for months. Eight Days of Hope arrive in a few days after a disaster and offers food, generators, laundry and shower trailers, in addition to bringing hundreds of volunteers to tarp roofs, clean out homes, remove trees off properties, and more. In our safe house ministry, human trafficking is one of the fastest growing crimes in the United States. Human trafficking has been reported in all 50 states and in a 2016 study, 40.3 million people were estimated to be victims of modern slavery. We fight to change that by providing safe housing for women and children to be restored and healed from the evil they have faced.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Eight Days of Hope

Eight Days of Hope participates in at least 2 major rebuilding events each year. Each event typically involves approximately 2,000 volunteers reaching hundreds of homeowners in a disaster-affected area.

Population(s) Served
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Dollar price per hour of expertise

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We have a range of volunteers, less skilled and skilled workers. For the dollar/hour rate, we estimate the less skilled volunteer would make $30/hr and our skilled volunteers would make $60/hr.

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric is specific to our rebuilding trips as well as our safe house building trips.

Number of attendees present at rallies/events

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We began tracking numbers late 2020 with only 4 remaining trips to total 967 volunteers for those 4 trips. We had 14 trips within 2021 to total 3,439 volunteers.

Number of facilities improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We began tracking numbers late 2020 with only 4 remaining trips to total 524 homes remodeled or rebuilt. We had 14 trips within 2021 to total 997 homes remodeled or rebuilt.

Hours of expertise provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We only starting tracking hours starting in September 2020.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We did not track these numbers until September 2020.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We only tracked this from Sept. 2020 until the present.

Number of houses built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number only reflects the homes we worked on/built within our safe house ministry, since our other areas of service tend to be remodeling homes.

Number of partner churches

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of nonprofit leaders coached

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of active missionaries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eight Days of Hope

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our main focus/goals were to:
1. Launch our new branch of our ministry through mass feeding.
2. Expand our leadership team by 20 people.
3. Serve in multiple locations at the same time.

In order to accomplish our three main goals, we did the following:
1. Launch our new branch of our ministry through mass feeding. We started by doing a year end giving campaign to raise the needed funds to purchase all of the equipment, without having any debt, which we accomplished. We also hired a mass feeding manager to oversee the project who has past experience in mass feeding distribution. There are plans and set dates for several training opportunities for more volunteers and leaders to be trained in how to use the equipment to efficiently feed the masses when we go to natural disaster sites.
2. Expand our leadership team by 20 people. Our goal is to do this every year. We accomplished this goal for 2021 & 2022 and are now planning meetings with our staff team to discuss expectations for our leaders for the 2023 year. We ask our current staff and leaders to be on the lookout all year for "all-star" volunteers who could take on more. We trust our current leaders to know what is needed to be on the leadership team, so their recommendations go a long way. We do not bring any new leaders on the team unless multiple current leaders recommend someone. With these plans in place, we have been successful in bringing on 20 quality leaders that have stayed with us multiple years.
3. Serve in multiple locations at the same time. With expanding our leadership team, we have been able to deploy our leaders to different states several times this year to head up hundreds of volunteers to serve and love people in need. In continuing our leadership growth, in addition to purchasing more equipment we will continue to strive to serve people in different locations at one time.

1. We have purchased all needed equipment, hired a staff member to oversee the mass feeding distribution, and will train more volunteers to help run our mass feeding branch. This helps us respond to disasters by providing hot meals to families, days and weeks after natural disasters have hit their homes and communities.
2. With 180 current leaders, growing our team by 20 people is doable on a number of fronts. We have several trips throughout the year to see certain volunteers rise above and show great initiative. With 180 sets of eyes looking for new leaders, we have been successful in growing our team each and every year with quality leaders.
3. Our staff team is made up of 10 people who can spread out and assist our team leaders as needed. Not only that but having multiple trailers of all our equipment we can split up equipment to travel to different sites without lacking necessary equipment.

1. We have hired a new staff member to oversee this and all the equipment has been purchased without taking any loans.
2. We have been successful for several years in a row of growing our team by 10-20 people each year. We anticipate this continuing on a positive trajectory.
3. Two examples: we were building a safe house for women and children rescued from sex trafficking in Ohio while also responding to the flooding in Kentucky. A second example is yet again building a safe house but in Texas while responding to Hurricane Ian in Florida. We anticipate this happening even more in 2023 with more leaders, more equipment available, and an entire new branch of the ministry (mass feeding) being able to deploy anywhere at any time.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve families impacted by natural disasters through our rapid response division. We serve women and children rescued from labor and sex trafficking through our safe house division.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We take all feedback very seriously. Depending on what our volunteers, leaders, staff, and board suggest, we take the appropriate actions to correct, modify, or add to make Eight Days of Hope the best it can be.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has changed the relationship in many positive ways. 1. It has given the volunteers a voice and a say in the way we operate. 2. It gives them power in our processes, decisions, and more for the best volunteer experience. 3. It shows that those who make decisions value feedback after every outreach to honor those who give their opinions positive or negative.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Eight Days of Hope, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Eight Days of Hope, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr Stephen Tybor III

Wayne VanLandingham

Steve Tybor

Cindy Dilena

Mike Failla

Brian Miller

Chad Stutzman

Tim Wildmon

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/14/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.