FRIENDSHIP HOUSE OF CHRISTIAN SERVICE

aka Friendship House   |   Billings, MT   |  http://www.friendshipmt.org/

Mission

To reflect the love of Jesus Christ by fostering renewal, stability, and transformation in the lives of youth and families in South Billings.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Matthew Lundgren

Main address

3123 8th Avenue South

Billings, MT 59101 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-0300497

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Youth Centers, Clubs, (includes Boys/Girls Clubs)- Multipurpose (O20)

Christian (X20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Friendship House of Christian Service is working to reflect the love of Jesus Christ by fostering renewal, stability and transformation in the lives of children and families in South Billings, MT. We seek to end the entrenched generational poverty and its ill effects of family dysfunction, abuse, crime, and violence so prevalent in our Billings' south side neighborhood. We accomplish this through our five core programs including: 1) Preschool for children ages 3-5, 2) Youth After School and Summer Enrichment for ages 5-12, 3) Teen Programs - Friendship Cafe and Open House for ages 13-19, 4) Adult Life Skills Education for parents and neighbors, and 5) Child, Adult, and Family Counseling.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

After School and Summer Enrichment

After School and Summer Enrichment programming for K-6th grade at-risk students and their impoverished families. Our program is designed to be intentionally academic and character building. Two Sites: Friendship House and Orchard Elementary.

Population(s) Served

Financial Literacy, Parenting, Cooking, First Time Home Buyers, Support and Recovery Groups, and others

Population(s) Served

Kindergarten readiness program for children ages 3-5 and their low-income, impoverished families.

Population(s) Served

Friendship Cafe; Open Gym

Population(s) Served

For enrolled Children and Families

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

First and foremost, we seek to build leaders and provide holistic community development from a faith-based perspective. To accomplish this we provide a safe, academically enriching environment for disadvantaged youth ages 3-12. Research consistently shows that the most vulnerable time for school-aged children in regard to abuse, experimentation with drugs and sexual intercourse, and juvenile delinquency is between the hours of 2:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. during the school week (After School Alliance, 2010). This is especially true for Friendship House's target population – at-risk youth – who traditionally have less supervision in the home and greater opportunity to be victimized or engage in illicit activities. More than 28 million kids in the United States have parents who work outside the home during critical out-of-school hours. (Center for Children & Families, 2011)

Second, our program seeks to end the cycle of generational poverty in neighborhood youth and thereby reduce the deficits mentioned above. Our Programs utilize a 5-pronged approach to curbing the entrenched cycle of generational poverty in youth and families:
1. Encourage and augment healthy adult/child relationships and build a strong support network for children and families.
2. Provide tangible, individual academic assistance that meets specific developmental deficiencies for each child.
3. Teach and model healthy social and emotional skills through mentoring and character development initiatives.
4. Provide opportunities to expand a student's horizons in the realms of education, culture, faith and career development.
5. Showcase the value of school success and adult learning by giving students the tools needed to succeed and stay in school through High School graduation and beyond.

In addition to providing much needed academic, social, and emotional support, our Programs also meets a critical need for low-income parents. A common barrier to steady employment for parents is a lack of access to childcare, or an inability to afford childcare. When struggling parents have access to quality, affordable care for their children, they are more able to get jobs, further their own education, and keep the jobs they have. By asking families enrolling in our programming to pay fees to invest in their own development based on their income, we are solving a real and immediate problem for parents and making it more affordable for them to provide care for their children and for parents to get the education that will allow them to succeed.

In order to engage youth and adults in our programming we will employ the following strategies: 1. Provide valuable educational and counseling outcomes through quality instruction and verifiable results. 2. Provide desirable educational programming and counseling services through neighborhood, parent, & child survey input and verify attendance to support program choices. 3. Provide quality educational programming and counseling through low student to teacher ratios- 10-1, and one on one, family and group counseling and mentoring services. 4. Provide adequate financial support through pursuing donations, grants, contracts and endowment investments. 5. Provide adequate facilities needs through regular maintenance, building expansion, and pursuing additional locations to serve. 6. Provide exceptional oversight and service through recruiting outstanding staff, volunteers and board members and providing outstanding training and support. 7. Engage 10 new community partners to collaborate in our efforts.

Through training and continuous improvement, we seek to have the best-prepared staff to meet the needs of our programming. To accomplish this, all staff and volunteers have passed extensive state and federal background checks, are vetted by the Montana Early Childcare Services Bureau, have current immunizations on file and receive more than 20 hours of childcare specific professional development training each year.

Additionally, we expand our capacity through our partnerships with more than 20 agencies/organizations to provide additional educational and support services to assist our Preschool students and their families: Family Tree Center, Family Support Network, Riverstone Health, 4-H, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, First Interstate Bank, Home Center, First Tee, Billings Martial Arts, Billings Fencing Club, First Baptist Church, First United Methodist Church, Faith Chapel, Emmanuel Baptist, First English Lutheran Church, American Lutheran Church, Family Services Inc., Billings Public Library, Yellowstone Art Museum and others.

As we noted above in “How we know if we are making progress," we have met and exceeded our academic, social, and emotional goals for all of our programs. Similarly, we recently completed a major facility upgrade and remodel. Because of the tremendous support of our partners it is debt free.

Friendship House's next goal is to systemically collaborate across organizations to create greater community impact. We have begun this phase with the partnership of Montana Rescue Mission to create the Billings Leadership Foundation. The BLF will provide management and services to its respective organizations. In this way, Friendship House reduces administrative overhead, making our donors dollars go farther.

Financials

FRIENDSHIP HOUSE OF CHRISTIAN SERVICE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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FRIENDSHIP HOUSE OF CHRISTIAN SERVICE

Board of directors
as of 03/30/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Josh Charette

Great Plains Gathering

Term: 2013 - 2019

Eric Peterson

Avitus Group

Greg Peterson

Northwest Pipe Fittings Inc.

Mark Bauer

First Interstate Bank

Matt Lundgren

Friendship House of Christian Service

Josh Charette

Great Plains Gathering

Cory Bruce

Wells Fargo

Shawna Bonini

White Rock Oil and Gas

Milford Burke

Kreative Kapers Catering

Rusty Davies

Billings Clinic

Patty Duckworth

American Baptist Churches Northwest

Lisa Jensen

D.A. Davidson

Tim Mascarena

Metro Realtors

Char Pollington

Retired

Kristin Rapacz

Retired

Doug Wagner

Wells Fargo

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes