Human Services

Missoula Aging Services

aka Missoula Area Agency On Aging   |   Missoula, MT   |  www.missoulaagingservices.org

Mission

Missoula Aging Services promotes the independence, dignity and health of older adults and those who care for them.

Ruling year info

1980

Chief Executive Officer

Susan Kohler

Main address

337 Stephens Ave

Missoula, MT 59801 USA

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EIN

81-0379543

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

Meals on Wheels (K36)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Missoula Aging Services was established in 1982 as a nonprofit organization that exists a) To provide urgently needed human services and volunteer opportunities to older adults, b) Advocate on behalf of older adults to be sure their voices and needs are heard, and c) Serve as a vital community resource and educator on critical aging issues. Standing in the gap between government and for profit businesses, Missoula Aging Services' Mission is to promote the independence, dignity and health of older adults and those who care for them.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Montana SMP

ADVOCATES IN MEDICARE SAVINGS - REDUCES MEDICARE WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE IN MONTANA.

Population(s) Served
Aging, elderly, senior citizens

SENIOR SERVICE PROGRAMS (RETIRED SENIOR VOLUNTEER PROGRAM- RSVP, FOSTER GRANDPARENTS, SENIOR COMPANIONS, AND WESTERN MONTANA VOLUNTEER CENTER) - RSVP ENCOURAGES SENIORS TO USE THEIR SKILLS AND LIFE EXPERIENCE TO HELP SERVICE AGENCIES ADDRESS CRITICAL NEEDS IN THEIR COMMUNITIES. FOSTER GRANTPARENTS OFFERS SENIORS AGE 60 AND OVER THE OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE AS MENTORS AND TUTORS FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH SPECIAL NEEDS.

Population(s) Served
Aging, elderly, senior citizens
K-12 (5-19 years)

NUTRITION PROGRAMS - PROVIDE NOURISHING MEALS TO OVER 1,600 SENIORS IN MISSOULA COUNTY THROUGH THE MEALS ON WHEELS, CONGREGATE SITES, SENIOR DINER CLUB, COMMODITIES SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM, AND THE SENIOR FARMERS' MARKET NUTRITION PROGRAM. IN FISCAL YEAR 2008 THESE PROGRAMS SERVED 152,412 MEALS.

Population(s) Served
Aging, elderly, senior citizens
People with disabilities

INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE - THE SENIOR HELP LINE, RESOURCE CENTER, OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM, CARE MANAGEMENT SERVICE, AND FAMILY CAREGIVER SUPPORT PROGRAM PROVIDE VARIOUS SERVICES TO THE ELDERLY AND THEIR CAREGIVERS.

Population(s) Served
Aging, elderly, senior citizens
Caregivers

The Respite Program works one-on-one with primary caregivers and their families to create a holistic program that provides support, advocacy, education and resources.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Aging, elderly, senior citizens

The Veterans Directed Home and Community Based Services Program empowers qualified veterans to hire, employ and supervise workers, known as personal care attendants, to help with daily needs.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of older adults and caregivers served in one year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of individuals helped in one year through all programs and services.

Percent of Respite and Homemaking Program survey participants (including older adults and their caregivers) that report that they believe without these services it would be difficult for them to remain at home.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens,Caregivers,People with disabilities

Related Program

Respite and Homemaking Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Respite and Homemaking program provides older adults assistance with housekeeping duties and their caregivers with time to take care of their own needs.

Total number of Meals on Wheels meals delivered along with a safety check each year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens,Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people,People with disabilities

Related Program

Nutrition Program / Meals on Wheels

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Meals were delivered to 851 housebound individuals by over 100 volunteer drivers.

Percent of Meals on Wheels annual survey participants rating the program as “very helpful” or “helpful” in helping them remain living independently in their home.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens,Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people,People with disabilities

Related Program

Nutrition Program / Meals on Wheels

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Most common diagnosis of clients: Arthritis, depression, anxiety, diabetes, Congestive heart failure, COPD, Cancer, Dementia or Alzheimer’s, fibromyalgia, bi-polar disorder, PTSD, Parkinson’s and MS.

Number of Veterans empowered to live in their own homes with independence and dignity.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults,Aging, elderly, senior citizens,Veterans

Related Program

Veteran-Directed Home and Community Based Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Veteran Directed Care program empowers qualified veterans in Missoula and Ravalli Counties to employ their own caretakers to help with daily needs, so they can continue to live in their own homes.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Goal 1 Develop innovative, sustainable services that reflect and support the mission and vision. Goal 2 Assure financial stability through diversified sustainable funding. Goal 3 Serve as the voice of older adults, adults with disabilities, and those who serve them by advocating, collaborating, and communicating in support of their needs. Goal 4 Develop and leverage volunteers to meet the needs of an aging population.

