Horsepower Sanctuaries

Where Hope Runs Free

aka Redwings Horse Sanctuary   |   Lockwood, CA   |  www.redwingshorsesanctuary.org

Mission

The mission of Redwings Horse Sanctuary is to eliminate the causes of equine suffering through education and community outreach programs, rescue of abused and neglected equines, and to provide permanent sanctuary or selected foster homes for those equines.

Notes from the nonprofit

Redwings Horse Sanctuary strives to provide excellence in horse care and community services related to equine education, volunteering, and foster / adoption. We are rigorously evaluated by outside agencies on a regular basis to ensure that our horse care is superb and our organization is transparent. For those in the animal rescue world, the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS) is the gold standard, and we have been GFAS accredited from 2016 to present. Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance (TAA) accreditation, which we have maintained from 2015- present, involves a rigorous regular inspection process. CARMA accreditation, which we have maintained from 2014 - present, also requires transparency and regular inspection. We are proud to maintain these standards of excellence and partnerships.

Ruling year info

1995

Equine Care Manager

Ms. Sara Ruggerone

Main address

P.O. Box 58 www.redwingshorsesanctuary.org

Lockwood, CA 93932 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

77-0269641

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Other Services (D60)

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We seek to end equine suffering by providing rescue, sanctuary, and foster / adoptive homes to at-risk equines. We fill a gap in humane services by specializing in bringing severely abused and neglected horses back to health. We also provide community education about how to prevent horse abuse and neglect. In addition, we rehabilitate off-track Thoroughbreds as an after-care partner of the CARMA placement program, and seek to ready these horses for new careers in adoptive homes.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rescued Equine Care

Redwings Horse Sanctuary is one of the oldest and most well-established horse rescues in California. Founded in 1991 and established as a 501(c)3 non-profit in 1995, we have grown from rescuing 15 horses in our first year to providing sanctuary and rehabilitation to 75-90 horses annually. We prioritize rescue of the most at-risk horses in our local community and throughout California, often from county animal services. We also rehabilitate off-track Thoroughbreds from the CARMA program. We operate a Foster to Adopt program to find forever homes to our adoptable horses, and provide permanent sanctuary to those horses that are not selected for adoption, or those that have special care needs due to old age or chronic health conditions.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Thru education and community outreach programs this category strives to eliminate the causes of equine suffering.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our unique Foster to Adopt program provides our adoptable equines a safe pathway to a forever home. Unlike many animal rescues that rely on kind fosters to house their animals temporarily, our foster parents intend to fully adopt the equine when they agree to foster. The “Foster to Adopt Program” is our way to ensure Redwings equines are placed in a safe home and will never again be in an at-risk situation.

Foster parents interested in adopting a Redwings equine agree to first foster that equine for a one-year period following a home inspection. During that time, the foster parent provides all care, including covering dental, farrier, and veterinary costs, and they submit a monthly report and photos to our Equine Care Manager. This continued interaction with the Redwings’ team ensures both the equine’s wellbeing and that the equine is a good permanent fit for their new home. At the end of the one-year period, the foster parent may formally adopt the equine. We specifically require no breeding or resale of Redwings’ horses. If circumstances change for the foster parent at any time during the foster period or even after adoption, the equine returns to Redwings.

The Foster to Adopt Program gives rehabilitated equines the chance to form a one-on-one bond with their foster parent and opens space at the sanctuary that allows us to rescue and rehabilitate more horses. We continue to provide permanent sanctuary and the highest standard of care to those horses that cannot be adopted due to medical conditions, old age, or to those that have not been selected for adoption.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families

Related Program

Foster to Adopt Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers include both fostered and adopted horse totals for year-end.

Number of animals rehabilitated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Rescued Equine Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Redwings provides costly rehabilitation and training to both rescued horses and off-track thoroughbreds each year. These numbers reflect incoming horses that are considered fully rehabbed at year-end.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families

Related Program

Rescued Equine Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Incoming rescued horse totals. "Rescued" means that they were given sanctuary at Redwings from an at-risk situation and rehabilitation was in progress at the time of the count.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Foster to Adopt Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

"Adoptions" mean that ownership was formerly transferred to a new loving owner after participation in our year-long "Foster to Adopt" program. These numbers do not include fostered horses.

