PLATINUM2023

Montana Food Bank Network Inc.

aka MFBN   |   Missoula, MT   |  http://www.mfbn.org

Mission

Montana Food Bank Network's mission is to end hunger in Montana through food acquisition and distribution, education and advocacy.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Montana Food Bank Network's mission is to end hunger in Montana through food acquisition and distribution, education, and advocacy. MFBN has been feeding Montana since 1983. Our vision is a Montana free from hunger where everyone has equal access to nutrient-dense food. Montana Food Bank Network (MFBN) is Montana’s only statewide food bank and member of Feeding America. MFBN distributes food to over 340 partners that include community food banks, pantries, senior centers, shelters, and schools to end hunger in Montana. MFBN’s hunger relief programs include school backpacks for elementary students, Mail-a-Meals for individuals living in rural communities, Hunters Against Hunger, Retail Food Rescue, and SNAP outreach. MFBN advocates for long-term policy solutions to strengthen public nutrition programs and address the root causes of hunger.

Ruling year info

1984

Chief Executive Officer

Gayle Carlson

Main address

5625 Expressway

Missoula, MT 59808 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-0421243

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Montana Food Bank Network aims to assist those living with food insecurity in the state of Montana.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

BackPack Program

o The mission of the BackPack Program is to meet the needs of hungry children by providing them with nutritious and easy-to-prepare food to take home on weekends and school vacations when other resources such as school breakfast and lunch programs are not available.
o BackPack food is distributed discreetly in easily accessible and safe environments.
o MFBN involves additional resources and partners in order to assure sustainability of the program.
o MFBN currently provides BackPack meals at 93 sites in 38 communities throughout Montana.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

o Through a Montana Legislature bill, in conjunction with Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, hunters can donate funds to a pool used to process game animals for MFBN Partner Agencies.
o MFBN works with licensed meat processors across Montana, providing reimbursements for processing. Once an animal is processed, the local Partner Agency picks up the processed animal direct from the processor.
o During the 2014-2015 season, 38,280 pounds were donated through the program and received by 24 Partner Agencies.

Population(s) Served
Adults

o The purpose of a Mobile Food Pantry is to provide emergency food assistance and services to food insecure individuals in rural areas of Montana that may be underserved or lacking in local food pantries and full service grocery stores.
o Montana Food Bank Network works with local community volunteers to establish a regular schedule at a centralized location and supplies complete food box contents through a farmer’s market style distribution, or as a pre-packed food box.

Population(s) Served
Adults

o MFBN works with grocery stores to develop food rescue programs that provide food donations directly to local partner agencies. This is perishable food that is close to expiration date.
o In 2015, six grocery retailers donated over 4 million pounds of food to our partners in Montana.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

4 Stars on Charity Navigator 2011

4 Star Charity Navigator

4 Stars on Charity Navigator 2023

4 Star Charity Navigator

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America 1983

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of independent organizations served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

BackPack Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Montana Food Bank Network's mission is to end hunger in Montana through food acquisition and distribution, education and advocacy. Our vision is a Montana free from hunger where everyone has equal access to nutritious food.

Programs
• Partner Agencies
o Our partner agencies include over 200 community-based organizations across Montana such as soup kitchens, shelters, community programs, food pantries and senior centers.
o These Partner Agencies provide direct service to individuals and families in need by distributing food and grocery products to clients in their service areas.
o MFBN distributes over 8 million pounds of food across nearly 150,000 square miles.

• BackPack Program
o The mission of the BackPack Program is to meet the needs of hungry children by providing them with nutritious and easy-to-prepare food to take home on weekends and school vacations when other resources such as school breakfast and lunch programs are not available.
o BackPack food is distributed discreetly in easily accessible and safe environments.
o MFBN involves additional resources and partners in order to assure sustainability of the program.
o MFBN currently provides BackPack meals at 93 sites in 38 communities throughout Montana.

• School Pantry Program
o The mission of the School Pantry Program is to supply food and community assistance to students and families who are in need at school.
o In schools where a BackPack program is not the right fit, or additional resources are needed, School Pantries can fill the gap for older students and their families.

• Grocery Rescue Program
o MFBN works with grocery stores to develop food rescue programs that provide food donations directly to local partner agencies. This is perishable food that is close to expiration date.
o In 2015, six grocery retailers donated over 4 million pounds of food to our partners in Montana.

• Hunters Against Hunger
o Through a Montana Legislature bill, in conjunction with Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, hunters can donate funds to a pool used to process game animals for MFBN Partner Agencies.
o MFBN works with licensed meat processors across Montana, providing reimbursements for processing. Once an animal is processed, the local Partner Agency picks up the processed animal direct from the processor.
o During the 2014-2015 season, 38,280 pounds were donated through the program and received by 24 Partner Agencies.

• Mobile Food Pantry Program
o The purpose of a Mobile Food Pantry is to provide emergency food assistance and services to food insecure individuals in rural areas of Montana that may be underserved or lacking in local food pantries and full service grocery stores.
o Montana Food Bank Network works with local community volunteers to establish a regular schedule at a centralized location and supplies complete food box contents through a farmer's market style distribution, or as a pre-packed food box.

• Outreach and Advocacy for Public Food Programs Include:
o SNAP Outreach (formerly food stamps)
o School Breakfast Program
o Summer Food Service Program
o WIC

Through work with our partner agencies and programs we are extending our reach and service capacity everyday.

In Fiscal Year 2023, MFBN distributed over 14 million pounds of food through over 340 partner agencies.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Montana Food Bank Network Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Montana Food Bank Network Inc.

Board of directors
as of 06/07/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Matt Baldassin

Crowley Fleck

Term: 2022 - 2025

Scott Kessler

Northwest Farm Credit Services

Tiffani Swanson

First Security Bank

Keith Haas

LPL Investment

Kevin Condit

Neptune Aviation

Marie Hirsch

Arlee Community Development Corp

Jessica Proctor

A&E Design

Chris Ewing

Audaciter Group

Ross Tillman

Retired Attorney

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/22/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/19/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.