SAN ANTONIO FERAL CAT COALITION

Caring For Community Cats

San Antonio, TX   |  www.sanantonioferalcats.org

Mission

SAFCC is an all-volunteer organization dedicated to reducing the overpopulation of outside cats in the San Antonio area by rescue and Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR). We offer free classes to the public on how to trap cats and then provide traps on loan. Our Subsidy Program subsidizes spay/neuter clinics so the cost is only $20 for the surgery and rabies vaccination. Our home-based foster program rescues kittens and friendly strays for adoption. Additional programs help with vet bills for sick or injured cats, support colony feeders who are experiencing financial hardship, and trap for those who are physically unable to do TNR on their own.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are very proud that we are an all-volunteer group of dedicated citizens performing a valued service for free for our community. We help caring people who cannot turn a blind eye to suffering animals; and we work tirelessly to reduce the number of those suffering animals in our city.

Ruling year info

2005

President

Mrs. Sherry Derdak

Main address

PO Box 692308

San Antonio, TX 78269 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

76-0766948

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

San Antonio has a very large outside cat population. The reasons include a warm climate that allows for year-round breeding, a high abandonment rate where people move away and leave their pets behind, and a cultural component that resists spay/neuter. Our organization helps the public do Trap-Neuter-Return, the most effective way to control cat populations. We train people on how to safely trap in a free, 90 minute training class, then loan traps to those trained, and subsidize the cost of spay/neuter to make it affordable for the public at only $20 - which includes the sterilization, rabies shot and ear tip. The ear tip identifies the cat as fixed so it will not be trapped again. We also rescue young kittens and friendly strays as our resources allow. This further reduces the number of free-roaming cats on the streets.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Outreach

The core of our community outreach is the free classes we teach to the public on how to safely trap outside cats. Classes are 1.5 hours long and are held 3-4 times a month in different areas of the city. We give presentations to groups such as neighborhood HOAs, condo groups, apartment complexes, and businesses. We participate in animal welfare and adoption events as well as any public event we are invited too such as Earth Day.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Traps are loaned with a refundable deposit to anyone who has attended our TNR Class. Up to 3 traps per person are provided on a 2-week loan. A 2-week extension can be granted. Two sizes of traps are available, along with carriers and dividers to aid in recovery. Traps are also available for purchase as many people see their efforts as ongoing.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The SAFCC Helpline is the only helpline dedicated to outside cats in San Antonio. The Helpline volunteers respond to an average of 300 calls a month. It is a message system where every effort is made to return the calls within 24 hours. Helpline data is tracked regarding zip codes, numbers of cats and the situation. This information has been useful to track TNR progress and for grants.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In order to make TNR affordable for the public, SAFCC subsidizes the surgeries of all cats that are brought to one of 3 participating clinics by people who have attended our TNR Class. We pay $20 per spay, $15 per neuter, and additional $25 for complicated cases such as pregnancies over 45 days. This allows the clinics to charge the trappers only $20 a cat. This includes a rabies shot and ear tip which indicates the cat has been sterilized and vaccinated.

Population(s) Served
Adults

This program supplements colony caretakers who feed large numbers of outside cats with funds to offset some of the financial burden. There is an application process and to be accepted all cats must be sterilized and the feeder must show that the cost of feeding their cats is causing financial hardship.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Cat Crisis Fund support Good Samaritans and colony feeders when cats are found either ill or injured. We have a list of feral-friendly vets who give us a rescue discount. When a call comes in for a request for help, 2 of 3 Cat Crisis Committee members must approve use of Cat Crisis Funds. Sometimes it is to euthanize to stop suffering, surgery to amputate a severely broken leg, or to treat mange.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our Adoption Program accepts cats and kittens discovered through our TNR projects, Helpline calls and calls asking for aid via the Cat Crisis Fund. It is a small program limited by scarce resources. We have two Petco adoption stores: Dezavala and Austin Highway.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The SAFCC Trapper Team is composed of veteran trappers who trap outside cats for TNR when there is no one else who can trap. This program primarily serves the elderly and disabled. The trappers are paid $20 per cat which includes trapping, transporting to the clinic for spay/neuter, recovery and returning to where trapped. Any complications must be addressed where the trapper seeks appropriate medical care for the cat.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Combined Federal Campaign 2015

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Rescue / Adoption Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of cats and kittens adopted out and/or placed for adoption through our home-based foster program.

