PLATINUM2024

THE UNITY CARE GROUP

aka Unity Care   |   San Jose, CA   |  www.unitycare.org

Mission

Our mission is to transform the lives of young people in and emerging from foster care by providing stable housing, caring connections, and life skills that build a foundation to achieve their potential. Unity Care is the nurturing home that embraces, heals, and transitions foster youth toward adult lives of independence, wellbeing, and purpose. We are leading the way to eradicate homelessness and inspire hope for their brighter future.

Notes from the nonprofit

Established in 1993, Unity Care is a national accredited, strengths-based, family-focused, and culturally proficient youth and family agency. Unity Care’s goal is to provide safe, stable and affordable housing for youth and young adults as they age out of foster care and to provide them with the supportive services they need to achieve self-sufficiency.

Ruling year info

1992

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Larry Woodland

Main address

1400 Parkmoor Ave Suite 115 Unity Care Group

San Jose, CA 95126 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

77-0323115

NTEE code info

Foster Care (P32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing & Supportive Services for Transitional Age Foster Youth and emerging adults

Unity Care offers housing solutions to provide transitional aged foster youth (16–24) a safe, secure, and affordable place to live while they focus on their emotional, educational, and employment goals. We integrate resources and supportive services to ensure the well-being of those we serve, creating a home-like environment where youth and families feel protected.

Population(s) Served

Our culturally proficient outpatient Mental Health Clinic provides a wide range of therapeutic mental health services to foster youth and emerging adults in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems. We support the well-being needs of our young adults to improve their social, emotional, cognitive and physical abilities, enabling them reach their full potential.

Population(s) Served

Serving current and former foster youth (ages 16-21), ILSP develops the life skills needed to become self-sufficient through positive mentorship, regular workshops, and individualized services. Program curriculum, outings, guest speakers, and videos enhance the learning process.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adolescents
Out-of-home youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Homeless people
Young adults
Adolescents
Out-of-home youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Homeless people
Young adults
Adolescents
Out-of-home youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Homeless people

Where we work

Awards

"Award for Excellence” 2018

Wells Fargo

Certificate of Special Appreciation 2018

City of San Mateo

10th Annual Perry/Yonamine Unity Award“ 2017

San Francisco 49ers

Certificate of Appreciation as an Exemplary Community Partner 2016

Fremont Union High School District

“Movers of Mountains” Award 2008

the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Association of Santa Clara County

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of foster youth with housing arrangements

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Multiracial people, Children and youth, Young adults, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

Housing & Supportive Services for Transitional Age Foster Youth and emerging adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of foster youth who obtained employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Gender and sexual identity, Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of foster youth who completed high school or equivalency

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

Housing & Supportive Services for Transitional Age Foster Youth and emerging adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed healthy relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

Housing & Supportive Services for Transitional Age Foster Youth and emerging adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

"Number of youth who have access to Housing"

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

Housing & Supportive Services for Transitional Age Foster Youth and emerging adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Social and economic status

Related Program

Housing & Supportive Services for Transitional Age Foster Youth and emerging adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Determine and implement best approaches to providing housing, mental health, caring connections and life skills:

● Define and maintain UCG’s program portfolio strategy
● Acquire, engage and retain great talent
● Create and continually improve a consistent delivery system across all locations
● Invest in building relationships and revenue

1. Determine/Implement best approaches to providing programs
a. Define scalable, sustainable Housing Models (own, partner, lease, referral) based on analysis
b. Make/buy/refer Wraparound Services based on risk/reward and financial analysis
c. Build on PropelNext to expand use of data for learning, evaluation and ongoing improvement
2. Define/maintain program portfolio strategy
a. Analyze program portfolio and set portfolio criteria for resource focus and sustainability
b. Add and prune programs to support consistent portfolio strategy
c. Pursue partnerships to strengthen core programs and augment or extend capabilities
3. Acquire, engage and retain the best talent
a. Build strong employee development and retention programs
c. Add Board talent to bring needed strengths
d. Develop and implement leadership succession plans
Create/improve consistent delivery system across all locations
a. Standardize, strengthen and document internal processes and systems
b. Increase availability and uniformity of onboarding and training
c. Acquire and apply effective technologies to ensure operational and programmatic success
5. Invest in building relationships and revenue
a. Build effective annual and capital giving programs and philanthropic partnerships
b. Manage and strengthen public sector revenue relationships
c. Optimize the mix of federal, state, county, foundation, corporate, private and individual revenue
streams and partnerships

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

THE UNITY CARE GROUP
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

THE UNITY CARE GROUP

Board of directors
as of 06/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Elizabeth Pappy

Burke Williams & Sorensen LLP

David Hershfield

Hershfield Consulting

Cedric Martin

Amtrust North America

Carl Agers

Valocity Digital

Elizabeth Pappy

Burke, Williams & Sorensen, LLP

Anthea Louie

Pure Storage

Kathy O'Connell

Jeff Cherniss

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/11/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/06/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.