Public Safety, Disaster Preparedness and Relief

AMEDICAUSA INC

One village at a time...

Frederick, MD   |  www.amedicausa.org

Mission

AMEDICAusa is dedicated to providing Medical, Educational and Disaster Relief Aid to the poor and indigenous of Guatemala. We provide services to those in need, regardless of age, sex, race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or political or religious opinion or affiliation. Respect. Integrity. Community. Our mission is creating opportunities for the poor and indigenous people of Guatemala to help better their own lives and those of their children. AMEDICAusa does this in three ways, providing: Medical Care and Health Education Programs School Supplies and Educational Support Disaster Relief and Emergency Services Training and Equipment.

Ruling year info

2016

President

Neale Brown

Main address

619 Lee Pl

Frederick, MD 21702 USA

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EIN

81-0842688

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

Ambulatory Health Center, Community Clinic (E32)

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Guatemala, despite continued efforts at reform remains a third world country, with some 70% of it's citizens living at or below the poverty line. Over half live in extreme poverty, particularly the indigenous Maya peoples. Education and health care are poor and Guatemala is at severe risk for catastrophic natural disasters. Governmental resources for addressing these problems are scant, limiting the opportunities for these people to protect themselves and rise out of poverty.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Firefighter Training and Equipment

To provide training and equipment to the first responders of Guatemala, enabling them to effectively respond to disasters and other emergencies.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous people
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Budget
$10,000

Donation of Medical Equipment and providing medical Care and education in Guatemala.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Indigenous people
Budget
$10,000

Donating and distributing school supplies to the poor and indigenous Maya of Guatemala, as well as coordinating and assisting in the construction or improvements of those schools.

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)
Indigenous people
Budget
$10,000

Where we work

Awards

Monje Blanca Medal 2016

Government of Guatemala

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Emergency responders

Related Program

Firefighter Training and Equipment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of small group travelling fire and rescue training schools and our annual large scale schools.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Emergency responders

Related Program

Firefighter Training and Equipment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who received school supplies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

K-12 (5-19 years),Indigenous people,Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

Educational Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Tens of thousands of Guatemala's children can not afford to go to school because they simply can not afford simple, basic school supplies.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

AMEDICAusa believes that the most effective way to promote change is to partner with our communities and aid them in making the change from within. With that in mind, we have developed programs in cooperation with the local community leaders in three main areas:<br/><br/>Reduce the drop out rate and increase the attendance in our partner elementary schools, and increase the literacy rate in their communities.<br/><br/>Increase the level of, and accessibility to, medical care for the poor and indigenous in our service areas.<br/><br/>Provide training and equipment to the emergency services of Guatemala, allowing them to deliver more effective, and safer, response to disasters and emergencies.

Education: A recent Ministry of Education study confirmed our experience that tens of thousands of rural children were not able to attend school, even at the elementary level. The chief reason for this problem was found to be the expense and unavailability of basic school supplies for the schools and children. As education is one of the keys to reducing poverty and increasing opportunity, we are delivering the necessary school supplies directly to the children's hands in rural schools in our service areas and enabling them to continue their schooling.<br/><br/>Medical: Sick kids cannot go to school. Sick parents cannot provide for their children. As medical care is difficult to obtain in rural Guatemala, and medicines and equipment are in short supply in the facilities that do exist, we will provide such equipment and medications as is requested by the practitioners in our areas. Additionally, we provide medical education and missions to these areas, in consultation with the local hospitals and clinics.<br/><br/>Disaster response and Emergency Services: There are many international groups who are willing to respond in the event of a natural disaster, including AMEDICAusa. However, the sad fact is that they generally cannot mobilize and arrive on site within the first three days. Those first three days are critical. It is when lives and property are saved. AMEDICAusa's strategy is to train and equip the Guatemalan first-responding rescue agencies to enable them to respond safely and effectively during those first three days as well as to those more common, smaller incidents that do not garner international attention. We believe this to be the most effective disaster response.

Expertise: Each of our Board Members were selected for their specific qualifications and real world experience in their fields . International business, prior non-profit experience, disaster response, emergency and clinical medicine, firefighting and emergency response, project management, teaching, international government relations and long experience in Guatemala are just a few of the skill sets the Board brings to the table.<br/><br/>We are on the ground in Guatemala. This allows us to maintain an open line of communication between AMEDICAusa and the communities we serve, both to monitor progress and to adapt to the changing needs within our communities. It is amazing what can be accomplished when the local community participates in, and helps design, their own programs.<br/><br/>A core of committed native Guatemalan volunteers: Most of our volunteers are Guatemalans themselves, giving of their own time to help make their communities better. From firefighters volunteering on their days off to deliver school supplies in a rural school, to school teachers helping to get clean water to their villages, we have been able to recruit a strong corps of "on the ground" volunteers.<br/><br/>Close ties with the business and governmental communities: We have been able to forge and maintain contacts that enable us to deliver services at reduced cost and without many of the difficulties often encountered by NGO's in Central America. We buy most of our supplies at wholesale cost in Guatemala, at a very significant savings, and also saving shipping and importation fees that we would otherwise incur.

Education: Reducing the drop out rate and increasing the attendance and graduation rate of our partner elementary schools.<br/><br/>Medicine: Increasing the availability of basic medical care within our service areas and reducing the incidence of childhood disease.<br/><br/>Emergency Services: Increasing the availability of fire and rescue equipment in our service areas and reducing the numbers of firefighter injuries and fatalities.

Our efforts were even more effective in our first year of operations than we had hoped. <br/><br/> We reached 3500 elementary students in rural Guatemalan schools, exceeding our goal by more than 50%, and provided basic school supplies to children who would otherwise be unable to afford them. This expense is one of the most common reasons for children dropping out of school in Guatemala.<br/><br/>120 Fire Service instructors were trained in our annual Fire and Rescue school, two from each participating department, with an indirect reach to over two thousand firefighters, and perhaps tens of thousands of citizens. In addition, fire and rescue gear was provided to several fire departments and the UHR (National Rescue Service) that helps to expand their capabilities. A fully stocked ambulance was delivered to the Fire Department of Santa Cruz Mulua, and technical expertise and equipment were provided the Municipality of San Felipe to help them establish their first fire department, as well as obtaining a fire engine for them.<br/><br/>Medical Equipment donated to the National Hospital at Retalhuleu established their first complete OB/GYN clinic. Donations to other clinics included critically needed medications, equipment and training to staff to help them serve the poor and indigenous populations in their areas.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), case management notes, community meetings/town halls.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: we don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback.

Financials

AMEDICAUSA INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AMEDICAUSA INC

Board of directors
as of 6/1/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Neale Brown

AMEDICAusa,Inc

Term: 2015 - 2018

Silvana Ayuso

CHRIO Mission - Guatemala

Peter Oykhman

Core Partners, Inc.

Tracey Elizalde

South Mountain Health

Dane Galloway

Philadelphia Charter Schools

Gabriela Brown

CORE IMS

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/01/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Male, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/01/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Keywords

Firefighting, Disaster Relief, Education, Medicine, Charity, Mayan, Guatemala