PLATINUM2023

Global Give Back Circle

Mentor HER Educate HER Support HER Employ HER

New York, NY   |  www.globalgivebackcircle.org

Mission

To support a world of gender equality, Global Give Back Circle and its partners economically empower at-risk adolescent girls and guide them on how to use their skills and talents to give back to their communities. Local players, private sector and governments engage in the solution and women from all over the globe give back as role-model mentors.

Ruling year info

2011

CEO and Founder

Linda Lockhart

Main address

400 East 59th Street Suite 12B

New York, NY 10022 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

77-0708340

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Secondary/High School (B25)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In the business world and development world, cultural transformation is a process. It takes time to embed new behaviors and shift mind-sets. In marginalized communities in East Africa, where harmful cultural practices keep women in the margins, Global Give Back Circle is driving cultural change through the economic empowerment of its adolescent girls.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Secondary School Program

Schools (with at-risk girls) partner with Global Give Back Circle in the implementation of the Mentor Program, the Economic Empowerment Program (Saturday Workshops) and the Give Back Program.
Currently operating at 4 schools: St. Elizabeth, St. Catherine, WE Schools and Gashora Academy (Rwanda)

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents

Where we work

Awards

Grant 2022

Mastercard Foundation

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of training programs created

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students showing interest in topics related to STEM

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of computer literacy/skills/technology courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of financial literacy courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of health education trainings conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Economically Empower at-risk Adolescent Girls
The youth population in Africa is rapidly expanding and youth employment in Africa is a global priority. With job scarcity, in cultures where boys are given priority to education, girls need additional support to become economically empowered to secure employment or a livelihood. Focusing on adolescent girls and giving them access to Life, Leadership & Workforce-Readiness Skills along with Mentorship through the secondary school system,, will be a GGBC top priority. Extending access to tertiary education programs which lead to job opportunities will also be a priority.

Embed a Give Back Ethos
Large foundations do not hold a monopoly on philanthropy and giving back. Giving back is a privilege we all share. Giving back does not discriminate. It is the one thing everyone, no matter how poor or marginalized, can take part in. The GGBC Give Back Commitment Model is designed to embed benevolent leadership behaviors by guiding girls on the ‘how’ of designing a meaningful Give Back Project, and a process for follow through and measuring impact. Every time a girl successfully implements her Give Back Project, she experiences real empowerment – benevolent empowerment.

Engaging Local Players, Private Sector & Governments in the Solution
Local players support programs when they play a role in achieving the desired outcomes. Private sector organizations value programs which engage their employees as agents of change. Governments value programs which are aligned with their mission. Engaging local partners, private sector and governments in the solution by involving them in the implementation activities, inviting them to milestones and updating them on achievements, will continue to be a top priority for the sustainability of the program.

Support Women to be Role-Model Mentors
Aligning our mentorship program activities to the economic and benevolent empowerment of adolescent girls, provides mentors with the level of structure and support they need to mentor with purpose. We want mentors to walk with their mentees over a multi-year journey, so focusing efforts on programming designed to constantly deepen mentor / mentee engagement is critical. Although there are mentors who are not affiliated with organizations, GGBC’s sustainability is linked to developing and growing active mentor chapters within large private sector organizations.


1) Expand GGBC’s Secondary School Program and ‘HER Lab’ Lite Program: Support 20,000+ more girls to realize economic and benevolent empowerment by leveraging GGBC’s alumni network, mentor network, technology and partnerships with secondary schools.

2) Sustainably operate ‘HER Lab’ in West Pokot: Continue to support an annual cohort of 100 adolescent girls / young women through a 9-month workforce-readiness program. Continue to include day-scholars - young women who fell through the cracks and value the acquisition of agriculture and entrepreneurship skills.

3) Expand GGBC’s Mentorship Network: Leverage private sector partners, partnerships with organizations and social media to increase the number of mentors.

4) Extend Access to Tertiary Education Opportunities: Continue to leverage strong mentor relationships (formed while a girl is in secondary school) as scholarship funding sources for college.

5) Align Organization and Operations for the Future: Build capacity in Team Kenya and invest in information technology.

Our Core Program partners with Secondary Schools in East Africa that are dedicated to educating at-risk girls. We bring onboard a Mentor Program, an Economic Empowerment Program (Saturday Workshops) and our signature Give Back Program. Our other program is ‘HER Lab’ - an Economic Empowerment Incubator. It is a Post Secondary School bridging program set up for the unique needs of rural young women, who live at 'HER Lab' for 9 months and gain workforce readiness skills in agriculture, digital literacy, coding, entrepreneurship, plumbing, electrical wiring, tailoring, baking, bead work, and hair design. They also learn how to apply for and are connected to, higher education scholarships and bursaries.

4,000 Beneficiaries

A Youth-led Leadership Team of 8 beneficiaries managing programming in Kenya and Rwanda

2,000+ Alumni in Kenya (alone) with the passion and capacity to facilitate programming activities at secondary schools, countrywide.

2,400+ Mentors contributing skills and networks with over 50% contributing financially too

Relationships with:
- Secondary schools that provide resources (space & staff) for program implementation
- Large private sector organizations - Microsoft, KPMG, and SAP particularly
- USAID, Mastercard Foundation, Ford Foundation, Safaricom Foundation and World Vision

Proven Processes for Mentoring, Give Back and Economic Empowerment

Unique Sustainable Funding Model for Mentorship



How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Global Give Back Circle
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Global Give Back Circle

Board of directors
as of 11/10/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Linda latsko Lockhart

Global Give Back Circle

Laura Ahto

BNY Mellon

John Tierney

E&Y

Robert Hertzka

ResortsOnline

Margo Day

Microsoft

Nancy Onyango

International Monetary Fund

Rose Musau

Preferred Personnel

Hope Murera

ZEP-RE Insurance

Christina Sass

Andela

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/10/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/10/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.