INTERNATIONAL HEALTH EDUCATION FOR LOCAL PEOPLE

Educate. Empower. Equip.

aka International HELP   |   Charlotte, NC   |  http://intnlhelp.org/

Mission

International HELP envisions the end of preventable diseases in underprivileged areas globally through educating and empowering local people to be healthcare leaders, whose impact will change the course of their community.


We are a knowledge and capacity building organization, and are passionate about community involvement and ownership. We act as consultants, providing the health training for issues specific to the individual communities, namely those relating to nutrition, maternal health, water, sanitation and hygiene. We work with a local organization to create a health program with the people's involvement and innovation that will make the community stronger and more confident, giving the local people the responsibility and the tools to improve and control their health.

Notes from the nonprofit

Our core values are as follows: Empowerment through our work. Sustainability through our results. Integrity through our stewardship. Excellence in our actions. Unity in our team. We are always looking for people who believe in our missions and values to come alongside us and join our work, as we seek to change the world by ending preventable diseases, one community at a time. “Go to the people. Live among them. Learn from them. Love them. Start with what they know; build on what they have; but of the best leaders, when the job is done, the people will reply ‘we have done it ourselves.’”

Ruling year info

2016

Founder & CEO

Monterey Starkey

Main address

9106 Laurel Ridge Trl

Charlotte, NC 28269 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-0761256

NTEE code info

Community Health Systems (E21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

No child should die from a preventable disease. Yet every day 2,000 children die from diarrhea. Every community should have the life-saving knowledge of basic first-aid, maternal health care, and proper nutrition, sanitation and hygiene. However, in countless developing countries and underprivileged communities there is a gap in connecting these tools and knowledge to the people that need them. This is where Community Health Workers can come in and help bridge this gap. By partnering with an organization that is already established in the community to select a group of local people that live and understand their community, we then train this group of people to become catalysts of change within their communities. This group of trained Community Health Workers then work to educate others in their communities on these basic health education information that is lacking and connect them to the resources and facilities that many desperately need.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Health Workers in Montgomery County, MD

There is a large hispanic population in MD that struggles with dietary health issues. Many people in this community are unaware of what services are available.

By training Community Health Workers here, our goal is to provide health education, focusing on health problems specific to hispanic community and to train community health workers to connect hispanic community to resources.

Population(s) Served

International HELP trained 35 Community Health Worker’s on first aid, maternal health, basic nutrition, sanitation and water, as well as provided every community health worker with supplies to help their community prevent many diseases and illnesses such as high blood pressure and malnutrition.
We empowered the community health workers in the rural areas of Carrefour to engage in positive life changing healthcare practices and to share these practices with others.

Population(s) Served

International HELP worked to train 13 women in the Dalit community of rural India, educating them on first aid, taking vital signs, nutrition, maternal health, proper sanitation, and other relevant diseases. These volunteers were so eager to take their new knowledge to serve their rural villages, teaching other women the life saving health practices.

Population(s) Served

These 16 men and women were trained to provide basic first aid, to prevent infections, and to share proper sanitation, hygiene, and nutrition to their communities. They have partnered with the local clinic doctor to assist him in providing health services and health fairs to the rural communities.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We envision a world where no one dies from preventable diseases and where people are inspired to help their communities live healthier lives.

Our mission is to educate, empower and equip people in disadvantaged areas in need of healthcare solutions to be Community Health Workers — health leaders in their community.

We are passionate about community involvement and ownership. We never come into a community and tell them what they need. Instead, we work WITH them and learn what are the community’s greatest healthcare needs. This collaboration leads to sustainable results; but best of all, it gives the community a sense of pride knowing they are leading the change that will alter the course of the community.

We always begin a project working with a local community partner, such as a school, community group, or church, who is already a trusted member of the community.

We then conduct a thorough needs assessment to understand the root issues and cultural context contributing to the greatest health needs of that community.

Based on the results of the assessment, we create a program to train local volunteers who have been selected by their community to be Community Health Workers. They are taught how to prevent diseases and deaths, giving them the ability to help lead the other people in their community as well.

Lastly, we create a sustainable program through good monitoring and evaluation. The group of newly trained Community Health Workers continue to meet 1x a month to receive additional support, accountability, and training. This is also a time for the group to discuss the issues in their community and plan ways they can help.

By respecting the local cultures, conducting a thorough assessment of the health needs, and designing a targeted training program, we are able to built community trust and ownership while effectively training Community Health Workers.

Community Health Workers are uniquely situated as members of their community to be a bridge in this gap. By educating local people in a community, equipping them with health knowledge and basic first aid skills, these Community Health Workers are empowered to help improve health behaviors and prevent diseases and deaths. This education is powerful and something that can be passed on freely to friends and family, creating change for generations to come.

In the past 3 years, we have already trained 10 groups of Community Health Workers throughout 5 countries, educating, equipping and empowering almost 200 Community Health Workers.

In 2019, we are planning on training 100 new Community Health Workers in 5 new rural communities.

Financials

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH EDUCATION FOR LOCAL PEOPLE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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INTERNATIONAL HEALTH EDUCATION FOR LOCAL PEOPLE

Board of directors
as of 7/8/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Richard Lane

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable