JEWISH FERTILITY FOUNDATION INC

aka JFF   |   Atlanta, GA   |  https://www.jewishfertilityfoundation.org

Mission

The Jewish Fertility Foundation provides financial assistance, educational awareness, and emotional support to Jews who have medical fertility challenges.

Ruling year info

2016

Executive Director & Founder

Elana Frank MPA

Main address

1417 Mayson St NE

Atlanta, GA 30324 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-0789964

NTEE code info

Reproductive Health Care Facilities and Allied Services (E40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Jewish Fertility Foundation: Building Jewish Families and Strengthening Jewish Communities -The Jewish community embraces and celebrates families, but the journey to create those families can be fraught. Because family is so central to Jewish life, many individuals and couples experience tremendous stress and pressure when the path to parenthood is not so simple. Infertility remains taboo, something that, in many communities, is not talked about or openly acknowledged. When people dealing with infertility experience the Jewish community as steeped in pressure and cloaked in shame, the community can become something to avoid, a point of stress and anxiety, and not a refuge or place for connection and support. The Jewish Fertility Foundation (JFF) is changing the conversation – helping those who need extra support on the road to parenthood while helping to lessen the stigma of infertility.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

FERTILITY GRANTS:

FUNDING FERTILITY TREATMENTS: FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE: JFF offers grants of $1,000 - $15,000 for fertility treatments. Grants are awarded by an application process, with JFF’s Medical Advisory Council reviewing applications and determining the best candidates for successful treatment, and a Financial Qualifications Council helping determine grant amounts based on an objective set of financial criteria. JFF also arranges 20% discounts at participating fertility clinics (which are carefully vetted before acceptance to the JFF network) and facilitates interest-free loans from the local cities’ Hebrew Free Loan program. Loans to help cover the costs of diagnostic tests are also made available to those who do not receive grants. Between the grants, the discounts, and loans, most JFF grantees receive support worth at least $15,000-20,000.

Population(s) Served
Jewish people
People with diseases and illnesses

III. EDUCATION: Educational Programming - JFF educational programs are offered for people going through infertility and the people and organizations that support them. Topics of educational programs have included: Pathways to Parenthood, Getting Personal and Political about Infertility (in partnership with Hadassah); Loving Someone with Infertility; Intended Grandparents; Genetic Screening (with Jscreen); Legal Considerations of Egg/Sperm/Embryo Donation (with reproductive attorneys); and Infertility and Mental Health. JFF also has provided infertility education for rabbis and mikvah attendants, as well as reproductive physicians, nurses, and fertility clinic staff, helping them understand their patients’ needs from a Jewish perspective.

Advocacy and Speaking Engagements - JFF bolsters its educational efforts by advocating on behalf of those who are experiencing infertility and contributing its thought leadership to the field. JFF’s Founder and CEO has lent her voice and perspective to Jewish communal conferences, local TV and radio broadcasts, and podcasts dedicated to infertility issues. JFF also has been featured in both Jewish and secular newspapers. By speaking out about infertility in the Jewish community, and encouraging individuals and organizations to deepen their support for those who want to build families, JFF is shifting the communal conversation about this pervasive, painful issue.

Population(s) Served
Jewish people
People with diseases and illnesses

II. EMOTIONAL SUPPORT: Infertility can be emotionally-draining and socially-isolating. JFF’s provides confidential, caring emotional support through two signature initiatives:
Fertility Buddies - This peer support program matches new participants with individuals who already have been through the infertility process. “Veteran” Fertility Buddies take part in training with JFF social workers (including topics like boundary setting and listening skills) and commit to participating in the Fertility Buddies program for at least a year. They practice “relationship-based support,” consistently showing up for their Fertility Buddies and providing the freedom and space for them to process their experiences in a non-judgmental environment. By serving as Fertility Buddies, the veterans support their own healing process.

Support Groups - JFF social workers lead in-person support groups in Atlanta and Cincinnati and virtual support groups during COVID-19 via HIPPA Compliant, private telemental health groups. Support group topics include primary infertility, secondary infertility, moms after infertility, couples facing infertility, pregnant after infertility, mothers of donor-conceived children, and more.

Population(s) Served
Jewish people
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Awards

40 under 40 2017

Atlanta Jewish Times

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

EDUCATIONAL TRAININGS:

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Infertility Sensitivity Trainings for Community Leadership & Fertility Clinics

Number of clients participating in support groups

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

EMOTIONAL SUPPORT:

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Support Groups: monthly community-based support groups (avg attendance 4-9 women)

Fertility Buddy Program - # of matches

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Men and boys, LGBTQ people

Related Program

EMOTIONAL SUPPORT:

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fertility Buddies: people in Fertility Buddies program (peer-to peer support)

Database followers receiving information about our initiatives and financial assistance programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

FERTILITY GRANTS:

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

# of fertility grants awarded

# of live births

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

JFF’s Three-Pronged Approach to Helping Jewish People Create Families
JFF’s three-pronged approach – financial assistance, emotional support, and education – addresses the needs of the average Jewish person who is dealing with infertility. This includes financial constraints due to the high cost of fertility treatments, feeling alone in the fertility journey, the emotional stresses of failed attempts at conception and failed pregnancies, and grappling with the expectations of family, significant others, and the Jewish community at large. Some people may rely on one aspect of JFF’s support more than others, or their needs may shift over time. Some even take advantage of post-infertility JFF connections, such as support groups or assistance with brises or baby namings (which is especially helpful for those parents who are not members of synagogues). By providing supports for multiple aspects of the fertility process, JFF becomes a trusted partner and guide.

A Bold Approach to Accessing New Points of Jewish Life and Building Community
Infertility should not carry the emotional burden and pervasive taboo that it carries in the Jewish community. JFF has taken bold steps to change the narrative and ensure that the Jewish community is a welcoming and knowledgeable environment for those who struggle with infertility. JFF’s supports, programs, and partnerships provide a gateway to Jewish life, enabling participants to forge connections that will play out over months and years through Shabbat dinners, synagogue memberships, JCC programs, Jewish preschools and camps, and other venues that bring Jewish families together. Through JFF, we have the opportunity to respond to that need with a Jewish resource. Just as Honeymoon-Israel brings young Jewish couples into the Jewish community and the JCC Early Childhood Schools and Day Schools bring young Jewish families into the Jewish community, JFF provides another entree into our Jewish community at a critical inflection point. By supporting those facing medical infertility, emotionally and financially, we continue our important work of (literally) building vibrant, strong, and engaged Jews. And by educating our community leaders on the topic of infertility, we create new pathways to combat the stigma and shame of infertility. Through careful, strategic growth, and a model that ensures local sustainability, JFF is poised to expand its national presence, change Jewish culture, and help bring more Jewish children into the world.

JFF’s Three-Pronged Approach to Helping Jewish People Create Families

I. FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE: JFF offers grants of $1,000 - $15,000 for fertility treatments. Grants are awarded by an application process, with JFF’s Medical Advisory Council reviewing applications and determining the best candidates for successful treatment, and a Financial Qualifications Council helping determine grant amounts based on an objective set of financial criteria. JFF also arranges 20% discounts at participating fertility clinics (which are carefully vetted before acceptance to the JFF network) and facilitates interest-free loans from the local cities’ Hebrew Free Loan program. Loans to help cover the costs of diagnostic tests are also made available to those who do not receive grants. Between the grants, the discounts, and loans, most JFF grantees receive support worth at least $15,000-20,000.

II. EMOTIONAL SUPPORT: Infertility can be emotionally-draining and socially-isolating. JFF’s provides confidential, caring emotional support through two signature initiatives:
Fertility Buddies - This peer support program matches new participants with individuals who already have been through the infertility process. “Veteran” Fertility Buddies take part in training with JFF social workers (including topics like boundary setting and listening skills) and commit to participating in the Fertility Buddies program for at least a year. They practice “relationship-based support,” consistently showing up for their Fertility Buddies and providing the freedom and space for them to process their experiences in a non-judgmental environment. By serving as Fertility Buddies, the veterans support their own healing process.

Support Groups - JFF social workers lead in-person support groups in Atlanta and Cincinnati and virtual support groups during COVID-19 via HIPPA Compliant, private telemental health groups. Support group topics include primary infertility, secondary infertility, moms after infertility, couples facing infertility, pregnant after infertility, mothers of donor-conceived children, and mo

STAFFING MODEL:
The success of our organization has largely been a result of our paid professional staff. JFF’s current staff includes the CEO (is in charge of the exploratory committees), a part-time CFO, a National Program Director (who trains and supervised the City Managers and Advisory Councils), 2 part-time City Managers (Atlanta & Cincinnati), a part-time Lead Social Worker (who manages and liaises with two social work interns), a very part-time Development Associate, and infertility therapists who lead various support groups. The JFF Board of Directors has legal and fiduciary responsibility for the organization and includes people with expertise in law, accounting, fundraising, human resources, and other key fields. The Board is currently undergoing a transition from a Founders Board to a National Governance and Fundraising Board. The Board of Directors has four active committees: Human Resources, Governance, and Nominating, Finance and Development. JFF’s Medical Advisory Council (made up of reproductive endocrinologists from all partnering fertility clinics) and the Financial Qualifications Council (made up of accountants and people with financial expertise) operates independently of the Board of Directors; they review applications for JFF grants and determine the best candidates for infertility treatment, in order to disburse JFF fertility grants. JFF also relies on the expertise of its Jewish Professional Council, composed of Rabbis, Jewish educators, and others who help ensure that JFF programs remain grounded in Jewish values.

JFF’s TRACK RECORD (as of 12.23.21):
101 fertility grants valued at $915,690.00 grants, loans, and clinic discounts.
78 babies born to those receiving emotional and/or financial support.
48 babies on the way.
150 + Educational Events with 1,000+ attendees
150 + Fertility Buddies
600 + Support Group Attendees
9 Partner Fertility Clinics - including Shady Grove Fertility (Atlanta)
4 offices: JFF-Atlanta (2015), JFF-Cincinnati (2019) , JFF- Birmingham (2021), JFF-Tampa (2021)
Over 2.65 million dollars fundraised for JFF. Notable foundation partners include The Marcus Foundation, The Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati, The Zalik Foundation, The Natan Fund, and the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta.
Staff: CEO, CFO, National Program Director, Local City Managers, Development Director, Development Associate, Social Worker, Therapists, and Graduate School Social Work Interns.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

JEWISH FERTILITY FOUNDATION INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

JEWISH FERTILITY FOUNDATION INC

Board of directors
as of 1/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rachel Loftspring

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/26/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data