Dream Catcher Stables

Living Life without Labels

aka Dream Catcher Stables, Inc   |   Spring, TX   |  dreamcatcherstables.org

Mission

Living Life without Labels our mission remains: To provide a place in perpetuity where people with disabilities can be successful, equal, and capable, growing to their maximum life's potential through interaction with horses in a positive environment.

We accomplish our mission by providing recreational, educational, and sport programming, including vocational/pre-vocational opportunities, to youth at risk and persons with disabilities. Individuals are accepted without regard to race, religion, ethnicity, or socioeconomic background. Our funding comes from individuals, corporations, and foundations.

Notes from the nonprofit

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent home of our own in the general area of our present location. We currently call 22+ acres owned by Bush Intercontinental Airport and the City of Houston (under a grazing license until November 8, 2028) home. Today our horses enjoy a pasture setting of 17 acres and serve our athletes under spartan conditions while permitting and construction of a better facility progresses. The disruption and challenges of the past two years caused anxious moments. Our athletes and volunteers have "stayed the course." Parents are reporting that behaviors have remained the same or improved and that our athletes have accepted the challenges of limited lessons well. Our Why statement: Living Live Without Labels exemplifies the atmosphere seen every program day -- people first in every way. While 2020 became the year of exceptional challenges we remain a family dedicated to our mission and continued success - a genuine incubator for the future.

Ruling year info

2000

President

Mrs. Sanna Roling

Vice President

Ms Kristen Damon

Main address

P.O. Box 1454

Spring, TX 77383-1454 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

76-0618111

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Equestrian, Riding (N69)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

People with disabilities all too often are unable to reach their maximum capabilities. For some it is their physical limitation that delays them. For many others it is the societal stigma. At Dream Catcher Stables, by teaching horsemanship, we develop the entire person. Physically they exercise every muscle and nerve ending in their body. Emotionally they learn to love and in turn are loved by the horses. Interaction with volunteers allows everyone to understand capabilities and hidden talents. Our people with disabilities are accepted as people first. Perhaps most importantly of all, after improved self-esteem, is the ability to critically think. With the ability to critically think comes an entire avenue of opportunities -- asking questions, sharing thoughts, exploring possibilities -- that lead to productive adult lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Horsemanship for people with disabilities

Formal and informal lessons where youth age 5 and up and adults with disabilities learn to ride and care for horses to the extent that they are able. Where appropriate lessons and this program are tied to academic subjects.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Horse of the Year 2008

Certified Horsemanship Association

Horse of the Year 2019

Certified Horsemanship Association

Volunteer of the Year 2016

Certified Horsemanship Association

Affiliations & memberships

Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International 1999

American Quarter Horse Association 2013

Arabian Horse Association 2017

Certified Horsemanship Association 1999

GFAS 2020

Equus Foundation 2013

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 actual donor numbers decreased by 19%. All fundraising was by word of mouth and loyal donors. Covid-19 severely limited amounts.

Average number of dollars given by new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Horsemanship for people with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our 2017 surge was in part due to Hurricane Harvey. The 2018 new donor average was down in part due to the economy. Target audience more defined.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Horsemanship for people with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Donors followed us through newsletters and Facebook. One of our youthful volunteers launced our Instagram account.

Number of participants reporting change in behavior or cessation of activity

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Horsemanship for people with disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Observed changes seen on sight or reported by parents in verbal conversations. Despite the stresses placed on everyone because of the pandemic, our participants were able to remain focused.

Number of youth service participants who have involvement in juvenile justice system

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth required to complete court ordered community service. This program was suspended due to Covid-19 constraints and remains suspended at this time.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We call them athletes or participants, never clients at our facility. With the disruption of activities due to our facility relocation, some athletes chose not to participate due to challenges.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Local restrictions resulting from the pandemic cancelled all of our 2020 public events.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Horsemanship for people with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 13 volunteers contributed 71% of the volunteer hours.

Number of hours volunteers give.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Horsemanship for people with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteers cared for the horses, helped with construction, and with lessons. Covid caused us to have less than half of our normal program.

Number of external speaking requests for members of the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Horsemanship for people with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our founder continued to speak on disability education at the ESC IV Math Conference, and submitted a virtual workshop for the Texas Mathematics Teachers Conference (CAMT).

Number of lessons taught

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Horsemanship for people with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Severely limited in 2020 due to Covid-19 restrictions, construction and weather. As the year ended the athletes returned and numbers of lessons approached normal.

