QUEER WOMEN OF COLOR MEDIA ARTS PROJECT-QWOCMAP

aka QWOCMAP   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.qwocmap.org

Mission

QWOCMAP uses film to shatter stereotypes and bias, reveal the lived truths of inequality, and build understanding and community around art and social justice. QWOCMAP creates, exhibits, and distributes high-impact films that authentically reflect the lives of queer women of color (cisgender & transgender), and gender nonbinary and transgender people of color (of any orientation), and address the vital, intersecting social justice issues that concern multiple communities.

Ruling year info

2004

Founding Executive/Artistic Director

Ms. Madeleine Lim

Main address

1014 Torney Avenue, Suite 111

San Francisco, CA 94129 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

80-0094746

NTEE code info

Film, Video (A31)

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Film is an extremely powerful medium that shapes narratives and societal perspectives. Yet the film industry is dominated by cisgender, heterosexual white men. Major academic studies prove that this inequity results in film depictions of historically marginalized communities that are extremely limited and often destructively stereotypical. When we are depicted, queer women of color, and gender nonbinary and transgender people of color are shown as deserving insulting jokes, hate speech, and graphic violence. Studies also demonstrate that these reflections of how the world sees us, impacts how it treats us, and shapes how we see ourselves. However, film can also transform by giving voice to the unheard and forcibly silenced. Due to the high price of film training and the exorbitant cost of filmmaking, few in our community can access it.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Filmmaker Training Program

QWOCMAP actively invests in, develops, and nurtures the creativity and leadership of our community, which is 20% African Descent/Black (African & African American), 22% Asian & Asian American, 21% Chicanx/Latinx, 10% First Nations/Native American/Indigenous, 5% Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander, 10% Southwest Asian, North African/Arab, Middle Eastern, Muslim, South Asian (SWANA/AMEMSA), and 12% Mixed-Race lesbian, bisexual, queer women of color, and gender variant and transgender people of color. Our community is also 79% low-income, 15% unemployed & marginally housed, 42% immigrant, 38% disabled, chronically ill & environmentally at-risk, 30% youth, and 12% elders.

QWOCMAP tailors programs to meet the needs of specific segments of our multi-racial, pan-ethnic LBTQ people of color population, which in turn expands participation and amplifies impact. We partner with other organizations that have significant complementary expertise and experience in serving our intersecting communities.

QWOCMAP is the only organization in the nation, and the first of four such organizations in the world, that specifically serves queer women of color, and gender nonbinary and transgender people of color through filmmaking. QWOCMAP has expanded gender and racial equity in the film industry by launching the careers of 350+ filmmakers.

Our Filmmaker Training Program equips our community with the concrete technical skills, practical artistic knowledge, and tangible leadership tools to create new films that address interconnected social justice issues. It provides rigorous professional training, along with filmmaking equipment, intensive coaching, and learning and career resources without cost to participants. It combines hands-on practice with industry standard equipment and interactive technical lectures that cover the entire filmmaking process from story development and cinematography, to editing and film distribution. Its proven, award-winning curriculum demystifies filmmaking in a safe, supportive, collaborative, and fun environment. Finally, it provides invaluable production experience so that each participant emerges as a filmmaker with a new film to their name, which is a major accomplishment in the male-dominated film industry. It offers additional learning and work opportunities for participants through QWOCMAP Productions, which provides videography, production and editing services to nonprofit, foundation, and artist clients. In addition, this intensive investment launches new careers that build the capacity, resilience, and economic viability of our community.

Since 2000, our award-winning Filmmaker Training Program has nurtured the creation of 425 films, leading both U.S. and global production of films created by our community. QWOCMAP Filmmakers report high qualitative scores for self-efficacy and agency and high quantitative scores for filmmaking skills and knowledge development. Many have gone on to successfully complete highly competitive, premier graduate film programs at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, UCLA, Temple, San Francisco State University, and UC Santa Cruz. They are leaders at organizations like NBCUniversal, Pandora, Google, and the ACLU, and in sectors from education and philanthropy, to the arts and electoral politics, with a run for the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.

In 2012, in response to a multi-year-long waiting list and workshop requests from Egypt and Uganda to China and Thailand, QWOCMAP redesigned the Filmmaker Training Program to tour across California and the U.S. That year, we conducted a workshop for Two Spirit Dine’ women in Gallup, near the Navajo Nation capital of Window Rock, New Mexico. In 2015, QWOCMAP conducted our first international Spanish-language cross-border filmmaking workshop in Tijuana, Mexico.

