WINSTON-SALEM STREET SCHOOL

A road to hope

aka W.S.S.S.   |   Winston-Salem, NC   |  wsstreetschool.org

Mission

MISSION
The Winston-Salem Street School is dedicated to the belief that a quality education is the most effective way of transforming disenfranchised youth of our society into productive citizens.

Ruling year info

2003

Executive Director

Mr. Mike Foster

Main address

630 W. 6th Street

Winston-Salem, NC 27101 USA

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EIN

81-0566874

NTEE code info

Secondary/High School (B25)

Youth Community Service Clubs (O51)

Secondary/High School (B25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In Forsyth County, 400-500 students drop out of public high schools annually. The Winston-Salem Street School works diligently to not only reach those students, but create an environment and an alternative learning setting that allows them to succeed. The Street School realizes that there is not a cookie cutter approach to education and that some are just not meant to flourish in traditional public schools. Through small class sizes and flexibility in implementing programs in a different way, the Street School effectively makes a dent each year in the drop out rate in our community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Alternative High School

Full high school curriculum for 14-20 year olds, recognized by the State of NC and Forsyth County. Classes run M-F from 9:00 a.m. to 2:40 job opportunities, and career possibilities. P.E. and activities assisted by formal partnership with local YMCA. Over 200 graduates to date.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Where we work

Accreditations

Accredited by the National Association of Private Schools 2021

Affiliations & memberships

National Association of Private Schools 2021

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The primary goals of the Street School are:
- Reach at-risk high school age students in our community
- Offer those students the opportunity to earn an accredited high school diploma
- Show this population that there is a pathway to a bright and productive future
- Establish trust and buy-in from students to put forth 100% in our program

The key component to all reaching our goals as a educational institution is convincing our students that they have purpose, they have what it takes to succeed and they will put full trust in our program and staff. Like anything else in life, our students will only get out of the Street School experience what they put in. The program produces results...it is our job to make sure our students understand and strive for those results for themselves.

The Street School is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that receives no state or federal funds. Our operating budget is generated each year through private donations from individuals, businesses, churches and foundations. Being an accredited private school allows our organization to design a program that works for the population we serve. Flexibility in teaching and learning styles is key to the Street School's success and that translates to the support we receive from donors. We can only be as effective as the dollars we raise. With that said, donors, supporters and volunteers appreciate the Street School for it's ability to make such an impact in the community with limited resources.

Since 2004, 200 students have graduated from the Street School. Last year alone, 23 students received their diplomas. Our goal is to continue to reach these types of numbers, making a significant impact in the county's drop out rate.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    High school age students and young adults who have not succeeded in the traditional public school setting with earning and obtaining their diploma. The Street School provides a second chance for educational achievement and a fulfilling life after high school.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently had the opportunity to expand our operation, by transitioning our adult program to a satellite facility. This immediately providing enough space to increase our service capacity in the adult and high school programs by 25%. Feedback we had received over the last few years from prospective students, stakeholders, and community members encouraged our program to look at opportunities for growth to be able to serve more individuals.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has made us a stronger organization in every aspect.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

WINSTON-SALEM STREET SCHOOL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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WINSTON-SALEM STREET SCHOOL

Board of directors
as of 5/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Richard Harrington

Jimbo Galloway

Mike Foster

James Kluttz

Dean Powell

Jack Lynch

Marty Brown

Lee Bryan

Paige Dillon

Beth Day-Hairston

Melanie Holton

Ben King

Mona Lovett

Chris Martin

Telisha Roberts

Rob Showfety

Steve Strawsburg

Andy Ward

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/04/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/04/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.