Youth Development

Restoring the Path

Restore the path. Rebuild the streets.

aka Crushers Club

Chicago, IL

Mission

Our mission is to be the strongest alternative to gangs. We arm young people with the support and skills they need to restore their lives and improve their neighborhood. Crushers Club is rooted in four ideals - respect, discipline, ownership, and love - that give our members a fighting chance. The Crushers Club theory of change – reflecting learnings from program delivery and the field’s best practices – is to harness the same tactics used by gangs in order to redirect and stabilize high-risk male youth rather than incarcerating them. Approximately 85% of the Club’s justice-involved youth do not re-offend, in stark contrast to the state average in which 85% of justice-involved youth do re-offend within three years.

Ruling Year

2012

President and Executive Director

Ms. Sally Hazelgrove

Main Address

1406 W 64th St

Chicago, IL 60636 USA

Keywords

Englewood, youth, high-risk, at-risk, mentoring, opportunity, violence prevention, gangs

EIN

80-0724941

 Number

7232285012

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Delinquency Prevention (I21)

IRS Filing Requirement

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Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

Sally Hazelgrove has worked in Englewood since 2000, when she started volunteering at the neighborhood’s Juvenile Evening Reporting Center, which was developed to serve local juvenile offenders who would otherwise be held at the Juvenile Temporary Detention Center. Sally began to systematically study gang operations to better understand recruitment tactics and reward systems. In 2003, she started interviewing gang members in Chicago's Harold Ickes Homes, then a public housing project home to a notoriously violent criminal enterprise. Each time she asked a gang member why he stayed in the gang when he knew it would lead to death or prison, the answer always included two words: “love” and “respect.” In 2004, Sally Hazelgrove surveyed many gang-affiliated youth in Englewood, asking them what would get them off the streets. Boxing was the top answer, becoming Crushers Club’s first programming platform, with music eventually became the second platform.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Crushers Club

Where we workNew!

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

Restoring the Path aims for Crushers Club to be the strongest alternative to gangs by providing high-risk youth with the support and tools needed to restore their lives and improve their communities. We seek to maintain and improve up on the meaningful outcomes Crushers Club has achieved, including the low recidivism rate for Crushers youth and the low-cost of redirecting high-risk youth in comparison to the high cost of juvenile incarceration. In addition to violence prevention/reduction outcomes, other valuable outcomes have included rising GPA's, fewer incidents of defiance at home/school (90% of parents report improved behavior), improved relations with officers of the Chicago Police Department and community leaders, and a productive sense of purpose in the community.

Just as gangs use a military model of leadership, at Crushers Club, small groups of the youngest members (ages 7-13) are mentored by older youth (ages 14-18), who are in turn monitored by adult Detention Reduction Program mentors. We create a network of peers allowing for safe exploration of talents and self-expression, without the threat of ridicule or violence. As with a gang, Crushers Club is a second family and somewhere to turn in a crisis. The Crushers believe that discipline and hard work are required to win both inside and outside the ring. The youth learn the power they have over their own decisions and that they alone own their actions. The Club restores high-risk male youth to a sustainable place of personal stability, maturity, responsibility, and character, as they develop life/job/leadership skills, disciplined thought and action, and commitment to positive goals.

Crushers Club’s adult mentors either grew up or live in Englewood or have other personal connections to the neighborhood, while also being racially reflective of the youth served by the Club – giving them valuable, authentic “first person voice” when working with the youth. Crushers personnel receive opportunities for professional development and convenings where best practices for the field are shared (Cook County Juvenile Probation Department, etc.). Cook County honored Sally Hazelgrove with their 2017 “Woman of the Year” Award for her work with youth on probation. In April 2018, FBI Director Christopher Wray presented Ms. Hazelgrove with the “Director’s Community Leadership Award,” the highest recognition the FBI awards a civilian.

Crushers Club regularly obtains feedback from youth participants, parents, school representatives (administrators and teachers), community leaders, Cook County Juvenile Probation Department (including probation officers), and the Chicago Police Department. Crushers aims to achieve impact at the following levels: community-level change (safer community, stronger relationships between police and community); family-level change (strengthened support system for families, parents’ increased sense of safety); and community program-level change (increased inter-program partnerships, more collaborative efforts between youth and probation officers).

Approximately 85% of the Club’s justice-involved youth do not re-offend, in stark contrast to the state average in which 85% of justice-involved youth do re-offend within three years. The Club prides itself on its ability to redirect youth at a fraction of the high cost of juvenile incarceration. Crushers’ far higher success rate is achieved for less than $5,000 per child per year, compared to approximately $90,000 per child per year for juvenile incarceration. In addition to violence prevention/reduction outcomes, other valuable outcomes have included rising GPA's, fewer incidents of defiance at home/school (90% of parents report improved behavior), improved relations with officers of the CPD and community leaders, and a productive sense of purpose in the community. Crushers is collaborating with an independent researcher on a study that will inform Crushers' program development/refinement efforts going forward - an essential step prior to expanding to a larger program site.

External Reviews

Financials

Restoring the Path

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Not Applicable

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Not Applicable

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Not Applicable

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable