Malala Fund

Founded by activist and Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai, we champion every girl’s right to 12 years of free, safe, quality education.

Washington, DC   |  https://www.malala.org/

Mission

Malala Fund is working for a world where every girl can learn and lead.

Ruling year info

2016

Co-founder and Board Chair

Malala Yousafzai

Co-founder and board member

Ziauddin Yousafzai

Main address

P.O. Box 73767

Washington, DC 20056 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-1397590

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (B12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Why are more than 130 million girls out of school? Threats to girls’ education — like poverty, war and gender discrimination — differ between countries and communities. — Child labour — Early marriage — Conflict — Cost — Gender bias — Health — Natural disasters — Poor quality We work in regions where the most girls miss out on secondary education — There are 3.7 million out-of-school children in Afghanistan — 60% are girls — Brazil is the world's eighth largest economy — but 1.5 million girls are still out of school — 47% of Ethiopian girls who start grade one do not make it to grade five — Only 40% of girls in India complete secondary education — Almost one out of three school-age children in Lebanon are Syrian refugees — Girls make up 60% of all out-of-school children in Nigeria at primary level — More than 22 million children in Pakistan are out of school — the majority of them are girls — As of 2019, 400,000 refugee children are out of school in Turkey

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Investing in local education activists

Inspired by Malala and Ziauddin Yousafzai’s roots as local activists in Pakistan, we established the Malala Fund Education Champion Network to identify, invest in and scale the work of promising local advocates and educators.

Over the course of a three-year grant, Education Champions implement ambitious and targeted projects and participate in advocacy campaigns to change local and national policies that hinder girls’ education access.

Malala Fund supports Education Champions in Afghanistan, Brazil, Ethiopia, India, Lebanon, Nigeria, Pakistan and Turkey.

To learn more about Malala Fund's Education Champion Network, please visit: malala.org/champions

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

We’re working for 12 years of free, safe, quality education for every girl. We advocate — at local, national and international levels — for resources and policy changes needed to give all girls a secondary education.

We meet with heads of state and high-level officials — people with the power to shift critical resources towards education — and ask them to increase their investment in girls’ futures.

We believe girls should speak for themselves — that’s why we bring young education activists to high-level conferences to tell leaders what they need to learn and achieve their potential. We created Assembly, a digital publication and newsletter, as a platform for girls' voices.

Our Education Champions spearhead campaigns to promote girls’ education in their communities, countries and regions.

To learn more, please visit: malala.org/advocacy.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

We believe girls should speak for themselves — that’s why we bring young education activists to high-level conferences to tell leaders what they need to learn and achieve their potential. We created Assembly, a digital publication and newsletter, as a platform for girls' voices.

Malala began blogging about girls’ education at age 11. Today, she helps other girls tell their stories with Malala Fund. Through Assembly, Malala Fund is helping girls and young women around the world to share their thoughts, challenges and accomplishments — and for all of us to learn about this new generation of leaders.

To learn more, please visit: assembly.malala.org

Population(s) Served

Our team conducts pivotal research on the impact of girls’ secondary education on our world to influence policy and funding decisions.

To explore our research on why girls’ education is the world’s best investment, please visit: malala.org/research

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls
Children and youth
Women and girls

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of local educators and activists in our Education Champion Network

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Women and girls

Related Program

Investing in local education activists

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Cumulative total number of local educators and activists supported by Malala Fund who spearhead campaigns to promote girls’ education in their communities, countries and regions.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Malala Fund is working for a world where every girl can learn and lead. With more than 130 million girls out of school today, we are breaking down the barriers that hold them back.

We are realistic about the work ahead. We know there are no straight lines or overnight solutions to getting all girls in school and learning.

By 2025, we want to see a substantial increase in well-educated girls in the countries where we work, improved and better-financed education systems and communities that offer girls equal opportunities to learn and actively support their ambitions.

Thematic Goals:

1. Challenge social norms that limit girls’ potential
2. Increase investment in girls’ education
3. Improve education quality

Operational Goals:

1. Develop a global network of education advocates
2. Deliver tangible change in targeted geographies
3. Amplify girls’ voices and their advocacy efforts

For more information about Malala Fund's goals and the details of our approach, read our strategic plan.

Through our Education Champion Network, we invest in local educators and advocates — the people who best understand girls in their communities — in regions where the most girls are missing out on secondary school.

We advocate — at local, national and international levels — for resources and policy changes needed to give all girls a secondary education. The girls we serve have high goals for themselves — and we have high expectations for leaders who can help them.

We believe girls should speak for themselves and tell leaders what they need to learn and achieve their potential. We amplify girls’ voices and share their stories through Assembly, our digital publication and newsletter.

Our Education Champion Network supports the work of education activists in Afghanistan, Brazil, Ethiopia, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, Turkey and Lebanon. These local leaders understand the challenges girls face in their communities and are best placed to identify, innovate and advocate for policy and programmatic solutions.

In Afghanistan: recruiting female teachers and eliminating gender discrimination to increase the number of girls enroled in school.

In Brazil: ensuring schools reach the most marginalised girls, educating teachers on gender discrimination and training young women to speak out for their rights.

In Ethiopia: making schools safer and more accommodating for girls, mobilising governments and communities to address barriers to education and improving girls’ access to education through advocacy.

In India: expanding access to free secondary school through advocacy, mentorship programmes and re-enrolment campaigns.

In Nigeria: helping girls who live under the threat of Boko Haram go to school and campaigning for new policies that support education for every girl.

In Pakistan: fighting for education funding, building schools for girls and training young women to advocate.

In Afghanistan, grantee Watch on Basic Rights Afghanistan Organization (WBRAO) worked with the Ministry of Hajj and Religious Affairs to develop sermons and promotional materials that support girls' education and rights. The ministry disseminated the speeches and printed material to nearly 5,000 mosques across Afghanistan to improve social perceptions of girls' education.

In the Quilombola territories of Brazil, grantee Centro de Cultural Luiz Freire (CCLF) worked with the municipality of education to help repair school transportation vehicles and increase their circulation through the Quilombola territories to bring more girls to school.

In India's state of Bihar, grantee Azad India Foundation enrolled 1,200 out-of-school girls in remedial education classes. The grantee organization used Malala Fund's girl advocate guide to teach girls public-speaking and how to advocate for their right to learn.

In Lebanon, three Malala Fund grantees joined forces to develop a remedial education programme that prepares Syrian refugee girls to pass the brevet exam, a required test to enter upper secondary school in Lebanon.

In Nigeria, grantee Centre for Girls' Education (CGE) provided 418 out-of-school girls with classes in literacy, numeracy and life skills, which helped 86% of them enroll in full-time public school. As a result of their success, the organization is now working to help replicate the model at a girls' centre in Niger.

In Pakistan, as a result of grantee Blue Veins' advocacy work, the provincial government in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa significantly increased funding levels for girls' education - the single largest allocation for girls' education in the province's history, which will go towards reconstruction, establishment and rehabilitation of girls' schools in the area.

In Turkey, grantee Mavi Kalem worked with 85 teachers to implement standards in classrooms to improve over 11,000 Syrian refugee students' continuity in education.

Financials

Malala Fund
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Malala Fund

Board of directors
as of 07/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Malala Yousafzai

Alaa Murabit

Fayeeza Naqvi

Lynn Taliento

Malala Yousafzai

Ziauddin Yousafzai

Françoise Moudouthe

Susan McCaw

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data