Zumas Rescue Ranch

Rescue Rehabilitates Restore

aka All Souls Rescue   |   Littleton, CO   |  http://www.zumasrescueranch.com

Mission

Zuma's provides a place of sanctuary, education and healing for the voiceless humans and animals in the metro Denver region.

Ruling year info

2008

Executive Director

Mrs. Jodi Messenich

Main address

7745 N. Moore Rd

Littleton, CO 80125 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

80-0236203

NTEE code info

Foster Care (P32)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

For centuries animals have been in service to humans. We feel all beings have the right to a safe place to live, we provide that space. At All Souls Rescue AKA Zuma's Rescue Ranch we are providing both rescue and sanctuary for equines and all other species that have been cast off from their homes and in need of sanctuary. We take owner surrendered animals, auction lot saves, and abandon or seized animals into the sanctuary and provide rehabilitation and rehoming services for these animals. Those souls that have been too badly damaged become permanent residents of the sanctuary and assist humans in our animal assisted therapy programs. Our therapy programs serve the needs of troubled children, families and veterans.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Experiential Learning Programs

Providing alternative learning opportunities for children with learning differences, behavioral challenges and emotional deficits.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Victims and oppressed people

This is the costs associated with rescuing and caring for our equine therapy partners. without our equine therapy partners we are just another therapy center for at risk youth. It is the presence of the horse that makes what we do possible.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
People with psychosocial disabilities

Where we work

Awards

Spirit Service Award 2010

Greenwood Village Chamber of Commerce

Everyday Hero Award 2010

Channe 7

Accredidation 2010

Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries

Animal Rescuer Award 2012

American Red Cross

Ethics in Business Nominee 2012

Rotary Club Golden Colorado

Affiliations & memberships

MENTOR: National Mentoring Partnership - Respondent 2008

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals with freedom from hunger and thirst

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Sanctuary

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is reflective of the animals in shelter with us in the given years. Not to mention the animals we rescue in place and provide feed for owners struggling to feed their animals

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

It is the intention of the organization to rescue animals from abuse, abandonment and or neglect and rehabilitate them. Once the full rehabilitation process has been completed these horses will go on to partner with humans in equine education and equine therapy roles.
Our programs give once though useless animals active roles in the many animal centric industries in the US. By expanding the animal assisted therapy world, more animals have roles in revenue generating organizations helping troubled children.
Our operations will continue to experience program growth in all areas benefiting both animals and humans.

The strategy of our organization is to balance both the needs of animals and humans while providing effective and revenue-generating programs.

We have been Medicaid approved to provide service to more of our population in need, we have also begun to take insurance from various providers

We are in the development stages of building Colorado's first nonprofit large animal hospital to help animals in need.

The central location of Zuma's Rescue Ranch provides ease of access for volunteers, donors and program participants to support continued program growth. A non profit with succinct mission based revenue stream in programming lightens the load of contribution needs, making the operations more sustainable.

Zuma's has continually experienced program growth year over year for the entirety of operations.
in 2015 after our research has proven that 80% of our program participants have gone from sever symptoms on the trauma scale to negligible symptoms. This is an 80% success rate for our mental health programs.

We have sustained a 95% success rate for our equine rescue efforts, having a less than 5 percent return rate on horse placed in forever homes.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Children, families, teens, Veterans, women, mental health clients of all backgrounds/ethnicities/needs, etc.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Notes to Program Director/Executive Director from verbal or email conversations,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    A client recently expressed her experience with one of our riding instructors leaving for another job. She was upset at the organization about the change that was out of the organization's hands, and both the Program Director & Executive Director reached out to explain the whole story, that there were no hard feelings on our end toward this employee. In this conversation, she stated a few things on how to improve some of our programs to increase adult participation (instead of mainly for kids/teens) and we have since created a few new classes to appeal to adult women!

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By working with the people we serve to provide them with the types of services and/or classes that they are looking for, we have increased retention and client happiness. Our mission is all about mental health and working in partnerships with our animals, so ensuring that our clients, students, volunteers, etc. are heard and that their opinions matter has created an increase in relationships and retention in all programs.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Zumas Rescue Ranch
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Zumas Rescue Ranch

Board of directors
as of 3/10/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Victoria Digiannantonio

West Metro Fire

Term: 2021 - 2022

Paul Messenich

NTT Communications North America

Robyn Fergus

Jefferson County Schools

Tracy Vroom

Rocky Mountain School of Acupresser and Massage

Anna Tinni

Lumen

Regina Ramey

Cotiviti Inc.

Michelle Allard

Syntactic LLC

Colleen Mercer

Charter Communications

Johnathan Beals

Retired. US Marine

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/19/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.