Every Third Saturday Inc.

Fostering hope and supporting Post Traumatic Growth

Minneapolis, MN   |  www.everythirdsaturday.com

Mission

To support veterans and their families by fostering hope and promoting Post Traumatic Growth.

Ruling year info

2016

Director

Tom Mckenna

Main address

4303 East 54th Street

Minneapolis, MN 55417 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-2658331

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Every Third Saturday (ETS) is working to address the issues facing veterans who are in periods of transition. Examples of these transitions would be vets who are recently housed after a period of homelessness, veterans who are being released from incarceration, those that have recently completed a VA program to treat mental health and/or substance abuse issues, and those vets who have recently been discharged from the military.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Warrior's Path

The Warrior's Path is a mechanism for veterans and their families to design and follow a path towards a better future.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel

Where we work

Accreditations

Peer Support Specialist - Minnesota Certification Board 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of veterans with PTSD served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Warrior's Path

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 numbers are significantly decreased due to COVID.

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Veterans

Related Program

Warrior's Path

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of homeless participants engaged in mental health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Homeless people, Veterans

Related Program

Warrior's Path

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Veterans

Related Program

Warrior's Path

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At ETS we are aiming to accomplish the restoration of hope to veterans and their families. Veterans, spouses, children, parents, and others who love a veteran are surely familiar with the "invisible injuries" affecting those who have served.

The VA is doing all it can to address the issues of PTSD, depression, anxiety, and moral injury, but it can't possibly do it alone. Medical doctors can address the physical wounds caused by service, and psychiatrists can address the mental ones, but there is currently no answer to the emotional and spiritual anguish experienced by veterans and their families. It is these unaddressed emotional and spiritual issues which cause the unacceptable rates of suicide, homelessness, legal trouble and family problems.

ETS aims to meet veterans where they are, and walk alongside them as they and their family design and pursue a better future.

Since 2007, we have addressed the physical and emotional needs of homeless veterans in the Twin Cities. As our efforts have grown, we have expanded, and in 2016 formally incorporated as a 501 (c) 3. Incorporating and being designated as tax exempt, has opened up new and exciting opportunities to serve veterans and their families.

In 2017, we opened an office 2 blocks down from the Minneapolis VA Medical Center. The office has allowed us to have a full time, visible presence to the veterans community. Inside, we have built the Supply Room, which is set up like a store so veterans in need can shop for the items they need in a way that infuses dignity in to the process and creates a sense of pride for the veteran that they are welcome as a fellow brother or sister in arms, and not simply as a "service recipient" or a "charity case".

The second strategy is the creation of our Pop Smoke technology platform which reaches the newest generation of veterans and their families in a digital way. The platform facilitates access to the many organizations in our partner network and ensures that veteran receive a prompt response to their inquiries. Providing a digital method of seeking resources is vital to ensuring vets who may be isolating can feel comfortable requesting support.

Finally, ETS began a 12 week course called The Warrior's Path designed to support veterans as they move from the effects of trauma to Post Traumatic Growth. The course entails bringing in 30 subject matter experts in areas such as relationship management, financial management, service to others, and physical and mental health. Veterans have the opportunity to stay in a comfortable 6 bedroom house while they are attending the course andd they attend full days of classes 4 days a week.

The staggering rates of suicide, homelessness, self medication, and legal and relational difficulties are caused by the loss of hope and purpose experienced by vets and their families. Getting them out of their homes, connecting with each other, and discovering new purpose for their lives, will cause profound and positive change in the lives of veterans and
their families.

Given the fact that we are up and running in our office space and our coffee shop, we are primed and ready to serve veterans and their families as they design and pursue a better future.

Besides simple physical space, we have several professionals who have committed to donating their services to facilitate positive change for those we serve; from licensed psychologists, certified peer support specialists, life coaches, and mentors, our capability to provide tremendous opportunity to vets and their families is in place.

No matter where a veteran is in their journey, we are ready to come alongside them and support them in any and every possible way. Each veteran's story is unique, therefore each of their futures will be just as unique.

ETS will ensure, to the best of our ability, each vet and their family are provided the opportunity they need to achieve the future they desire.

Since 2007, we have distributed over 75,000 items to veterans in the Twin Cities, including more than 12,000 quilts. We continue to hold our Every Third Saturday events where veterans in need can come and find clothing, hygiene items, socks, underwear, sleeping bags, boots, suits, and other items. Our distribution of needed items is how we started and will always be a part of how we serve veterans and their families.

Over the last 10 years, we have served hundreds of veterans who are in need of physical assistance. As we begin a new chapter in our evolution, we have begun to serve the emotional and spiritual needs of vets and their families. Already, several vets have come through our doors to begin their journey towards a better future. Peer led support groups are forming now and will begin this fall, and activities such as motorcycle rides, a veteran's chess club, and an ETS sponsored rec basketball team are currently being created,

In addition, ETS has formed partnerships with many entities who can provide vital resources and support to veterans and their families. Organizations such as the Salvation Army, MACV, the Minneapolis VA Medical Center, the VA Community Resource and Referral Center, the Hands Foundation, VFW and American Legion Posts, the Department of Minnesota DAV, the Veterans Resiliency Project, and many more. We will continue to initiate and cultivate these types of relationships with whomever is willing and able to support and assist veterans and their families.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    ETS serves veterans and their families. The veteran community comprises individuals from every demographic, race, sexual orientation, and faith background.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    It was recently brought to our attention that female veterans did not feel as welcome as their male counterparts. In response, we set up a women's only section in our free store and strive to ensure women veterans are supported by female volunteers and are not forced to interact with males in which that make them uncomfortable.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Soliciting feedback for the people we serve empowers them and builds trust. The trust that is built when individuals feel listened to allows us to support them more efficiently and effectively.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Every Third Saturday Inc.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Every Third Saturday Inc.

Board of directors
as of 6/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Scott Marrier

Hands Foundation

Term: 2019 - 2021

Darrell Marrier

Trophy Trailer

Adam Mikkelson

Tradition Companies

Tom Shaver

Inland Development

Tip Enebak

Enebak Construction

Jessi Mckenna

ETS

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Disabled Veteran
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/17/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.