PLATINUM2023

FARM STEW INTERNATIONAL

A recipe for abundant life!

aka FARM STEW   |   Princeton, IL   |  www.farmstew.org

Mission

FARM STEW’s mission is to improve the health and well- being of poor families and vulnerable people by sharing the recipe for abundant life throughout the world.

Ruling year info

2016

President and Founder

Mrs. Joy Kauffman, MPH

President of FARM STEW Uganda

Mr. Edward Kaweesa

Main address

PO Box 291

Princeton, IL 61356 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-3366582

NTEE code info

Nutrition Programs (K40)

Agricultural Programs (K20)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the UN the world's hungry rose to 828 million people (as of July 2022): • 98% of them live in the developing world, • 75% of them live in rural areas, “mainly in the villages of Asia and Africa," and • 70% of them rely on farming as their primary occupation. The life expectancy in rural sub-Saharan Africa is 63.82 years. Therefore it is safe to say that globally, the most vulnerable families are in rural villages and they are struggling to survive. In sub-Saharan Africa, about 24.1% of the total population are undernourished, according to a multi-agency UN report for 2021. A staggering 13,800 children under the age of 5 died every day in 2021 alone, and 45% of those were linked to malnutrition. Nutrition during the first 1,000 days of life (conception to two years) is the most impactful for life long health. It is clear that the world’s most vulnerable children are in homes in African/Asian rural villages and their families are farming to survive.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

FARM STEW Africa

FARM STEW International trains local Africans to educate their communities through gardening, healthful cooking, obtaining clean water, improving sanitation, and inspiring enterprise. They conduct hands-on classes, freely sharing practical skills so that, without creating dependency, people can help themselves. Over 265,000 participants in Uganda, South Sudan, Sudan, Zambia and Zimbabwe have benefited in the last four years. Learn more at www.farmstew.org

Population(s) Served
Farmers
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of health education trainings conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Women and girls, People of African descent

Related Program

FARM STEW Africa

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FARM STEW classes covers the basics of nutrition, sanitation and preventive health measures. It includes a hands-on cooking class using locally available ingredients to create protein rich foods.

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People of African descent, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

FARM STEW Africa

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are participants in FARM STEW's hands-on practical cooking, agriculture, sanitation classes that equip them with skills to help them thrive.

Number of health/hygiene product and/or tools of care (mosquito nets, soap, etc.) administered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Women and girls

Related Program

FARM STEW Africa

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FARM STEW provides girls with reusable cloth pads and panties for along with menstrual health and hygiene education. We can provide Freedom from Shame for $15 per girl.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

FARM STEW is a recipe for an abundant life. Our mission is to improve the health and well-being of poor families and vulnerable people throughout the world. It's designed to root out the causes of hunger disease and poverty.

These are FARM STEW's five goals, related to the UN's Sustainable Development Goals:
1. Battle Stunting
"Decrease stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age", and increase dietary diversity in order to "address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons" per the UN's Sustainable Development Goal #2.2

2. Establish Home Gardens
Establish kitchen gardens and conservation agriculture by training and equipping subsistence farm families seeking to "end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular, the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants to safe, nutritious and sufficient food year," per the UN's Sustainable Development Goal#2.1

3. Increase Food Availability
Increase simple, domestic processing locally available and affordable plant-based foods to maximize nutrient value, particularly soybeans, maize, fruits, and vegetables; per the e UN's Sustainable Development Goal#2.4

4. Develop Small Business
Develop entrepreneurial skills for Income Generating Activities (IGA) with agricultural products, per the UN's Sustainable Development Goal #8.

5. Improve Sanitation
"Achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations" per the UN's Sustainable Development Goal#6

Our ultimate goal is family and community transformation that would lead to an abundant life, free from disease, hunger and poverty!

Through African Christian leaders, we educate rural, African families how to live an abundant life. FARM STEW teams of indigenous workers meet these families where they are, encouraging and equipping them to make choices that contribute to their health and well-being.

