Medical Research

Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer Foundation

"I don't want any other kid to have cancer" - Jonny Wade, 2007-2015

Santa Fe, NM   |  https://kidsshouldnthavecancer.org/

Mission

To conquer pediatric cancer through research and political action, with an emphasis on responsible spending. INITIATIVES: * Fund pediatric cancer research for treatments and cures * Improve access to and awareness of clinical trials for families facing pediatric cancer * Raise public awareness of the issues surrounding pediatric cancer funding * Influence the organizations that allocate federal cancer research funding

Ruling year info

2016

Founder/CEO

Kimberly Wade

Board Secretary

Jon Wade

Main address

PO Box 22505

Santa Fe, NM 87502 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

81-1221193

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Cancer Research (H30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Every year, over 300,000 children worldwide will be diagnosed with pediatric cancer and almost 100,000 of them will die. Pediatric cancer is the number 1 cause of death by disease in children. Even with these shocking statistics, pediatric cancer research is grossly underfunded and called "rare". The only way to change these statistics is for private foundations like the Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer Foundation to fund current pediatric cancer research and advocacy to make change.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Peptide Vaccine for Medulloblastoma Relapse Patients

This new peptide vaccine will be transmitted to pediatric patients that have relapsed medulloblastoma. Currently upon relapse, the child is terminal. However, this trial will give them an option and hopefully save their life.

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Budget
$75,000

1)More effective treatments are needed for pediatric high grade gliomas (HGG). Brain tumors in the pediatric population have a poor prognosis and account for the highest mortality rate of all childhood cancers(1). Of all the pediatric brain tumors, high-grade gliomas (HGG) remain the largest challenge, with few treatment options available and an overall five-year survival rate of just 10-30 percent(1-4). Pediatric HGG are a heterogeneous group of tumors that include the World Health Organization (WHO) grade III (anaplastic astrocytoma) and grade IV (glioblastoma) neoplasms. HGG are the second most common malignant CNS tumor of childhood. Current upfront therapies include surgical resection, radiation, therapy and chemotherapy(5). Despite aggressive multimodality therapy, the long-term survival is poor. The optimal salvage treatment approach for recurrent pediatric HGG after relapse has not been determined and very few prospective clinical trials are available for this population. We have seen little improvement in the ability to cure these children in the last 30 years. The lack of effective treatment of HGG in children clearly remains a largely unmet medical need, and highlights the need for novel and effective therapies. A potential alternative to conventional cancer treatments is to utilize a patient’s own immune system to target and eliminate tumor cells. Immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising treatment for a number of types of cancer, including melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer(6, 7). However similar results have not been seen in all tumor models and it has become clear that immune suppression within the tumor microenvironment is a significant barrier to successful cancer immunotherapy outcomes, particularly within bulky and recurrent solid tumors(8-10). 2) Specific Aims: Aim1: To evaluate the safety and potential clinical benefit of neoadjuvant checkpoint blockade (PD-1 mAb) in pediatric recurrent high grade glioma patients. We hypothesize that neoadjuvant checkpoint inhibition will be safe and will lead to extended survival. Aim 2: To identify the cellular immune mechanisms by which timing of distinct checkpoint inhibitors might enhance effective anti-tumor immune responses and potential clinical benefit in pediatric recurrent high grade glioma patients. We hypothesize that neoadjuvant checkpoint inhibition will activate systemic anti-tumor immune responses that are potentiated after surgical debulking, when the immune-inhibitory tumor microenvironment is reduced and will be evident by the increased TIL activation, increased IFN-γ production, and decreased cell cycle activity by the tumor.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Budget
$125,000

Where we work

Awards

Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer/St. Baldrick's Research Grant 2019

St Baldrick's Foundation

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

The Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer Foundation's mission is to conquer pediatric cancer through research and political action.

The Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer Foundation's strategy is to fund pediatric cancer research for treatments and cures, improve access to and awareness of clinical trials for families facing pediatric cancer, raising public awareness of the issues surrounding pediatric cancer funding and influencing the organizations that allocate federal cancer research funding.

The Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer Foundation consists of 11 board members from around the United States that all have impressive skills to forward our cause. The foundation hosts and is beneficiary to many fundraising events during the year that assist in our grantmaking process and raising public awareness. Furthermore, the foundation continues to work closely with legislators to urge additional pediatric cancer research funding in new legislation.

The Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer Foundation grants funds to pediatric cancer researchers after vetted through the foundation's Scientific Advisory Board. Each year, the foundation receives a progress report from all researchers that have been awarded funds. The foundation's Scientific Advisory Board reviews the research progress and advises the Board Members, as well as its donors.

Over the last 3 years, the Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer Foundation has awarded hundred of thousands dollars to researchers for specific programs that assist innovative pediatric cancer research in hopes of finding better treatments and ultimately a cure. The Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer Foundation will continue to raise funds for additional research, bring awareness to pediatric cancer and influence legislators to increase government funding.

Financials

Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Kids Shouldn't Have Cancer Foundation

Board of directors
as of 9/2/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Kimberly Wade


Board co-chair

Jon Wade

Jersey Community Hospital

Term: 2016 -

Beth Steckel

Jersey Community Hospital

Kimberly Wade

Jon Wade

Jersey Community Hospital

Susan Fallon

TMG Marketing

Phillip Lasseigne

Jill McMillan

Enlink

Jennifer Probst

Novartis

Pierre LaBarge IV

LaBarge Wineries

Dr. Todd Druley

Washington University

Dr. Stephen Skapek

UTSW - Dallas

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/02/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

Funding Pediatric Cancer Research, Pediatric Cancer Advocacy, Pediatric Cancer Awareness