Mental Health, Crisis Intervention

Rattle the Stars

Preventing Suicide. Promoting Living.

Champaign, IL

Mission

Our mission is to prevent suicide.

Ruling Year

2016

Executive Director

Kim Bryan

Main Address

4002 Tallgrass Dr

Champaign, IL 61822-2033 USA

Keywords

education, advocacy

EIN

81-3198241

 Number

5938006605

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

Personal Social Services (P50)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Nationally, 1 in 6 youth and 1 in 25 adults have thoughts of suicide, and over 48,000 Americans die of suicide each year. In Illinois, nearly 1500 people die of suicide each year, including nearly 100 youth. Suicide is not caused by mental illness, but is instead the result of complex biological, psychological, and social factors. Suicide is a social issue, yet prevention efforts focus on individual mental health treatment rather than community-based interventions that mitigate risk factors, build protective factors, and create networks of support. Suicide is treated as an individual defect, rather than a response to stress, crisis, and trauma, and as such, suicidal people are discriminated against and oppressed in treatment and intervention programs that are not designed to meet their needs.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

RTS/C Responding to Suicide with Compassion

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of students receiving information on suicide

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

K-12 (5-19 years)

Related program

RTS/C Responding to Suicide with Compassion

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

In 2019 we began piloting our training program to a limited number of youth.

Number of adults receiving information on suicide

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults

Related program

RTS/C Responding to Suicide with Compassion

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

In 2019 we began piloting our training program to a limited number of adults.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

We are working to prevent suicide. Our goal is not just to prevent suicide deaths, but also prevent suicidal thoughts and behaviors by promoting life. We work to reduce risk factors, build protective factors, and to create community-wide support networks to provide services and supports that meet the needs of suicidal people and their supportive persons.

We center the voices and needs of people who have experienced suicide in all of work. In our suicide prevention consultation service, we work within institutions to promote cultural change to create norms and social spaces built on understanding, safety, and support. Rather than telling suicidal people to ask for help, we work to eliminate discrimination so that they feel safe doing so. Understanding that people exist in many spaces, we offer this service to schools, businesses, and community groups and agencies. Our youth and adult training programs advocate for treating suicidal people with respect and dignity and shifting from risk-averse responses to compassionate, culturally sensitive, non-judgmental, strengths-based, trauma-informed responses. We also understand that people experiencing suicide need ongoing support from their social networks. Rather than teaching people to simply refer suicidal people to mental health services, we teach skills that people can continue to use to be a supportive person. Understanding that suicide is a community issue, we expand suicide prevention beyond mental health services to include a variety of other formal and informal support networks, including schools, businesses, and other community organizations. We collaborate with and support other organizations that interact with people at-risk for suicide, such as those that serve veterans, the LGBTQ+ community, the elderly, youth (including bullying prevention), survivors of sexual assault and abuse, survivors of domestic violence, and people impacted by community violence.

Currently, we have the capability to provide training to approximately 5,000 people per year, and to provide consultation to approximately 20 organizations per year. We also host two large community events each year and participate in at least 10 other events to share information and resources. With funding for additional staff, we will expand our capability to bring suicide prevention services to the community.

The ideal indicator of progress is a reduction in the suicide rate and reports of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, but this is nearly impossible to reliably measure in a small population. Also, we would ideally like to have evaluations from people experiencing suicide, but we don't necessarily provide service directly to them and so don't have access to request feedback from them. Instead, we have to rely on reporting from those that we train to provide suicide prevention services. We routinely evaluate our services with surveys of participants that include follow-up questions about how and how often they have used the skills. Understanding that suicide is an issue that many people feel uncomfortable addressing, we look for increases in not just knowledge and perceptions of skills, but also increases in how comfortable people feel using the skills. Additionally, we rely on self-reports from organizations on their experiences implementing and using suicide response plans. When available, we do look at indirect data on numbers of people accessing support services.

We have developed training programs for a variety of audiences, we have provided training to hundreds of people, and we have assisted several organizations in completing suicide response plans. We will continue to expand our programs and reach more people in the community. We are also building capacity to offer postvention support using a therapy dog and to begin offering direct support services to people affected by suicide.

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, suggestion box/email.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.
What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?
It is difficult to: we don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback.

External Reviews

Financials

Rattle the Stars

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

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SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Not Applicable

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Not Applicable

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Not Applicable

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable