ARTZ PHILADELPHIA

Opening doors to people living with dementia: looking at art together, talking about art together, making art together ... creating memories together.

Philadelphia, PA   |  artzphilly.org

Mission

ARTZ Philadelphia is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life and well-being of people living with dementia and their care partners through joyful interactions around arts and culture. Our evidence-based programs connect people with dementia and those they love with artists, cultural organizations and each other. We help to build caring, supportive communities that restore and preserve the self-esteem and ARTZ Philadelphia envisions a world in which people living with dementia and their care partners enjoy the benefits of well-being and quality of life that others enjoy. We are committed to ensuring equal access to the resources that enhance quality of life, inspire individual and communal creativity, and empower self-expression and continued self-realization.

Ruling year info

2016

Founder and Executive Director

Susan Shifrin PhD

Main address

1229 Chestnut St #188

Philadelphia, PA 19107 USA

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Formerly known as

Susan Shifrin DBA ARTZ Philadelphia

EIN

81-0862996

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Other Art, Culture, Humanities Organizations/Services N.E.C. (A99)

Alzheimer's (G83)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Dementia is the most pervasive illness in our country today: more dreaded than cancer, according to the data, and as stigmatized as cancer used to be. At a time when more than 50% of people living with Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias are going undiagnosed and one of every five Medicare dollars is spent on care for people with dementia, it is essential on a national and on a personal level that we come to terms with this epidemic in more effective ways. It is increasingly evident that the only reliable interventions available to us at this point are those that focus on enhancing quality of life -- providing joy and meaning through opportunities for creative self-expression, community-building and dignity preservation. We aim through our programs, projects and initiatives to dispel isolation and provide those opportunities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

ARTZ at the Museum

ARTZ Philadelphia staff facilitate group conversations about 3-4 works of art during each hour-long program at one of our partner museums. Groups are limited in size to 6-8 visitors plus their care partners to ensure an intimate and comfortable experience for everyone.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with diseases and illnesses

ARTZ Philadelphia staff facilitate arts-based group conversations among people living with dementia in residential care communities. Works of art, the memories they evoke, and anything else that comes up along the way are all fair game! As is laughter. Plenty of laughter. Conversations are sometimes paired with art-making and other creative experiences.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with diseases and illnesses

We launched this series of programs especially for the care partners of people living with dementia (usually family members caring for loved ones, though sometimes unrelated friends filling the same role). Our purpose in launching ARTZ Philadelphia Cafés for Care Partners was to provide engaging, stimulating experiences and respite from the daily grind.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Adults

The brainchild of ARTZ Philadelphia volunteer and project artist Jenn Warpole. Jenn works with ARTZ Philadelphia and with our partner residential care communities, hospitals, or senior care centers to develop a series of serendipitous opportunities for informal, creative self-expression. People living with memory loss and others who regularly visit these sites will encounter various prompts to stop and (literally) make their mark in sketchbooks, on community whiteboards, and in various other forms and media.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with diseases and illnesses

ARTZ Philadelphia staff facilitate hour-long programs focused on art-making in long-term residential care facilities, senior centers, and adult day care centers.. Groups are limited in size to 6-8 participants plus staff to ensure an intimate and comfortable experience for everyone.

Professionally facilitated,

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with diseases and illnesses

A first-of-its-kind mentoring program designed and facilitated by ARTZ Philadelphia staff in which people with dementia diagnoses and/or their caregivers mentor medical and other health professions students. Through this program, students learn about the all-important distinction between people and patients, what it means to live with chronic illness, and the vital need for empathy in effective healthcare.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Awards

Spirit of CARIE 2019

CARIE

Diplomat Award 2018

Dementia Society of America

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, Caregivers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers take into account participants in all programs, projects and initiatives.

Total number of guided tours given

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, Caregivers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Metrics relate to ARTZ @ The Museum, ARTZ on the Road, and ARTZ @ Jefferson programs.

Number of students who value social harmony

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

College and graduate/professional students engaged in our partnership programs with regional medical schools and universities.

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors

Related Program

ARTZ @ Jefferson/HeART Stories

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Mentors w/ dementia and mentors who are caregivers for people with dementia; for our programs ARTZ @ Jefferson and ARTZ-Connect @ PCOM in which healthcare students learn about living w dementia.

Number of people living with dementia who report improved quality of life with arts programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, Caregivers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Recurring participants in ARTZ Philadelphia programs who self-report, complete surveys, and/or provide verbal or written testimonials.

Number of first-time program participants.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, People with diseases and illnesses

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Across all programs, projects, initiatives. Numbers jumped in 2020 due to shift online as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, enabling us to reach a far broader geographic constituency.

Number of program participants living in long-term residential care communities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, People with diseases and illnesses

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Huge reduction in numbers in 2020 due to COVID-related constraints. We were unable to deliver our programs to long-term residential care communities starting in March 2020 and continuing through 2021.

