GOLD2023

Be Seattle Organizing

Small gestures make big impacts.

aka Be:Seattle   |   Seattle, WA   |  http://beseattle.org

Mission

The mission of Be:Seattle is to build the power and leadership of renters and people experiencing homelessness to fight displacement and increase access to housing in Seattle that is healthy, safe and affordable for all. Through renter education and organizing, street outreach and mutual aid, and advocating for policies that prioritize housing safety, equity, and stability, Be:Seattle works to make Seattle more livable for those most impacted by housing injustice.

Ruling year info

2016

Co-Executive Director/Organizing

Kate Rubin

Co-Director (Operations)

Tanya Moore

Main address

1919 E Prospect Street #302

Seattle, WA 98112 USA

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EIN

81-2172232

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (L01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Pledge

The Pledge is easy & innovative
Offer something. Help someone.

The Pledge is a partnership with 44 Puget Sound businesses, offers 17 services to unhoused neighbors across Seattle

The Pledge is simple: Help others by offering what you can – a free coffee/water, a phone call, a snack, etc. Even the smallest gesture can help make a person’s day better.

Businesses communicate what they can offer via easy-to-interpret stickers put up on their door or window. It’s that easy, and this small gesture goes a long way toward helping a lot of people.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Building Tenant Power Workshops evolved from our Tenant Rights Bootcamps. Like our bootcamps, each workshop continues to provide tenants with an overview of their rights and available resources. However, we recognized that building a resilient tenant community sat at the intersection of many struggles and required us to dig deeper into the issues facing renters. Our Building Tenant Power workshops address a different topic each month and are designed to build upon each other over time.

Each workshop features a panel of experts, a discussion of relevant community resources and breakout rooms for participants to share their own lived experiences and knowledge. In 2021, workshop topics included the eviction moratorium, disability and housing justice, LGBTQIA+ housing issues, student housing, legislative advocacy, and eviction defense.

For many renters, these workshops are their first connection to Be:Seattle, the knowledge of their rights as renters, and the confidence to advocate for

Population(s) Served

The Tenant Leadership Council is a project that began in 2021. The advice and support shared among tenants in small group breakout sessions can be the most impactful component of our workshops. The tenant leadership council builds on this energy. The goal is to establish a body of tenant organizers from buildings around Seattle with Be:Seattle acting as a landing space for those organizers to share community knowledge, tenant organizing best practices and campaign coordination. This creates a space for deeper grassroots organizing and requires community trust and strong relationships. We spent this past year building those connections and developing tenant leaders within their individual renter communities. We currently partner with the Tenants Union of Washington and plan to launch the Tenant Leadership Council and Resource Hub this winter/first quarter of 2022.

The goal is to equip the Tenant Leadership Council with the tools and community resources to lead the organizing movement

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Be Seattle Organizing
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Be Seattle Organizing

Board of directors
as of 08/02/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cecelia Black

Pierre Funalot

Eloise Lombard

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/2/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/02/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.