Human Services

ARTZ PHILADELPHIA

Opening doors to people living with dementia: looking at art together, talking about art together, making art together ... creating memories together.

Philadelphia, PA

Mission

Our purpose is to provide opportunities for self-expression and for the rebuilding of self-esteem and dignity to people with memory loss and those who care for them. We achieve this mission through research-based programs that connect people living with dementia and their care partners with artists and cultural organizations in creative community.

ARTZ Philadelphia was founded on the belief that people living with dementia should be accorded the benefits of well-being and quality of life that others enjoy. We provide cultural and creative opportunities that turn that belief into reality. We are committed to supporting and celebrating people with dementia and their care partners as valued members of our wider creative community.

Ruling Year

2016

Founder and Executive Director

Susan Shifrin PhD

Main Address

1229 Chestnut St #188

Philadelphia, PA 19107 USA

Keywords

Alzheimers, dementia, memory loss, caregivers, arts and culture, empathy

EIN

81-0862996

 Number

5536404463

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Other Art, Culture, Humanities Organizations/Services N.E.C. (A99)

Alzheimer's (G83)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

ARTZ at the Museum

ARTZ on the Road

ARTZ Cafés for Care Partners

ART(Z) Stops

ARTZ in the Making

ARTZ @ Jefferson/HeART Stories

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Average number of service recipients per month

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults,

Aging, elderly, senior citizens,

People with diseases and illnesses

Context notes

Numbers take into account participants in all programs.

Total number of guided tours given

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults,

Aging, elderly, senior citizens,

People with diseases and illnesses

Context notes

Metrics relate to ARTZ @ The Museum, ARTZ @ Jefferson, and HeART Stories programs.

Number of students who value social harmony

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adolescents (13-19 years),

Adults

Context notes

College and graduate/professional students engaged in our partnership programs with regional medical schools and universities.

Number of mentors recruited

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults,

Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Related program

ARTZ @ Jefferson/HeART Stories

Context notes

Mentors w/ dementia and mentors who are caregivers for people with dementia; for our programs ARTZ @ Jefferson and HeART Stories, in which healthcare students learn about living w dementia.

Number of people living with dementia who report improved quality of life with arts programs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults,

Aging, elderly, senior citizens,

Caregivers

Context notes

Recurring participants in ARTZ Philadelphia programs who self-report, complete surveys, and/or provide verbal or written testimonials.

Number of first-time program participants.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults,

Aging, elderly, senior citizens,

People with diseases and illnesses

Number of program participants living in long-term residential care communities

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults,

Aging, elderly, senior citizens,

People with diseases and illnesses

Number of program participants living in their own or family homes.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults,

Aging, elderly, senior citizens,

People with diseases and illnesses

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

Our primary goal is to create safe, comfortable, and joyful spaces in which people living with dementia and their care partners can freely express themselves without fear of stigma; can discover themselves anew through creative and imaginative outlets; and can find contentment and reward in their daily lives. Secondary goals include bridging the societal gaps of understanding and respect between people living with dementia diagnoses and others in the wider community, in order that we help to create a Greater Philadelphia region that embraces community members living with dementia and their families. And finally, playing a key role in educating our current and future professional caregivers -- doctors, nurses, physical therapists, pharmacists, etc. -- about the experiences of living with dementia and other chronic neurological illnesses and ways in which they can rediscover their patients as people first, people with illnesses only a distant second.

Our strategies for realizing our goals are fundamentally rooted in community partnerships and collaborations. When we facilitate programs in arts and culture venues (such as museums and art centers, currently, and movie theaters and performance halls in the near future), we invite our host venues to embrace the programs and their participants as *their* programs and constituents so that our region begins to build an infrastructure of understanding and valuing those in the community living with dementia. When we facilitate programs in residential care communities and at care centers, we build ongoing relationships with our host venues as a means of ensuring structural integration of our programs and principles into their community life planning. And above all, we cultivate our relationships with our program participants on a personalized basis to ensure that everyone feels in tangible ways how valued and respected they are as individuals.

Our organization is unusually mission-driven. Our Board members not only understand and support our mission, they promote and strengthen it every day through their advocacy and action. Our executive director founded ARTZ Philadelphia and worked with the Board to define and refine our mission and strategic plan to ensure that we are thoughtful and focused in delivering what we promise. Our organization -- from Board Chair to part-time program coordinator -- is passionate about and dedicated to practicing as well as preaching.

Our challenges lie in funding and staffing our programs sufficiently to be able to meet the current community demand for them; and to expand as our region's needs inevitably expand with the startling increase in the incidence of dementia. But the framework is in place and is strong.

Indicators of our progress to date have included welcoming more and more constituents into our programs -- constituents who have come to us based on word-of-mouth recommendations from our existing program participants; based on referrals from care centers such as the Penn Memory Center at the University of Pennsylvania, with whom we collaborate; and based on media coverage. When new constituents come to us they stay with us, another indicator of progress -- they feel welcomed, they feel comfortable, they feel embraced.

Further indicators are the fact that we are approached every week by new residential care communities and new arts and culture venues about bringing our programs to their constituents. Our executive director is increasingly invited to speak about our work and to publish: another indicator that we are advancing our goal of reaching an ever-wider audience in our drive to expand the region's understanding of our constituents.

In the last two years, we have expanded from a single museum program and a single program inside a residential care community to six museum and art center programs each month and eight monthly programs inside care communities. We have gone from reaching an annual average of 100 people to being able to touch the lives of as many as 1000 people living with dementia and their families.

Our primary struggle is that of building capacity within our organization. Due to an exceedingly lean staff, we are not currently able to keep up with the community demand for our programs; and we are not yet able to reach as broad and diverse an audience as we need to.

External Reviews

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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No