GOLD2022

SHIELD Mentor Program

Strengthen, Help, Inspire and Encourage Leadership Development

Greensboro, NC   |  http://www.shieldmentor.org

Mission

To Strengthen, Help, Inspire and Encourage Leadership Development by delivering structured mentoring activities and programs for young people.

Ruling year info

2008

Founder/Executive Director

Mrs. Precious McKoy

Main address

2715-D Grandview Ave., #218

Greensboro, NC 27408 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

76-0784186

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Nonprofit Management (S50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our mentoring services provide a lifeline for families who need a safe, supportive environment where children can explore their interests, get academic support, and plan for their future. One of the most effective interventions for at-risk youth is to provide them with a caring adult mentor who provides guidance, advice, and assistance. Young people understand the critical role caring adults play in their development. In the 2006 America’s Promise Voices study, more than 40 percent of young people said they want more adults in their lives to whom they can turn for help. Yet almost half of all young people say they do not have caring adults in their homes, schools, and communities (National Promises Study, 2006). We aim to close the mentoring gap while providing college and professional mentors.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Saturday Leadership Academy

The SHIELD Saturday Leadership Academy is a 12-week leadership-building intensive program for youth (grades 4-12). Sessions are held every Saturday. Youth participants and volunteers receive a certificate of completion after completing the curriculum.

The implementation of the curriculum is fully aligned with SHIELD's desired outcomes in core impact areas allowing participants to practice new behaviors, such as better communication, assertiveness, cooperation and problem-solving.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Preteens
Families
Parents

Many of our students come from at-risk communities. The most effective intervention for at-risk youth is to provide them with a caring, adult mentor.

Young people who are mentored are more likely to:

-Stay in school and graduate
-Avoid substance abuse
-Enroll in college
-Become community leaders

We help youth soar high!

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Preteens
Families
Parents

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

MENTOR: National Mentoring Partnership - Respondent 2008

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens

Related Program

The Saturday Leadership Academy

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

e.g., setting goals

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Expected outcomes of the SHIELD Mentor Program are improved academics, better school attendance, and decreased delinquent behaviors, aggression, and other problematic behaviors. The structure of the mentoring programs creates an atmosphere designed to decrease the limitations in the lives of youth to help them become more likely to fulfill their highest potential.

Mentors will be able to encourage mentees to 1) develop a positive attitude, 2) identify personal values and goals, 3) be open to new ideas, 4) use creative problem-solving strategies, 5) be an attentive listener 6) ask assertive questions, 7) be an independent thinker, 8) recognize their individual strengths, 9) develop self-confidence, 10) take risks, 11) be aware of their environment and 12) have flexible attitudes.

Our mentoring programs and services encourage students to improve grades and behavior. It requires students to establish attainable academic and behavioral goals, which we recognize as they are accomplished through the following: a. Decrease in disruptive behavior (e.g., reduced detentions suspensions, behavioral interventions, or involvement in the juvenile justice system); and b. Improvement in soft skills, life skills, prosocial behavior, and/or positive youth development.

All of the aforementioned skills and behaviors teach youth participants how to excel.

The program staff will be responsible for overall evaluation design, development of measurement tools, tabulation, and summaries, and collecting the evaluation data from mentors and their parents/guardians. Program staff will collect mentee evaluation data at the beginning and end of the program cycle. In addition, staff will create surveys for this project. The surveys will consist of both qualitative and quantitative items. Upon completion of mentoring sessions, participants will complete the surveys. Confidential surveys will be mailed to mentees and their parents/guardians to be returned directly to SHIELD. Data will be tabulated, evaluated, and compiled into reports at the end of each quarter for those reporting that quarter. SHIELD staff will meet to review the data and make program modifications accordingly. Program staff will also send out surveys at the beginning and end of each grading period to verify each student's start GPA and the end GPA of the grading period.

The SHIELD Mentor program aims to bridge this gap by providing caring adults for young people. SHIELD recruits community volunteers passionate about serving Greensboro's youth. It matches them with young people who need guidance in determining their future and how to get there. In addition to giving young people a trusted adult to whom they can turn for advice, the SHIELD Mentor Program equips students with leadership skills such as goal setting, effective decision making, and effective social change. The relationships and leadership skills young people develop while in the program give them the tools they need to succeed in school, careers, and life.

The SHIELD Mentor Program expands our partnerships and support base to host programs at schools/universities, recreation centers, libraries, local organizations, or similar venues to provide larger groups of participating youth (mentees) with access to technology, meeting space, and mentoring support.

We enhance strategies through partnerships with community-based agencies. We are working with Guilford County Schools, the UNCG Center for Youth, Family and Community Partnerships, North Carolina Families United, and United Way Mentoring Matters Hub to positively impact young people's lives. We also work strongly with UNCG’s Office of Leadership and Service-Learning and the Campus of A&T State University to recruit volunteer mentors.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve low income african american families and youth.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    After surveying our families to see what approach would work best for their health and safety, we offered 100% virtual mentoring as an immediate response to the pandemic.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our families have expressed appreciation for how responsive we have been in this moment during the pandemic. We have heard that the way we flipped and designed something useful for them helped their family stay on track for success.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

SHIELD Mentor Program
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

SHIELD Mentor Program

Board of directors
as of 11/16/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Antonio McKoy

Sonja Frison

NC DPS - Juvenile Justice

Kandis Sauls

Central Elementary School

Raynard Young

Guilford County Schools

Joseph Goddette

Greensboro Sportsplex

Brandy York

United HealthGroup

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.