Goal 1 - Develop innovative, sustainable services that reflect and support the mission and vision. Strategy 1 Expand, strengthen and diversify services to meet identified community needs. Strategy 2 Develop volunteer and paid staff skill sets in support of community education for all ages on financial readiness. Strategy 3 Regularly evaluate programs and services for affordability, sustainability, efficiency and effectiveness. Goal 2 - Assure financial stability through diversified sustainable funding. Strategy 1 Challenge Board and MAS leadership to collectively establish and achieve reasonable annual financial goals for the next 3 years. Strategy 2 Acquire business development expertise to promote and educate about services. Strategy 3 Build-on the business plan for statewide financial services (406) through partnerships and contracts. Strategy 4 Create “brand awareness” by establishing a continuum of services that are affordable and accessible. Goal 3 - Serve as the voice of older adults, adults with disabilities, and those who serve them by advocating, collaborating, and communicating in support of their needs. Strategy 1 Actively build community-wide (organizations as well as individuals) awareness of needs and resources relating to aging, disability, and volunteer services. Strategy 2 Strengthen our referral system/network. Strategy 3 Assess effectiveness of our communication methods, etc., and improve strategies as needed. Strategy 4 Form Advisory Council. Strategy 5 Continue active listening strategies ensuring that all voices are heard. Goal 4 - Develop and leverage volunteers to meet the needs of an aging population. Strategy 1 Identify organizations that serve older adults and can be enhanced through volunteer opportunities. Strategy 2 Explore opportunities that promote fee for service connected to providing or managing volunteers.

We are passionate about our Mission, which is to promote the independence, dignity and health of older adults and those who care for them. We are thankful for the hundreds of collaborations and partners that make it possible for our organization to serve over 31,000 individuals each year. In 1965, Congress passed the Older Americans Act, signed by President Johnson. This established the Administration on Aging (AOA) and State Units on Aging (SUA). This was done in response to an increase in older Americans living beyond retirement. In 1973, Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) were created. In 1979, Missoula County Commissioners established a County Council on Aging (CCOA) which worked in conjunction with the Area Agency on Aging based in Kalispell. In 1982, Missoula County Commissioners established a private non-profit organization called Missoula Aging Services (MAS) and withdrew from the Kalispell Area Agency on Aging to become a single county Area Agency on Aging. In July 2003 Ravalli County Council on Aging (RCCOA) petitioned the State to align with Missoula Aging Services making us a multi-County Area Agency on Aging. For the past 32 years, Missoula Aging Services has promoted the independence, dignity and health of older adults, and those who care for them, through a wide variety of programs, services, advocacy, education and volunteer opportunities. Each year nearly 29,000 older adults, caregivers, family members and community members benefit from the many programs and services provided. In order to serve the most vulnerable, Missoula Aging Services must seek funding each year from individuals, businesses, foundations and corporations. Many of our highly trained staff members have been with the organization for over 10 years. For example, Susan Kohler, CEO, has been with Missoula Aging Services for over 30 years which demonstrates the organization's stability.

Indicators are reflected quantitatively, qualitatively and anecdotally. Programs are formally evaluated on an annual basis, and clients are surveyed informally throughout the year. Evaluation differs appropriately depending upon the program. For example, the Meals On Wheels program has profoundly impacted many of our client's lives in a lasting, positive way. One program participant wrote to tell us “I am so grateful. I don't know what I would have done without you." To assess effectiveness of the program, meal recipients take a survey each year to evaluate the quality of service they are receiving. In 2018, 99% of the clients indicated they have a healthier diet with the program. A full 94% felt the Meals On Wheels program has been important in helping them remain independent and living in their own home, which is much less expensive for them (and their communities) than being institutionalized prematurely.

We recently completed our Four Year Strategic Plan (2015 - 2019), with some accomplishments recorded across all Strategic Priorities including: addressing growing community needs in innovative ways, assuring financial sustainability, increasing advocacy on aging issues, building awareness of needs & resources, developing & leveraging volunteers, and strengthening administrative support to meet the needs of our growing programs & services. All progress has resulted in our ability to serve the ever increasing population of older adults in Missoula County, Montana. During the last year, we collaborated with board, staff, and community members to develop our current Strategic Plan (2020 - 2023).

Financials

Missoula Aging Services
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Missoula Aging Services

Board of directors
as of 11/22/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Larry Riley

Leslie Halligan

Larry Riley

Keith Anderson

Larry White

James McKay

Roberta Smith

Amanda Cahill

Kristin Page-Nei

Chris Flohr

Gayle Hudgins

Geoff Gilbert

Jolynn McDermott

Gwen Jones

Juanita Vero

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Keywords

Aging Services, rural Montana, meals on wheels, senors, older adults