Youth Development

Boys to Men Tucson, Inc.

Strengthening communities in Southern AZ by calling on men to step up to mentor teenaged boys on their journeys towards healthy manhood

aka The Desert Men's Council, Inc.

Tucson, AZ

Mission

Our mission is to strengthen communities in Southern Arizona by recruiting, training, and empowering communities of men to mentor teenage boys on their journey towards healthy manhood through on-site group-mentorship circles, adventure outings, and contemporary rites of passage.

Ruling Year

2010

Executive Director

Mr. Michael Brasher

Main Address

5925 E Broadway Blvd Ste 125

Tucson, AZ 85711 USA

Keywords

Group Mentoring

EIN

80-0432852

 Number

7206473855

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

There’s an African proverb that states that if you don’t initiate boys into manhood, they will burn down the village just to feel the heat. Many of the greatest social and political problems we face today are related to crises over manhood. When a young boy grows up without positive, reliable male role models in his life, he is at increased risks related to violence, mental health, and addiction. Despite this fact, the problem of fatherlessness and abusive, or absent, men continues to increase: our boys need our help. One reliable predictor of whether a boy will succeed or fail in high school rests on a single question: does he have a man in his life to look up to? Too often, the answer is no. The consequences can be devastating for all of us. Since 1960 the rate of U.S. boys without fathers has quadrupled. We know that 85% of youths in prisons grew up in a fatherless home. The determinate factor in what kind of man a teenaged boy becomes is his access to older, healthy, reliable men.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

School-Based Mentoring Program (SBM)

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of children who access our free programs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Males,

Adolescents (13-19 years),

At-risk youth

Related program

School-Based Mentoring Program (SBM)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Children who regularly access our programming, primarily through school-based mentorship circles, but also through community-based activities such as adventure outings and adventure weekends.

Number of mentors recruited

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Males,

Adolescents (13-19 years),

At-risk youth

Related program

School-Based Mentoring Program (SBM)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

This is the total number of screened, trained, mentors that we have on our rolls. These mentors deliver group mentorship circles as well as help us to staff our community-based programs.

Number of schools requesting our programs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Males,

Adolescents (13-19 years),

At-risk youth

Related program

School-Based Mentoring Program (SBM)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Schools that have currently adopted our group mentorship circles. This number should grow consistently each year as we expand our reach.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Across times and cultures, men of tribes and communities have shared a collective responsibility to facilitate rite of passage journeys for young men that initiate them into their healthy, responsible identities as men of the community. At Boys to Men Tucson, we are spearheading a call to the men of Southern Arizona to re-discover this mandate. Our vision is to strengthen communities by calling men to step up to mentor all teenage boys on their journey towards healthy manhood. Our goal is to spearhead a movement across Southern Arizona whereby men step into their collective responsibility to mentor the next generation of responsible, caring men because we know that when communities prioritize healthy intergenerational manhood everybody benefits. We aim to plant Boys to Men Group Mentorship circles throughout the city of Tucson so that all boys have access to healthy, reliable, consistent adult male mentorship. Because our primary method for facilitating these connections between boys and men take place in schools, our goal is to be in every school district, and eventually every high school in Tucson.

We accomplish our vision by recruiting, training, and empowering communities of men to mentor teenage boys through on-site circles, adventure outings, and contemporary rites of passage. Most of our on-site group-mentoring processes take place in the boys' schools, although we also facilitate weekly mentorship circles with teenaged boys in the Juvenile Detention Center. With our core, three-program approach, boys are finding ways to connect to the good men of Boys to Men Tucson, having fun, and benefiting from their involvement. Our Site-Based Mentoring program provides teenaged boys with regular contact with responsible men and supports these boys in many ways. In our school groups men help boys develop their general social skills, improve their ability and willingness to work with peers, build their self-esteem, improve their ability to manage anger and conflict, improve their academic performance, lower the frequency of school absenteeism, and increase their understanding of the consequences of their personal decisions. Our adventure outings are a year-round series of fun, educational, and motivational events, both in the greater Tucson community and in surrounding wilderness areas. They provide unique opportunities for young men to learn about collaboration, leadership, and other elements of positive manhood. Events include hikes, sporting events, life skills training, visiting men’s workplaces, service projects and museum visits, etc. Finally, our contemporary rites of passage events take places through what we call our Challenge Adventure Weekends. These Boys to Men weekends offer extended time with a large group of committed men. The goal is to provide the boys with a weekend of fun events, challenge activities, and opportunities to consider a variety of important life choices. There is a “line-crossing” ceremony at the end of the weekend designed to mark an intentional stepping away from childhood and in to an intentional quest for a healthy, responsible, and positive manhood in the context of a supportive community.

Tucson is a fantastic place to do this work, as their has been a long history of fruitful and productive men's work in our city. As a result, we rely on a constantly growing volunteer army to do this work. With roughly 60 active volunteer mentors at any time, we are tapping into the wealth of men who are open to hearing this call and showing up for the next generation. We have an effective curriculum for training these mentors which has been studied and validated for its impact on teenaged boys by a recent Case Study at the University of San Diego. We also have a series of MOU's and endorsements from the city's largest School Districts and most influential Superintendents. Our reputation has meant that demand continually outpaces our capacity as we seek to recruit new mentors.

We have a variety of indicators that we use to measure our impact. At each school circle, twice a year, we administer a voluntary pre-and-post activity development asset profiles help self-assess the impact that attending school circles has on the participating, teenaged boys. The most recent surveys indicated that the SBM Program is proving effective in raising the self-esteem and individual resiliency of student participants. We also have received a grant to design and implement a participant-centered feedback loop that allows our boys to inform and instruct us about how our programming does and doesn't work. We are also gauging our success through the consistent of new schools and new mentors each semester. As our goal is to be in every school and to ensure our mentorship circles are accessible to all boys in the community, the steady, consistent expansion into new schools each semester reflects to us every few months whether or not we are staying focused on our goal.

One year ago, we were in eight schools. Today we are in eleven. Next semester we will add at least three more schools, and we have a waitlist of about five more. This semester we were invited to pilot our programming for the boys in the Juvenile Detention Center, so we are there every two weeks facilitating group mentorship circles. In the next six months we also intend to pilot a community-based circle in a central part of town, so that boys whose schools we are not yet in can still access our weekly support model. This Spring we will facilitate a Rite of Passage Adventure Weekend for the boys in our program.

External Reviews

Photos

Financials

Boys to Men Tucson, Inc.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/01/2020

Leadership

No data

Race & Ethnicity

No data

Gender Identity

No data

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

No data