Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

aka Casa de Esperanza   |   Houston, TX   |  www.casahope.org

Mission

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos strives to break the cycle of child abuse and neglect for at-risk infants, children and their families, by providing comprehensive residential and aftercare programs that transform people and communities.

Ruling year info

1984

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Melissa Simon

Associate Director, Staff Psychologist & Developmental Program Director

Dr. Ronnie Koehn

Main address

PO Box 301209

Houston, TX 77230 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

76-0105306

NTEE code info

Foster Care (P32)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

VISION: Every child deserves a home that provides safety, health, permanence and hope. Childhood trauma is a serious public health issue leading to lifelong risk for adverse effects. • Child abuse & neglect fatalities in Texas increased 11 percent over 2018. In the greater Houston area there was an 85% increase during the same time. • Almost 80% of all confirmed child abuse and neglect fatalities in Texas were children 3 years of age and younger. • 15% of the homeless population in Houston are children. • 25% of children in southeast Texas are food insecure. Casa de Esperanza protects at-risk infants and young children who are not otherwise receiving services. These children are at significantly higher risk of physical and emotional injury that can affect them for the rest of their lives. Prevention and early intervention are critical to mediate the effects of trauma. By working with their parents, a long-term solution is sought to ensure the health and safety of each family.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Residential Program

Children come to Casa de Esperanza for only one reason - because they are not safe. This program provides trauma-informed care for children who are newborn to six years of age, indigent and currently in a crisis or life-threatening situation. The focus is on providing voluntary residential care for children who are not receiving services. These children have already suffered trauma that may affect them for their lifetime and live in a state of fear and hyper-vigilance. In addition to daily care, the children receive comprehensive evaluation and treatment for medical, emotional and developmental needs. While their children are kept safe, parents receive assistance in addressing their own needs and establishing a safe home for their families.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Economically disadvantaged people

The Hands of Hope Service Program provides a one-year service program
for recent college graduates. After extensive pre-service training, these skilled
and dedicated individuals live and work in our children’s homes and function as
parents and role models, providing quality care for the at-risk young children we
serve. Working in this program for one year benefits each individual and transforms
their outlook on life. Their experiences at Casa de Esperanza have changed the
direction of many of their lives. All now approach their careers with
new insights regarding the needs of at-risk children and their families.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Economically disadvantaged people

This program provides comprehensive psychological and developmental services for children who are currently or have been in placement at Casa de Esperanza. These children have experienced trauma and have significant medical or psychological needs related to prenatal drug and alcohol exposure, failure to thrive, birth defects, HIV/AIDS, trauma, abuse, neglect, developmental delays, and/or displacement. Staff psychologists also provide services to birth, foster and adoptive families and training for staff and foster families.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Economically disadvantaged people

This program supports families during a child's transition from placement at Casa de Esperanza back to his or her home, monitors the family reunification process for as long as is necessary to ensure the safety and well-being of the child, and provides services to address needs before they again escalate to the point of homelessness or the need for foster care.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

When family reunification is not possible, Casa de Esperanza is licensed to complete adoptions. Adoption is an important milestone in a child’s life; however, Casa de Esperanza’s commitment to the child and family continues throughout the child’s life. While adoption provides permanency and positive outcomes for high-risk children, families who adopt these children will require on-going support, education and a facilitated access to mental health services to help raise their child. Casa de Esperanza has a total of 235 adoptive families with 391 children.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau - Standards for Charity Accountability 2020

Charity Navigator 2021

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Americorps 1996

Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/Harris County, Inc. 2011

Association of Fundraising Professionals 2014

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2014

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new intakes into Residential Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

97 % of the children were referred by CPS without taking custody. Fewer referrals in 2020 due to COVID-19 pandemic.

Number of days of care provided through the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Days of care limited by COVID pandemic: 1. Fewer referrals. 2. Space required for quarantine.

Number of Hands of Hope house parents who provided services to the children in care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Hands of Hope Service Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

House parents (Interns) are recent college graduates committing to one year of service in our program. They receive training, a monthly stipend, health insurance, housing and a grant after 1-year.

Number of developmental evaluations completed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Children's Developmental Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This service was put on hold during pandemic.

Number of therapy evaluations completed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Children's Developmental Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of physical, occupational and speech therapy evaluations is limited in 2019 by changes in Medicaid coverage. Evaluations on hold in 2020 due to COVID restrictions.

Number of children receiving therapy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Children's Developmental Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of children receiving physical, occupational and speech therapy is limited by changes in Medicaid coverage (2019). Therapies suspended in 2020 due to COVID.

Number of pediatric medical visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes pediatric specialties, urgent care and emergency room visits. 2020 Pediatric visits took place in the Casa de Esperanza neighborhood.

Number of children provided with psychological consultations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Children's Developmental Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Psychological consultations include children, birth parents, foster parents, adoptees, adoptive parents. The number of children is no longer tracked separately.

Number of birth parents who initiated mental health treatment.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Parents

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Metric revised in 2018 to track number of parents who actually initiated treatment.

Number of birth parents who enrolled in parenting training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Parents

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Metric revised in 2018 to track number of parents who actually enrolled in training.

Number of parents who initiated substance abuse treatment during their child's placement

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Parents

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Metric revised in 2018 to track number of parents who actually initiated treatment.

Number of birth parents who attended domestic violence counseling

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Parents

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Metric revised in 2018 to track number of parents who actually attended counseling.

Number of children discharged to biological family members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children discharged to adoption

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children discharged to Children's Protective Services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of families receiving Aftercare services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Parents

Related Program

Aftercare and Outreach Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

An increased number of families requested help in 2020 due to job losses related to COVID-19 pandemic.

Number of families receiving Post-Adopt services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Adoption and Post-Adoption Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

30 adult adoptees received case management services.

Number of households that obtain/retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Aftercare and Outreach Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2018 number is affected by families who lost their housing as a result of Hurricane Harvey, either through damage to their home or lost wages.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Residential Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 volunteer program limited by social distancing restrictions.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Casa de Esperanza’s services are focused on providing safety, strengthening relationships, and establishing permanence for the children and their families, with the goal of breaking family cycles of abuse and neglect.

Goal: To provide safety for children and parents receiving services
Objective: Children admitted to Casa de Esperanza will be placed in a safe home and will receive the medical, dental and behavioral health services they need.
Objective: Parents will address the contributing factor(s) that led to their child’s placement in the Residential Program and participate in the development and work toward completion of a Plan of Service.

Goal: Through consistency, patience and flexibility, Casa de Esperanza will strive to model and form protective relationships and establish a sense of belonging in every parent and child that allow them to recognize, achieve and maintain safety.
Objective: Upon discharge, parents will report feeling increased levels of security, safety, and ability to effectively parent their child(ren).

Goal: Through relationship, Casa de Esperanza will facilitate and establish permanence for each child.
Objective: Children discharged from Casa de Esperanza’s Residential program will be placed in a permanent home.

In order to accomplish these goals, children receive comprehensive medical, developmental, psychological and educational assessment and intervention services while in residential care and parents receive case management and referral services while their children are safely cared for. Family reunification is accomplished when the parent makes sufficient progress on their plan of service and can provide a stable home for their family. When family reunification is not possible, Casa de Esperanza is licensed to supervise long-term foster care and adoptive placements.

After family reunification, Casa's Aftercare Program continues to provide assistance to maintain a stable home and progress made during the placement.

The Post-Adoption program provides assistance for adoptees and their families to support the placement and address difficulties that may arise.

All services are provided at no cost to the families or placement agencies.

CORE VALUES:
BELONGING: Few things are more damaging to a child than not being wanted. It is important for children to know they belong.
SAFETY: We establish and sustain safety through a positive environment, which is vital to a child's mental, physical, and emotional health, development and education.
RELATIONSHIPS: By forming strong relationships, generational change and healing are possible.
PERMANENCE: Children who have been abused, neglected, traumatized, homeless, hungry or affected by HIV reach their fullest potential when they are part of a stable and supportive family.
COMMUNITY: Casa de Esperanza's greatest resources are our relationships with volunteers, donors, volunteer foster families, adoptive families, Hands of Hope interns, and staff who open their hearts and change their lives to support the children and families we serve.
EDUCATION: We are committed to inspire and teach our community and future generations the value of protecting the most vulnerable.
SUPPORT: Services are provided at no cost to our families, through the generosity of our supporters, and without government funding.

Casa de Esperanza's trauma-informed, holistic approach addresses the full spectrum of needs of each child, beginning with providing immediate safety and care for children in crisis. A loving home, regular healthy meals and snacks, a bed of their own, and age-appropriate play activities, all combine to give the child a sense of belonging, the stability and loving care needed to overcome early deprivation.

Admission also begins the process of stabilizing the child and obtaining needed assessments, including medical and developmental evaluations. All recommended follow-up care and treatment is obtained. Children are taught age-appropriate developmental and school-readiness skills. From the intake home, children may be discharged to their family, remain in an agency home or be moved to a community foster home for extended care until permanence can be achieved. While their children are safely cared for, caseworkers facilitate services for the parents needed to establish a safe, stable home.

Children's lives change the minute they walk through the doors of one of our homes. There is immense relief when a hungry child realizes that food is always available, when a sick child receives needed medical care, and when a homeless child continues to return to the same house. They learn what it means to be loved. They learn they don't have to worry where they will stay or if or when the next meal will come. Their reduced anxiety allows them to focus on the developmental tasks of childhood. Because they have adequate nutrition, they will not experience the long-term neurological damage that can cause developmental delays throughout life. Hunger, hurt and fear are replaced by relief, security, and a reminder that there is good in the world, people who care, and a reason to hope. Parents learn to trust and also find reason to hope.