Number of press articles published

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Horsemanship for people with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Thieves stole our Calico high cube, 2 horse slant trailer with ramp and tack room in August.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We have four immediate goals.
1) to continue our program which is currently weather dependent. While the weather caused us to lose over 50% of our program days in 2015, In 2016 we reached an all time lesson high of 522 lessons due to good weather. Year end 2017 we blitzed previous totals with 665 lessons given. Weather and the immediate need to relocate shortened our lesson capability dramatically to 485 lessons in 2018. Limited program in 2019 due to construction demonstrated a comeback as the fall progressed. Program jump started in 2020 only to be shut down for 7 months due to Covid-19 and then reopened on a very limited basis.
2) to secure a permanent home. In 2018 we were forced to leave the land we had leased for 18 years a year earlier than planned. Without sufficient funds to purchase a permanent home we acquired a grazing license on 22+ acres owned by the City of Houston and Bush Intercontinental Airport. September 3, 2020 final construction approval was awarded. Currently we have all utilities, a portable building for office/training/restrooms and are going forward under federal, state, and local pandemic restrictions.
3) to meet our needs with fundraising. Immediately efforts are underway to secure the remainder of the 2021 budget and acquire $40,000 to construct the portable shelter for our herd. Then efforts will continue to locate and fund our forever home. Expectation is that we will need to raise $5,000,000. Everyone can help. We continue aluminum can collection with a goal of 80,000,000 cans to fund purchase of that forever home while helping save the environment. Through February 28, 2021 our shoe drive will provide income and help underprivileged peoples worldwide.
4) to accredit our program with Certified Horsemanship Association by December 31, 2021
5) to pilot the behavioral weekday program in school year 2022-2023 with the goal of full behavioral weekday program launching in school year 2023-2024. This wrangler program will assist local school districts in redirecting students from behavioral to regular campus life.

To achieve our goals we will:
1) Continue our in-house capital campaign including aluminum can recycling and a major garage sale.
2) Begin a major social media campaign in late 2021 with a goal of $2,000,000 in cash or pledges within a year of launch.
3) Assist in marketing of the Iron Horse Run which will benefit our capital campaign.
4) Continue to identify and approach potential donors and work toward acquisition of major capital grants. Prospectus updated by July 2021, delivered by hand or shipping service along with appropriate phone call requesting meeting.
5) Work to improve our board and provide consistent training for new board members and all volunteers as we move to our new facility.
6) Pilot a team building opportunity for the business community which will provide the revenue necessary to meet our annual budget.
7) Pilot a written plan for working with difficult students in Aldine ISD during the school day during the 2022-2023 school year, or before. Refine the plan and present it to targeted districts for their approval during the 2023-2024 school year.

Our all volunteer public charity has the ability to
1) allow volunteers to select the time and extent to which they commit ensuring that volunteers remain/become enthusiastic about and dedicated to our mission.
2) succeed on a minimal budget through careful shopping and a variety of in-kind donations (a large number of which are made anonymously or without documentation to us)
3) serve people regardless of ability to pay. Athlete families now are beginning to "pay it forward" in order to ensure that this successful program will always be here for them. They contribute approximately 8% of our annual budget yearly.
4) sustain itself demonstrated by completion of our 22nd year and continual growth of participants and volunteers without formal marketing.
5) provide personal growth for everyone involved.
6) expand our presence on social media and in the community as time allows using the information given by Professor O'Neal's Campaign Class at Sam Houston State University in the fall of 2016, that provided by the December 2018 Taproot Foundation workshop, Firespring in 2020, and our own board members.
7) reach further to garner additional sustaining donors.
8) a Founder and President with a never give up attitude.
9) continual planning, teaching, and encouraging of individual volunteers with a goal of developing a group of proteges to eventually redistribute the administrative and program duties currently completed by our founder.
10) trainings for volunteers as future CHA instructors expected to begin Summer 2021.

Celebrating our 22nd birthday this past August we
1) have made our current leased 22+ acres usable with bare bones facility - utilities, three cargo containers, an arena, sufficient fencing, and a 14'x60' portable building. The all-weather driveway and parking area is being donated by Cherry Construction to be installed as soon as weather permits. The land is ready for the proposed shed rows.
2) the airport permitting process was completed September 3, 2020 with Walter P Moore and H4 Architects and Engineers guiding us.
3) continue program with expansion planned. Before being interrupted by the Covid-19 pandemic our weekend lesson program had returned to full strength. Twenty athletes competed at Top Hands 2020 earning 4 first place belt buckles; 8 second, 7 third, 6 fourth, 9 fifth, and 11 sixth place trophies; and 7 participation awards. Covid-19 cancelled the 2021 Top Hands Horse Show and severely restricted our current lesson program.
4) continue to have new athletes and volunteers join us.
5) plan to strengthen our volunteer training as soon as we get our official temporary certificate of occupancy. We have added an abridged form of our policies and procedures manual which is required reading with signature proof. Current volunteers are being sent an email copy with the request that they return the signature page no later than the reopening of program.
6) Baker Botts continues to guide us through Covid-19 and beyond.
7) need a few good horses to support the growing program.
8) plan to review and upgrade our marketing and fundraising strategies this year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve people with disabilities ages 5 and older.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We now work to allow our athletes to help us untack and turn out our horses at the end of the program day AND are planning to create group lessons based on this desire. Consideration is being given to allow athletes to participation in lesson day preparations too.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Power has not changed officially. However the suggestions of future feedback areas has been welcomed.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Dream Catcher Stables
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Dream Catcher Stables

Board of directors
as of 7/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs Sanna Roling

retired teacher

Term: 1999 - 2020


Board co-chair

Ms Kristen Damon

self-employed

Term: 2021 - 2022

Denise Cheplick

Speech Therapist

Billie Jean Harris

ReMax East

James Fagan

Community Volunteer

Kristen Damon

Life Coach

Theresa Ramirez

Administrative Assistant

Ashleigh Mancuso

MBA Student

Sanna Roling

Retired Educator

Karen Streater

Retired ADA Administrator

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/26/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.