Number of program participants living in their own or family homes.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, Caregivers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Events, presentations, ARTZ @ The Museum, ARTZ @ Jefferson/Heart Stories, ARTZ-Connect @ PCOM, ARTZ on the Road, ARTZ in the Making in adult day centers; ARTZ-Connect and other online programs.

Number of returning program participants.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Decline in 2020 due to COVID-related constraints, illnesses, deaths and cycling out of long-time program participants and their families.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our primary goal is to create safe, comfortable, and joyful spaces in which people living with dementia and their care partners can freely express themselves without fear of stigma; can discover themselves anew through creative and imaginative outlets; and can find contentment and reward in their daily lives. Secondary goals include bridging the societal gaps of understanding and respect between people living with dementia diagnoses and others in the wider community, in order that we help to create a Greater Philadelphia region that embraces community members living with dementia and their families. And finally, playing a key role in educating our current and future professional caregivers -- doctors, nurses, physical therapists, pharmacists, etc. -- about the experiences of living with dementia and other chronic neurological illnesses and ways in which they can rediscover their patients as people first, people with illnesses only a distant second.

Our strategies for realizing our goals are fundamentally rooted in community partnerships and collaborations. When we facilitate programs in arts and culture venues (such as museums and art centers, currently, and movie theaters and performance halls in the near future), we invite our host venues to embrace the programs and their participants as *their* programs and constituents so that our region begins to build an infrastructure of understanding and valuing those in the community living with dementia. When we facilitate programs in residential care communities and at care centers, we build ongoing relationships with our host venues as a means of ensuring structural integration of our programs and principles into their community life planning. And above all, we cultivate our relationships with our program participants on a personalized basis to ensure that everyone feels in tangible ways that they are valued and respected as individuals.

Our organization is unusually mission-driven. Our Board members not only understand and support our mission, they promote and strengthen it every day through their advocacy and action. Our executive director founded ARTZ Philadelphia and worked with the Board to define and refine our mission and strategic plan to ensure that we are thoughtful and focused in delivering what we promise. Our mission and vision statements were updated in 2020 to more explicitly reflect our existing commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion in all that we do.

Our organization -- from Board Chair to full-time staff to part-time contract program facilitators to volunteers -- is passionate about and dedicated to practicing as well as preaching.

Our challenges lie in funding and staffing our programs sufficiently to be able to meet the current community demand for them; and to expand as our region's needs inevitably expand with the startling increase in the incidence of dementia. But the framework is in place and is strong. Our new draft strategic plan, crafted during and in response to the sobering national events and experiences of 2020 and 2021, is both aspirational and exacting, with ambitious benchmarks that emphasize responsible growth.

In our first six years, we expanded from a single museum program and a single program inside a residential care community to four museum and art center programs each month and as many as twelve monthly programs inside care communities. We went from reaching an annual average of 100 people to being able to touch the lives of as many as 2000 people living with dementia and their families.

In 2018, we launched ARTZ in the Neighborhood, a grant-funded project dedicated to creating neighborhood-specific, culturally-sensitive and -responsive community-directed programs for people living with dementia and their care partners. Our first two neighborhood sites for the project have been the majority-Spanish-speaking neighborhood of Hunting Park and the majority Black neighborhoods of Northwest Philadelphia. Our project timeline has experienced a nearly two-year disruption due to the coronavirus pandemic. However, our hope is to have co-created with our community advisors sustainable programs facilitated by neighborhood residents and artists and administered with oversight by a community advisory group in each area by 2024. We intend to take the lessons learned to new neighborhoods; to expand over time the number and diversity of neighborhoods engaged through this process; and to define a new model of community- and stakeholder-directed best practices for developing programs for people living with dementia.

In 2020 and 2021, as a result of the global shutdowns cause by the coronavirus pandemic, our in-person programming profile shifted to exclusively online. When we return to in-person programming in 2022, we will be hybrid in our programs, projects and initiatives, sustaining online programming with a national reach even as we return to Philadelphia-based programs and initiatives driven by individual, neighborhood and community experiences.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People living with dementia and their care partners.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In the past twelve months, we have created two new programs for our constituents based on their feedback and needs. Our ARTZ in the Neighborhood projects are 100% rooted in and based on co-creation and co-design with the community members we are serving through the projects.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It infused our entire organization with a strategic commitment to community-directed program development and delivery.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

ARTZ PHILADELPHIA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ARTZ PHILADELPHIA

Board of directors
as of 7/16/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Lynn Harris

Commonwealth Consultants, Inc.

Term: 2020 - 2022

Carla Tate

Retired

Jerold Rothkoff

Rothkoff Elder Law

Cynthia Solis

Philadelphia Dept of Public Health

Nancy Chernett

Retired

Jonathan Stein

Comcast

Toya Algarin

JANE

Olga Jarrin

Rutgers University

Sheryl Watson

FLIK Hospitality Group

Marsha Perry

UPMC for Life

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/07/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/07/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.