FARM STEW's eight “ingredients", that we train in include:
• Farming: Faithfulness to principles revealed in God's word and observed in nature
• Attitude: Choice to live God's way, to be disciplined and to have a positive outlook
• Rest: Nightly and weekly for our bodies and also not disturbing the soil and covering it
• Meals: Plant-based, whole foods diet using mostly what the family can grow themselves

• Sanitation: In our bodies, with a focus on women, with our food and around our homes
• Temperance: Moderation in good things, abstaining from things that are harmful
• Enterprise: Promoting opportunities, addressing gender bias, to pursue sustainability
• Water: Fresh, in abundance, detoxifying, for grains and legumes, as well as for our bodies

FARM STEW vision is to mobilize a global workforce, in small, highly efficient teams that are master trainers, serving to equip communities and faith-based groups to carry out the work independently. We train trainers who multiply the reach of the message. So far we've partnered with schools, mosques, churches, prisons, HIV/AIDs groups and many organizations to carry the message to their members and beyond.

Founded by Joy Kauffman, MPH, a Johns Hopkins trained public health nutritionist with a 30-year commitment to holistic health for the poor, FARM STEW combines decades of experience in international development, nutrition and health. In Uganda, our team of 7 talented local, Christian staff includes a nutritionist, agronomist, IT/communications and certified trainers.
We are a growing organization that has come a long way in a short time. Here are five capabilities we've acquired.
1. Talent:
We are good at attracting, motivating, and retaining competent and committed people. We invest in training them and giving expanding opportunities for leadership. We are good at ensuring that team members and program participants have positive and consistent experiences with FARM STEW.
2. Speed:
We are good at reaching the community and making important changes rapidly. For example, when a severe drought added to the hunger of local people, we found that jackfruit and moringa from two tropical trees remained in abundance. Our classes then incorporated these highly nutritious products into the curriculum
3. Accountability and Efficiency:
We are good at assuring integrity and stewardship of our resources. Our volunteer bookkeeper is a Mennonite Farmer who works for H&R Block as a tax preparer during tax season. We are good at managing costs, working with the local staffs and maximizing their impact.
4. Collaboration:
We are good at working with others to ensure both efficiency and leverage. For example, we have received thousands of dollars worth of AFRIPads, reusable cloth pads made in Uganda because of the work that we've done to share them with rural village girls.
5. Learning:
We are good at listening to local people and generating and generalizing ideas with impact. For example, after learning that girls were dropping out of school because of shame related to menstruation, we found a local company that produces reusable cloth pads and raised funds to provide them to girls.

Tens of thousands of people have attended full-day training held in villages, schools, mosques, orphanages, churches, and prisons. Testimonies of improved health and livelihood abound. In just three and a half years, we’ve accomplished the following:
• Developed 20 Certified FARM STEW Trainers with skills in nutrition, agriculture and child survival,
• Sold at subsidized prices over 3,000 Kg of improved variety, Non-GMO soybeans to farmers to improve yields,
• Distributed thousands of vegetable seedlings for vegetable gardens,
• Provided 2,100 girls with reusable cloth menstrual pads, made in Africa, and,
• Supplied more than 500 training packs that include instruction guide and low-literacy visual aids that equip the community leaders.

Finally, we see the need for a health food industry that could produce the soy-based proteins, legumes and multigrain foods that would enhance the nutrition of the general population as well as help to finance the local workers for FARM STEW. We've established a company in Uganda called FARM STEW Ltd. that would serve as the legal entity for the work, allocating profits to the organization. We need to start up capital for the industry, but we believe that in the long term, this model is sustainable and will provide multiple benefits to all involved.

Would you consider being part of mobilizing African health and agricultural workers for this cause? We need support to grow and expand this model.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

FARM STEW INTERNATIONAL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FARM STEW INTERNATIONAL

Board of directors
as of 09/10/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Susan Cherne J. D.

FARM STEW International

Term: 2023 - 2022

Dawna Sawatzky

Cherri Olin

Kevin Sadler

Juliette Bannister

Edwin Dysinger, MPH

Joy Kauffman, MPH

Dr Sherry Shrestha

Dr Etienne Musonera ..

Rick Westermeyer

Etienne Musonera

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/10/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/11/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.