PLATINUM2023

Rwanda-one4one

Empowering Rwandan families.

Westmoreland, NH   |  www.rwandaone4one.org

Mission

We work with Rwandan families helping them create a path to a better life through income opportunities and education.

Notes from the nonprofit

Rwanda-one4one does not have paid staff/ paid CEO. We are a volunteer organization.

Ruling year info

2016

Founder and Executive Director

Nancy W Zeller

Main address

116 Paine Rd

Westmoreland, NH 03467 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-2156943

NTEE code info

Single Organization Support (S11)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Rwandan genocide survivor Mariya, 69, heads a household of 30, including 18 children, all struggling with the effects of poverty. Employment opportunities for Rwandan women over 35 are severely limited. Rwanda-one4one was formed to help Mariya care for her impoverished family by teaching her and her daughter Victoire to naturally dye textiles, providing a sustainable source of income, and to provide education for her young grandchildren. Nearly one million Rwandans were brutally slaughtered in the 1994 genocide. Most of the survivors were widows and children like Mariya and her family. Female heads of household in Rwanda can barely cultivate enough food for their families along with providing child care and fulfilling other household duties. There is no free public education in Rwanda and families like Mariya's cannot afford the $300 per year for primary and secondary school. The brutal cycle of poverty continues.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Umva Project

Rwanda-one4one is working with families in Rwanda, bringing empowerment through entrepreneurship opportunities and education aid to the children.

Due to male losses from the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi, the elder women have few ways to earn income and poverty is the way of life for many.
Through Rwanda-one4one, the Umva project began in 2015. Umva (pronounced oom-va) taps into the creativity of a small group of women open to learning a handcraft and eager to earn a living. The women have become skilled in the art of naturally dyeing textiles, and they use their knowledge of the indigenous plants they gather from the hillsides. The exquisite colors and patterns on cloth that they dye by hand become ‘art to wear’ in the form of gorgeous one-of-a-kind scarves and wraps.
Umva textiles are being purchased around the world and are recognized for their beauty. Through the sale of each fair-trade item an income – and some economic stability -- returns to the women.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

In Rwanda, and elsewhere in the world, education remains the most effective way to lift a community from poverty.

There is no public, free education in Rwanda. Rwanda-one4one’s work, supported by donations, means that families who could otherwise not afford to regularly send their children to school can do so. Our aim is to cover the cost of tuition to send a child to grade school or high school for a year.

Having an education in Rwanda is an important step toward opportunity. The young people who we help send to school might learn a trade or go to college. No matter what path they choose, being educated ultimately offers exposure to new ideas, a chance for employment, and providing income and a better life for themselves and their families.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Sending Children to School

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In addition to covering tuition for our participating children, we also pay for their books and uniforms. All students are passing since joining the program in 2015.

Number of low-income families housed in affordable, well-maintained units as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We have helped two families make significant improvements to their homes including structural repairs and a rain water collection system. We are now helping a third family build their first home.

Additional revenue and wages generated attributable to the organization's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Umva Project

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our dyers earn three times the national average wage for uneducated workers in Rwanda. We added three dyers in 2022.

Number of health outcomes improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We had two medical interventions in 2022 including a uterine tumor removal and a dental issue.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Sustainable peace in Rwanda can only be achieved by rebuilding its social and familial structure along with its economic and physical infrastructure. Women like Mariya and Victoire play a critical role in this process. Investment in women and children helps break the crushing cycle of poverty, improving the lives of families and strengthening the social fabric of the community. The commitment of Rwanda-one4one is to help transition families from joblessness and poverty to meaningful work that provides fair wages. Creating entrepreneurial opportunities has a positive impact on the individuals, the local economy and thus the wider community.

We provide Rwandan women an income-earning craft of naturally dyeing fabric to make beautiful wraps and scarves and we fund education for their children. Income in the hands of women, coupled with education for children, is the most effective means of lifting families and communities from poverty. The World Bank estimates that 90% of women's earnings are invested in their families. Education increases a child's chance of living a healthy life, increases income opportunities and promotes peace. Rwanda-one4one strives to open up entrepreneurial opportunities to all members of the families we work with, coupled with providing education for the children in the families.

Our founder, Nancy Zeller, is a textile artist with expertise in natural dyes and dyeing and a passion for Rwanda and its victimized population. After a visit to Rwanda in 2014 when she met Mariya and her family, Nancy was so moved by their plight that she vowed to help make a difference in their lives. She taught Mariya and her daughter Victoire to make dyes from native Rwandan plants and to use those dyes to make beautiful silk and wool wraps and scarves to sell through Nancy's connections. With this new skill they are able to earn real income on a sustainable basis. We also help fund primary and secondary education for her school age grandchildren.

Since then Nancy has established Rwanda-one4one as a 501(c)(3) organization and recruited a volunteer board to help advise her efforts. Our mission is to work with Rwandan families, helping them create a path to a better life through income opportunities and education, offering not a handout, but a hand up.

Since our inception, Rwanda-one4one has listened to the community we work with, and in that way we can give the energy and resources needed. We don't decide what is best for the families, but rather we support what makes the best sense given their culture and abilities.
In 2014, we began by assisting 4 Rwandan children, grades K-12 with school fees. In 2019, we are assisting 16 children with annual school fees, uniforms and books.

Umva, the natural dye project, started in 2015, and provides work for local women, who we’ve trained to gather indigenous plants from the Rwandan hillsides for naturally dyeing textiles. Umva dyers take immense pride in the craft of natural dyeing and applying it to cloth by hand. Umva is a blossoming opportunity for the families for which they are nurturing its success. The finished pieces (gorgeous scarves and wraps) are one-of-a-kind and speak to the determination of the women to earn an income, so they can feed and care for their families.

In 2017, we implemented the taxi project to provide employment for one family and to fill the need for a car-for-hire by locals and tourists. It is running successfully, the business owner is learning how to earn income and also save income for necessary business expenses.

We want to continue to reach a greater sales market for the Umva products, both to retail and wholesale markets. We strive to continue to pay school fees for the children in our families, increasing the expense as we can, and to continue to listen, act and learn with our Rwandan families.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Rwanda-one4one
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Rwanda-one4one

Board of directors
as of 11/07/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jennie Norman

Emma Pantesco

Jennie Norman

Nancy Zeller

Katherine Richardson

Keely Fillo

Jennifer Paone

Olivia Dunnigan

Grace Munezero

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/30/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data