Casa de Esperanza has been providing services for at-risk children for more than 37 years. It's staff have a wealth of knowledge, born of experience, about the effects of abuse, neglect, drug exposure, and pediatric HIV/AIDS. In 1986, Casa de Esperanza expanded its mission to include HIV-positive children - one of the first agencies in the country to provide care outside of a hospital - and continues to be the only agency in the area providing specialized residential care for children exposed to HIV. Other programs were developed when resources could not be found for the children in the community.

The Residential Program includes a neighborhood of 10 children's homes in Houston and numerous community foster homes in surrounding counties. Our staff is dedicated to the work of Casa: 36% of professional staff has been at Casa de Esperanza more than 10 years and 25% more than 20 years. Casa de Esperanza has tremendous community support, with approximately 1,000 volunteers annually and meets its expenses through the support of the community. Casa de Esperanza receives no government or United Way funding and 81% of operating funds are used for program expenses.

The Residential Program is the entry point and core of Casa de Esperanza's continuum of care. Whenever possible, Casa de Esperanza uses and works collaboratively with other programs in the community. Casa's other programs were developed when needed services could not be found. Other programs include: Parent Support Services, Aftercare and Outreach, Adoption and Post-Adoption Services and Hands of Hope Service Year Program.

Because Casa de Esperanza addresses family crises daily, it is uniquely positioned to step up to assist families through more widespread disasters. After helping families through Hurricanes Katrina, Ike and Harvey, Casa has now stepped up to address the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on families. Many families have said that it is only Casa who is helping to put food on their table after loss of employment.

Casa does not duplicate available services, but collaborates and coordinates services with agencies throughout the greater Houston area to assist individuals and families in crisis.

• Casa de Esperanza has provided quality residential, medical, and psychological care for more than 6,000 infants and young children in crisis due to abuse, neglect or the effects of the AIDS virus without charge for over 37 years.
• Casa de Esperanza began with $500 and one rented house in 1982, and has grown to include a neighborhood of ten children's homes, many community foster homes, and 8 support programs serving the greater Houston area
• Casa de Esperanza was one of the first organizations nationwide to provide residential care outside of a hospital for children infected with and affected by HIV/AIDS, has been serving HIV-positive children longer than any other agency in the country, and is the only organization in the Houston area specializing in the residential care of infant and young children with HIV/AIDS.
• According to the National Center for Education Statistics, the public high school graduation rate for the State of Texas is 89% (2016) and as reported by the National Foster Youth Institute, only about 50% of foster care youth graduate from high school. Of Casa de Esperanza’s adoptees (eligible by age), 96% have graduated from high school.
• Casa de Esperanza has facilitated more than 391 special needs adoptions, including 28 HIV-positive and 97 HIV-exposed children.
• Casa de Esperanza has a combined adoption disruption and dissolution rate less than 1%.
• Casa de Esperanza has a dedicated staff: 37% of professional staff has been at Casa de Esperanza more than 10 years and 25% more than 20 years.
• Casa de Esperanza has significant community support with approximately 1,000 volunteers annually donating their time and expertise.
• Casa de Esperanza meets or exceeds 99.9% of the 4540 licensing standards evaluated by TDFPS.
• Casa de Esperanza's Hands of Hope Service Year Program has provided more than 500 college graduates with comprehensive training in the needs of at-risk children and hands-on experience in caring for young children who have been traumatized by their life experiences. These interns have enhanced their professional practices with an increased awareness of the needs of at-risk children and their families.
• Casa de Esperanza is a Better Business Bureau accredited charity, a DonorHouston Non-profit Partner, and has been awarded 3 stars by Charity Navigator

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Casa de Esperanza serves at-risk infants and young children in residential care and their families with case management services during the child's care and after family reunification.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The survey itself is a recent change and is still being evaluated.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has allowed staff to see changes in the parents' relationships with their children and their perceptions of improvements in their parenting.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We don’t use any of these practices,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, Parents sometimes respond with what they think we want to hear,

Financials

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 7/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Ben Brown

Baker Katz

Term: 2021 - 2024

Ben Brown

Baker Katz

Kathleen Foster

Founder, Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Meg Gentle

Thomas W. McGee

Global Oilfield Investments, LLC

Edward Smith

Ed Smith & Associates LLC

Marilyn Wilking

Consulting Physician

Marsha Dodson

Community Volunteer

Bart Barrett

Wood Partners

Brenda Koch

Community Volunteer

Colleen McLaughlin

Community Volunteer

Michael Morris

Taylor, Book, Allen & Morris, LLP

Kathleen Motil, M.D., Ph.D.

Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, USDA

Katherine O'Neil

Community Volunteer

Josephine Rodgers

Community Volunteer

Brad Dinerstein

The Dinerstein Companies

Shannon Hayes, M.D.

Texas Children’s Pediatrics

Jayne Johnston

Non-Voting, Junior League Representative; Community Volunteer

Mary Prochazka

Community Volunteer

Rebecca Baker

Bracewell, LLP

Karen Dixon

SunTrust Bank

Jacquelyn Cox

Citrine Strategies, Inc.

Shelley Starr

Non-voting; CEO, Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/22/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.