Our long-term partnership with Bay Area American Indian Two Spirits (BAAITS) resulted in a 2009 focus on Two Spirits in our Filmmaker Training Program, which drove attendance when these films world-premiered at our 2010 Queer Women of Color Film Festival, and developed subsequent interest in our Distribution Program. It also increased overall Two Spirit participation in our programs, which at 10% is proportionately higher than U.S. Census figures for the Bay Area at 0.5 to 1.0% Native American. In 2017, we partnered with BAAITS again and now have the largest catalog of Two Spirit films in existence.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people
Economically disadvantaged people

The FREE annual 3-day Queer Women of Color Film Festival serves approximately 2,500 people each year and is the largest event of its kind.

QWOCMAP presents its free annual Queer Women of Color Film Festival in San Francisco every June. The largest event of its kind, it has world-premiered 500+ films by queer women of color, and gender variant and transgender people of color filmmakers from across the globe. Audiences of 14,000+ have traveled from across the U.S., and countries from Turkey to Japan for deep audience engagement and public discussions that connect filmmakers and their films to social issues, grassroots organizations and social justice movements. QWOCMAP has worked with 100+ Community Partners to spark awareness and galvanize collective action through intentional practices that foster welcome, safety, and inclusion. The Film Festival has been lauded as “the most diverse of any arts event in San Francisco,” and the “gold standard for accessibility,” due to its services for Deaf & Hard-of-Hearing people, community childcare, fragrance-free seating, Crisis Counselors, and other free resources. One foundation program officer noted that in comparison to other artist talks, audience discussions at the Queer Women of Color Film Festival are a profound learning experience that provoked deep understanding of both the films and their makers.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people
Economically disadvantaged people

The Distribution Program links films by, for and about queer women of color, gender nonconforming and transgender people of color to international audiences of over 5,000 annually, who yearn to see these experiences authentically represented.

QWOCMAP educates the larger public and strengthens social justice movements through the boutique Distribution Program, which has released 420+ QWOCMAP films to the acclaim of international film festival jury and audience awards, and audiences of 5,000+ annually. QWOCMAP Filmmakers Yun Suh won the 2009 Teddy Award at the Berlin Film Festival and Candy Guinea won the 2017 Princess Grace Award and Audience Award for Best in Program at Wicked Queer: Boston LGBTQ Film Festival. QWOCMAP partners with film festivals, universities, museums, arts organizations, grassroots groups, and churches/temples/mosques to present films, speakers, and incisive social justice discussion guides on every continent except Antarctica.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants who would recommend program to others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Filmmaker Training Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The program has succeed and grown through word of mouth in the community. We do little advertisement. Most new participants know of previous participants who have completed films through the program.

Number of audience members with favorable attitudes towards the issue or interest

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Queer Women of Color Film Festival

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Percentages based on audience members that report such results, our curatorial practice, Festival Focus (ie, immigration, marriage equality, Indigenous people) educate audiences.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Filmmaker Training Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes the number of participants for each year of the program. In 2012, we changed our model, reducing participant numbers & increasing international reach and film production quality.

Number of Films Completed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Filmmaker Training Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Participants can complete films as individuals, pairs, or groups. 2013 was the year we conducted workshops based on our old model and our new model.

NUMBER OF COMMUNITY PARTNERS

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Queer Women of Color Film Festival

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since 2007, Community Partners are matched to films and communities represented in the films to spark individual awareness, galvanize collective action, and promote civic engagement.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

QWOCMAP is an artist-activist run organization that nurtures the leadership of queer women of color (cisgender and transgender), and gender nonbinary and transgender people of color (of any orientation) to create films that will foster broad cultural and political impact. We screen films to increase awareness and deepen public engagement. We distribute films to create strong movements that will lead to lasting change and social justice. QWOCMAP's vision nurtures our community to become leaders that incorporate the power of art as cultural resistance, cultural resilience, and cultural renewal.

Our goal is to see the media enriched and transformed by the films of queer women of color (cisgender and transgender), gender nonbinary transgender people of color (of any orientation), and that these films fuel social justice movements and create lasting change.

QWOCMAP's Filmmaker Training Program builds leadership, creativity, and power of marginalized LBTQ people of color as artist-activist filmmakers who can lead intersectional social justice movements from the San Francisco Bay Area to the world.

QWOCMAP's annual International Queer Women of Color Film Festival builds understanding and community around art and social justice.
Our Queer Women of Color Film Festival will sparks understanding and galvanize collective action through a combination of films, curatorial practices, expert facilitation, deep community engagement, and partnerships with grassroots organizations.

QWOCMAP's boutique Distribution Program provides films and discussion guides that strengthen social justice movements, and partner with educational institutions, film festivals, and community groups such as churches, temples, and mosques for activist training, professional in service, and political education.

QWOCMAP is deeply rooted in our community, and our 100% of our staff, Board, and Advisory Board come from the community we serve. They have decades-long careers in filmmaking and fields from fundraising to law, and expansive activist history in social movements, from anti-Apartheid to reproductive justice. As a result, QWOCMAP has the culturally competent expertise to serve our community as very few other organizations can. Equity and justice are the root of everything we do, from conducting filmmaking workshops that examine how shot sizes can convey stereotypes or truths about marginalized communities, to films and discussions that reframe human migration in support of equitable and just immigration policy. We ensure that are our staff and Board are from the communities we serve. We also ask ourselves who is not in the room and act to remove barriers. We build expertise within our organization by supporting leaders from particularly vulnerable segments of our community.

Since 2000, our award-winning Filmmaker Training Program has nurtured the creation of 425 films, leading both U.S. and global production of films created by our community. QWOCMAP Filmmakers report high qualitative scores for self-efficacy and agency and high quantitative scores for filmmaking skills and knowledge development. Many have gone on to successfully complete highly competitive, premier graduate film programs at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, UCLA, Temple, San Francisco State University, and UC Santa Cruz. They are leaders at organizations like NBCUniversal, Pandora, Google, and the ACLU, and in sectors from education and philanthropy, to the arts and electoral politics, with a run for the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    QWOCMAP creates, exhibits, and distributes films that authentically reflect the lives of LBTQIA+ African Descent/Black, Native American/Indigenous, Asian, Xicanx/Latinx, Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander, Southwest Asian, North African/Arab, Middle Eastern, Muslim, and multi-ethnic queer women of color (both cisgender & transgender) and nonbinary, gender nonconforming, and transgender people of color (of any orientation).

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, to improve equity and justice throughout our organization, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    • QWOCMAP is 100% led by, for, and about LBTQIA+ BIPOC • 20-year repository of culturally humble data • data is woven into a sequenced process, from human-centered design, to high-feedback loops/evaluation to create responsive and relevant programming • feedback allows us to prioritize the most vulnerable: i.e. 35% women survivors of violence, abuse, and trauma; 42% im/migrants, 52% Sick & Disabled; 35% transitional age youth 18-24 • data is used to identify collaborating organizations with complementary expertise to better serve community our community. For example, QWOCMAP has conducted 3 different filmmaking workshops for Two Spirits in Indian Country, which increased Native American participation from 5% in 2008, to 12% in 2020, many times higher than 2% U.S. Census and Bay Area.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Feedback loops allow QWOCMAP to find bright spots and nurture leadership from within the community. Even our community-sourced Working Agreements (which are shared with participants, Community Partners, Interns, Staff, etc.) and Values & Practices (a 300+ page document) incorporate all of the feedback and input from our community. By sharing those documents, telling community members that it is their feedback that shapes practices (ie, "whatever you tell us is what we do", and providing multiple avenues for feedback, empowers people to give us more feedback. These feedback loops result in programming that is so responsive and relevant that it can often seem prescient, however, it comes from deep listening and ACTION based on community needs.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    our challenge is in finding funding and support for additional feedback collection activities,

Financials

QUEER WOMEN OF COLOR MEDIA ARTS PROJECT-QWOCMAP
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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QUEER WOMEN OF COLOR MEDIA ARTS PROJECT-QWOCMAP

Board of directors
as of 3/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mx Leis Rodriguez

T. Kebo Drew

QWOCMAP

Madeleine Lim

QWOCMAP

Tijanna Eaton

Genentech

Lynn Sugihara

Dental Hygienist

Alisha Diego Klatt

UC Berkeley

Cassandra Falby, MSW

Therapist

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/04/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/04/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.