PLATINUM2023

City Fruit

aka City Fruit   |   Seattle, WA   |  www.cityfruit.org

Mission

City Fruit stewards and harvests from urban fruit trees, prioritizing quality fruit to share equitably among neighbors, supporting the growth of a sustainable and accessible food system for all Seattle residents.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Kara Martin

Main address

4000 Aurora Ave N Suite #123

Seattle, WA 98103 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

80-0579830

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Food insecurity has continued to increase in the Seattle community, remaining higher than pre-pandemic years. Rates of food insecurity are continuing to increase due to inflation, causing applications for food stamps and food bank visits to rise. Food banks and hunger relief organizations are experiencing a higher demand for services, but reductions in federal assistance limit their purchasing capacity, making it difficult to meet the growing needs within our community. Before our work, Seattle fruit trees often went unharvested, and fruit that could be enjoyed by the community was wasted. By harvesting from local fruit trees and distributing fruit directly to food banks, we are helping to offset the burden and limitations food banks face in purchasing organic fruit, and reduce food insecurity within our community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Harvest Program

Through our Harvest Program, we harvest roughly 30,000 - 40,000 pounds of fruit annually -- good fruit that would otherwise go to waste -- and redirect this quality, local fruit throughout Seattle so it can be shared with the community. Harvesting produce from public and residential fruit trees reduces food waste and increases access to hyper-local, organic fruit. Before our work, extra fruit from many local fruit trees went unharvested, and nutritious food that could be enjoyed throughout the community was wasted. Our Harvest Program builds on community assets by partnering with existing local organizations and hunger relief organizations to distribute harvested fruit within the Seattle community and reduce local food insecurity.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Children and youth

Our Community Outreach and Education Program aims to cultivate youth stewards, future orchardists, and environmental champions. Many Seattle residents are unaware that public orchards exist or that these orchards provide food in our community. City Fruit creates an opportunity to learn and engage in public spaces and understand how local food systems can be sustainable. We believe education in food justice and our food system is vital to achieving necessary change and have integrated those concepts into our outreach.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Through our Tree Care Services Program, we ensure fruit trees stay healthy all year. Our Tree Care Specialists provide services such as mulching, pruning, and integrated pest management for residential fruit tree owners and in public orchards alongside community orchardists. As a sustainable line of business, we offer tree care assessments and services at a below-market rate of $85 per hour, but if cost is a barrier, these services are often provided for free. Each year, we provide year-round care for more than 400 trees.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Best Seattle Non-profit 2011

Edible Seattle magazine

Best of Seattle edition: Urban Fruit Savior 2010

Seattle Weekly newspaper

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Harvest Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Education & Outreach Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Harvest Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1) Join communities together in celebration of hyper-local fruit.

2) Contribute to the growth of our local, community-driven food system.

3) In partnership with community, co-design education and skill-training opportunities related to urban agriculture.

4) Promote the stewardship and care of our urban fruit canopy year-round.

Our volunteers and staff perform tree care activities in public orchards. We have 600-1,000 volunteers in any given year, who help with tree pruning, netting, and harvesting. We host volunteer work parties in public orchards on the majority of weekends throughout the year.

We have staff who support tree owners with tree care and maintenance. Tree owners can request an assessment of their tree, whereby they receive detailed information about how to care for their tree to maximize quality fruit. We also help with pruning and netting trees, to keep trees healthy and producing good fruit.

In summer months, our staff increases with the addition of seasonal harvesters and interns who harvest hundreds of trees on public orchards, private yards, and parking strips. We also have a U-pick program -- we drop off empty crates, tree owners pick the fruit, and then we pick up the loaded crates. City Fruit staff work with local nonprofits and community groups to determine where the fruit is most needed.

We also host a series of pop-up fruit stands (aka Fruit for All events) in various Seattle neighborhoods, providing a direct distribution channel for fresh fruit within our community. These fruit stands are primarily co-located with farmers markets hosted by Seattle's Department of Neighborhoods in underserved neighborhoods.

Our education activities include adult and youth learning. Our adult education is primarily in the form of our Master Fruit Tree Steward certification program. Participants undergo intensive training on tree care over the course of 5 months. Our youth education program is reserved for summer months; we host educational camps and workshops in Seattle's public orchards, in partnership with several youth-focused organizations.

We have a small staff, a large volunteer base, and a growing number of Master Fruit Tree Stewards (75 graduates and counting) available to support this work.

City Fruit works in partnership with the City of Seattle's Urban Food Systems program and other community groups to manage fruit trees in public spaces.

City Fruit was founded in 2008. The organization has transitioned from an all-volunteer grassroots organization, which was fiscally sponsored by another organization, into an independent 501(c)(3) organization with a year-round staff. We have worked to improve the quality of fruit grown and harvested in Seattle, and the percentage of harvested fruit that is edible has increased dramatically. (It's now over 85%.) We have also worked to be a strong community partner and to redistribute the food to members of our community who can really use it. Accordingly, we try to identify neighborhoods and populations with higher needs and prioritize sharing fruit with them.

Our 5-year plan includes deepening our ties with community partners, growing the tree canopy in Seattle, expanding public orchards in Seattle, and mapping fruit tree locations city-wide. We also seek to include more neighbors in the management of fruit trees and enjoyment of fruit in our shared public orchards. We are working to build an orchard stewardship council, which would be comprised of representatives from every neighborhood that is home to a public orchard.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

City Fruit
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

City Fruit

Board of directors
as of 11/14/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Leslie Llado

Splash

Term: 2020 - 2025

Patrick Gordon

Deloitte Consulting

Lamai Cox

PCC Markets

Michael Kim

Amazon

Rivers Townes

Salesforce

Erik Madrid

Mitchell Medical Consultants Network

Jason Giroir

Amazon Kitchen

Kathleen O'Leary

Workforce Snohomish

BJ Bell

BlackRock

Maya Monroe

Sprague Israel Giles, Inc

Leslie Llado

Splash

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/14/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/28/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.