FOOD, Inc. (Central California Food Bank)

Give them nourishment today so they can thrive tomorrow

aka Central California Food Bank   |   Fresno, CA   |  www.ccfoodbank.org

Mission

Central California Food Bank (formerly Community Food Bank) is the region’s largest nonprofit organization focused solely on ending hunger. Our mission is to fight hunger by gathering and distributing food, engaging in partnerships that advance self-sufficiency, and providing community leadership on issues related to hunger. Through these efforts, we envision a hunger-free Central California. Through our comprehensive hunger-relief programs and services, Central California Food Bank provides food to more than 280,000 people each month, including nearly 100,000 children throughout Fresno, Madera, Tulare, Kings, and Kern Counties.

Ruling year info

1997

co-CEO

Mrs. Kym Dildine

co-CEO

Mrs. Natalie Caples

Main address

4010 E. Amendola Dr.

Fresno, CA 93725 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Community Food Bank

EIN

77-0320851

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our programs work to address both the issues of food insecurity and the lack of access to healthy foods in California's Central Valley. It is hard to imagine that one of the top agriculture-producing regions in the nation also has one of the highest levels of food insecurity. In fact, the Fresno region has the fifth highest food hardship rate in the nation, as ranked by the Food Research and Action Center. One in four adults and one in three children in the Central Valley do not have sufficient access to food. The region suffers from chronically high unemployment and poverty. Unemployment recently hit 9.5% - twice that of state and national averages, and 25% of the population lives below the federal poverty level. Furthermore, rural residents of Central California face the added challenge of limited geographical access to foods that are healthy. We reduce hunger and increase access to healthy foods by distributing food directly to the low-income and rural communities that need it most.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Neighborhood Market

Farmer’s market-style distribution providing fresh fruits and vegetables to destitute communities in the Central Valley at no cost. A typical market might include spinach and romaine lettuce, strawberries, plums, zucchini, carrots, potatoes and more.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Distributes fresh produce out of a self-contained vehicle that is equipped to distribute food wherever it can stop its wheels. The Mobile Pantry truck travels to remote locations to distribute fresh fruits and vegetables to people in need in rural communities.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

A supplemental nutrition program which provides children at-risk of hunger a backpack of shelf-stable, kid-friendly foods to take home every Friday during the school year, which serves 699 students at nine elementary schools in Fresno, Madera, and Tulare Counties.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

A program offering education and assistance to low-income families in Kings and Madera Counties in applying for federal food programs such as CalFresh (formerly SNAP)

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

We distribute government-supplied food commodities through 47 partner agencies in Fresno County

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

We provide food for distributions in collaboration with over 220 partner agencies throughout the Central Valley, including schools, nonprofits, community centers, and faith-based organizations.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America 1995

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Neighborhood Market

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of meals provided based on the number of pounds of food distributed (Meal conversion = 1.2 pounds per 1 meal)

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of pounds of food rescued through our retail rescue program. We pick up food from local grocery retailers, preventing this food from going into a landfill and getting it to those in need.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of people served annually through our programs.

Number of snacks served for students participating in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

BackPack Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of children served each week through our children's BackPack Program. Children who are at-risk of or experiencing hunger will receive a backpack full of food every Friday to take home.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Community Food Bank aims reduce hunger and increase access to healthy foods through our direct service programs and partner pantry programs. We seek to serve low-income families with children, seniors, immigrants, veterans, and college students who are under-served and disadvantaged by poverty, food insecurity, and the lack of access to healthy foods. Our goal is to bridge the meal gap by providing supplemental food assistance throughout Fresno, Madera, Tulare, Kings, and Kern Counties. Our vision is a hunger-free Central California.

We fight hunger by gathering and distributing food through a network of over 220 partner agencies. As a Feeding America member food bank, we engage in partnerships that advance self-sufficiency and advocate for hunger-related issues. Community Food Bank offers several types of distributions in order to make food accessible to those experiencing food hardship.

Pantry Program: We collaborate with over 220 partner agencies to provide food for distributions administered throughout Fresno, Madera, Kings, Kern, and Tulare Counties. Our trucks drop off the food at a scheduled time and the partner agency organizes volunteers to facilitate the distribution.

Neighborhood Market Program: Farmers market-style distribution providing mainly fresh produce to destitute areas of Fresno, Madera, Kings and Tulare Counties.

Mobile Pantry Program: Operated out of a self-contained vehicle, the Mobile Pantry truck is equipped to distribute food anywhere it can stop its wheels, and can access remote locations to distribute fresh fruits and vegetables to rural communities.

BackPack Program: Supplemental food program for children who are experiencing or at-risk of hunger while school is not session, which provides participants with a backpack containing high-quality food on Fridays to last through the weekend.

CalFresh Outreach Program: A comprehensive outreach program offering education and application assistance to low-income families and individuals in applying for the supplemental nutrition assistance program.

USDA Emergency Food Assistance Program: Food acquired from the federal government is distributed through 47 partner agencies within Fresno County.

Through our partnerships, community support, staff and volunteers, and other resources and assets, we are able to efficiently buy and transport produce at less than $0.10 per pound. With an amazing food acquisitions and programs staff, we work with local farmers, nonprofits, faith-based organizations, and community centers to acquire and distribute food in high-need areas throughout the Central Valley. We distribute food in specific neighborhoods designated as low-income census tracts by the U.S. Census Bureau in order to make the greatest impact.

Established in Fresno in 1992 by a local chapter of the United Way, Community Food Bank has been dedicated to feeding the hungry in local communities since its inception. We have experienced tremendous growth in the last 25 years, and now serve the five counties of Fresno, Madera, Tulare, Kings, and Kern. We operate multiple food distribution and outreach programs which, combined, distribute approximately 40 million pounds of food each year. Through our direct service distributions and partner pantry programs, we serve more than 280,000 people each month, 90,000 of whom are children. When we moved into our current warehouse in 2007, we were sourcing and distributing just over seven million pounds of food annually. In the past year, we acquired and distributed nearly 40 million pounds. We are excited to achieve this growth, but have pushed our current facility and infrastructure past its capacity. In order to close the meal gap in our five county service area by 2025, we need to distribute 80 million pounds annually - which is impossible in our current facility and with our current resources. The future of Community Food Bank's mission hinges on expanding our capacity through investments in a new warehouse, expanded distributed capacity, and sustained operational growth. Philanthropy will be essential for the successful implementation of an extended reach and expanded programs that will address a critical community need and better fulfill our mission.

Financials

FOOD, Inc. (Central California Food Bank)
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FOOD, Inc. (Central California Food Bank)

Board of directors
as of 6/10/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Beth Pandol

Retired

Term: 2019 - 2022


Board co-chair

Justin Emmi

JP Morgan Chase - Agribusiness

Term: 2018 - 2021

Justin Emmi

Citibank Commercial Banking

Jim Lynes

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Rosa Pereirra

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Brian Decker

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Joel Brownell

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Bill Littlewood

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Paula Armstrong

Kaiser Permanente

Joan Minasian

JAM Consulting

Lori Berger

AgBiome Innovations

Cory Pasek

Utility Trailer Sales of Central Ca, Inc.

Adriana Cervantes-Gonzalez

CSU Bakersfield

Sydney Stout

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Peter Vang

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Joe Baker

Enterprise Rent A Car

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data