Number of phone calls/inquiries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Helpline

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric is the number of helpline calls responded too in addition to the number of inquiries received via email.

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Community Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of people who have been trained to do TNR in our free classes offered to the public.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Spay/Neuter Subsidy Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of spay/neuter surgeries subsidized through our TNR program and our adoption program.

Number of traps loaned.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Trap Loan Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric is the number of traps loaned out to our TNR class attendees to do TNR.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our ultimate goal is to have a community where no kittens are born wild on the street, where no cat capable of living in a home is lacking one, and where no outside cats go wanting for food, water, and appropriate care and concern.

1. Make Trap-Neuter-Return easier and cheaper for the public.
A. Easier
1) Maintain a Trapping Team for those who are not able to trap.
2) Assist with mass trapping projects for large colonies
3) Develop Transport Teams to help with transportation problems
B. Cheaper
1) Apply for grants that cover the clinic subsides which keeps the trapper's co-pay to $20
2) Apply for targeted grants to help with targeted zip codes.
2. Form partnerships with shelters and rescue organizations to take friendly cats off the streets.
A. Increase foster base.
B. Participate in adoption events.
3. Continue to support the Feral Food Program
1) Request donations for food.
2) Hold food drives.
B. Continue to fund and support the Cat Crisis Fund
1) Let donors know they can designate to this fund.
2) Send specific requests out for high-dollar injuries.

We have a core group of dedicated volunteers that run our main programs: Community Outreach, Trap Loans, Helpline, Trapper Team and Adoptions. We have over 200 members and a constant contact email list of over 3,000 who have signed up to get updates and news. We have trained over 9,000 residents to do TNR. There are 2 teams of presenters who teach the TNR Classes and also have an online TNR Class. The Trap Loan Team consists of 8 people who manage 210 traps. The Helpline is composed of volunteers who respond to an average of 350 calls/month. The Trapper Team traps for those who are unable to trap. We have partnered with three spay/neuter clinics and pay them a subsidy for each cat brought in under our program. Animal Care Services (ACS) supports what we do and has provided a letter stating they "support and embrace Trap-Neuter-Return". The Mayor and city council supports what we do and is appreciative of our service to the community.

To date we have trained over 9,500 people to do TNR. We have a bilingual TNR Class flyer and offer bilingual classes. Our Trap Loan Program has expanded to include cages for relocation, recovery, and socialization. Our Helpline Program has divided days into two shifts, an AM and PM shift so as to not overwhelm volunteers with the increased call volume. Our goal is to have two shifts for all Helpline days. Our Rescue/ Adoption Program has expanded to meet the constant need to pull kittens from backyard litters for foster. There is a growing need for our Feral Food Program so additional funds will be needed to support this program if it is to expand. The Cat Crisis Fund especially touches the hearts of our donors but can be very costly.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Most of the people we serve want to help outside cats and need our assistance. Some, however, due to the overpopulation of cats in our community just want them removed.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Helpline, Email and Facebook,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our Foster/Adoption Program was full and people who called wanting us to take their kittens for adoption were being turned away by everyone else. We established a "courtsey program", whereby if they kept the kittens and fostered them, we would help with the vetting and also help get them adopted.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    If they cannot afford to get a cat fixed they are feeding, we will pay to get it fixed for them, as long as they are willing to continue to care and feed the cat.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

SAN ANTONIO FERAL CAT COALITION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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SAN ANTONIO FERAL CAT COALITION

Board of directors
as of 6/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Sherry Derdak

No Affiliation

Term: 2021 - 2021

Sherry Derdak

No Affiliation

Megan Carr

Traveler's Insurance

Monica Caballero

Attorney at Law

Marte Kellogg

No Affilitation

Lorraine Cantu

Allstate Claims Adjuster

Laura Carver

Loan Officer for Inspire

Marcella Muncy

Frontend Developer

Kathy Jurgajtis

No Affilation

Leah Belanger

Paralegal for Hall Matson

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/12/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/12/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.