Number of animals provided with long term care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families

Related Program

Rescued Equine Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This reflects the number of horses considered to have "permanent sanctuary" to live out their days at Redwings. This does not include horses in the Foster to Adopt program.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

• Rescue and provide sanctuary for abused, abandoned, and neglected equines.
• Rehabilitate equines and evaluate for health, soundness and adoption.
• Provide a permanent home for those equines that cannot be fostered or adopted.
• Foster/Adopt as many equines as possible into approved, forever homes.
• Educate the local community about basic horse handling, and how to recognize and prevent abuse and neglect.
• Rehabilitate and retrain off-track Thoroughbreds for new careers as family horses, trail horses, or light eventing, so that they can be adopted into forever homes.

• Increase promotion of our foster/adoption program through social media and local marketing.
• Create successful fundraising campaigns for our equines.
• Gain visibility and increase involvement with the local and surrounding community organizations and with equine industry organizations.
• Maintain accreditations with other recognized groups such as Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS) and the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance (TAA) to be able to help more horses.
• We have plans to move the sanctuary from Lockwood, CA (where we are leasing our property) to a permanent home in Paso Robles in 2021; moving closer to town will increase our visibility for adoptions, and enable us to attract more volunteers.

• Our facility is currently set up to house 70-90 equines.
• We have a talented and experienced Equine Care Manager and approved trainers that are capable and dedicated to retraining horses for adoption.
• We have one part-time employee to support marketing and fundraising activities. We also have a dedicated Board of Directors member overseeing fundraising efforts.
• We have an equine care team and staff ranch hands providing for the horses' daily needs and the cleanliness and maintenance of the sanctuary grounds.
• The Paso Robles property has been purchased in full, and we are completing building out the sanctuary capital project in 2021.

• In 2020, we welcomed 16 new horses to the sanctuary. We placed 28 horses in loving homes: 20 horses in foster homes (with the intention to adopt after a one-year period) and 8 horses were formally adopted.
• We have been successful in maintaining our Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries "Accredited" status, the highest level a sanctuary can achieve, since 2016.
• We have been successful in maintaining our Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance accreditation since 2015. We have been a CARMA program rehabilitation partner since 2014.
• We have begun a capital campaign to support the build-out of the Paso Robles sanctuary property and as of February 2021, we have begun the move to the new sanctuary location.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve: 1. The general public and local community by providing equine rescue and care education. 2. The local community in California by providing support for law enforcement and humane agencies working on abuse and neglect cases. We often direct the general public on how to report equine abuse and neglect. 3. Our volunteers by providing in-depth education on horse handling. 4. Our foster and adoptive families, by providing them with a loving, rehabilitated horse as a companion. We provide support throughout the foster and adoption process and are a resource for the horse's life. We will always take a Redwings horse back if circumstances change for the adopter.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, We welcome feedback emails to [email protected],

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Over the years, Redwings changed from a sanctuary-only facility to one that provides horse adoption services in part based on feedback and interest in adoptions. We have updated our horse rescue resource guide, which we provide to callers needing assistance, based on feedback and the needs of those who contact us. We have updated portions of volunteer trainings based on feedback.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our relationship with constituents - volunteers, community members, and adoptive / foster families - is always top of mind based on feedback and interaction. We feel that our constituents who are involved with our organization have a strong impact on how our people-facing (rather than equine care) portion of our work evolves.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Horsepower Sanctuaries
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Horsepower Sanctuaries

Board of directors
as of 4/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Greg Wyatt

Owner, Precision Collision (Ret.)

Term: 2019 - 2021

Vickie Mullins

Berkshire Hathaway Home Services

Gretel Crum

Community Volunteer

Linelle Soxman

Community Volunteer

Jana Kaba

Berkshire Hathaway Home Services

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/2/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data