Sunnyside Farms Inc

Sunnyside Farms, Where Traditional Norwegian Bloodlines Meet Today's Therapeutic Needs

Clyde Park, MT   |  https://sunnysidefjords.org

Mission

Our mission is to provide life-changing educational and therapeutic opportunities in association with the farm, it’s inhabitants and down-n-dirty work experience.

Ruling year info

2016

Executive Director

Wend Bauwens

Main address

PO Box 265

Clyde Park, MT 59018 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-3473963

NTEE code info

Nonmonetary Support N.E.C. (E19)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the CDC WONDER Online Database, Montana ranks #1 in US overall suicide rate & #4 for youth. Closer to home, Park County ranks #28 in US out of 2,727 counties. Overall suicide rates increased by 26% in MT & 36% in Park Co. in 10 years. Young men in Montana are more likely than females to die by suicide; however, females’ rates are also growing. Some of MT’s highest suicide rates, relative to other states, are for the youngest citizens (10- to 14-year-olds). It is obvious that we have a problem and our youth are struggling. At Sunnyside Farms, we have the people, the environment and animals to foster long-term systemic changes in the lives of the kids in our community. By providing empowerment opportunities that offer long term help for these kids in a safe and enriching environment, they can thrive and find hope in the future.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Camp Sunnyside

Camp Sunnyside promotes social skills, communication, confidence, kindness, balance, safety and purpose in the lives of children through creativity, imagination and experiences with yoga, art and the animals at the farm. Preschool, elementary and middle school youth can attend camp as our objective is to empower the older students and help them to realize their own leadership skills, while they help to develop the younger students’ confidence, sense of belonging, and higher-order thinking skills. At the same time or in special groups, the younger participants are encouraged to learn the helping ways of socialization, communication, and safety.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Health
Sexual identity

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of individuals without a usual source of care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Ethnic and racial groups, Families

Related Program

Camp Sunnyside

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students receiving information on suicide

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships, Young adults, Adolescents, Preteens, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Camp Sunnyside

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of community-based organizations providing primary prevention services in physical activity

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Camp Sunnyside

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, People with disabilities, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients who report feeling less isolated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Caregivers, Families, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of support groups offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goals at Sunnyside are four fold: 1. To promote behavioral health and wellness through educational empowerment opportunities in association with the Fjord Horse; 2. To provide impactful and educational equine experiences for those who are socially, emotionally, mentally and physically challenged in life; 3. To create awareness and education for the breed and promote their vitality in equine-assisted therapy; and, 4. To produce a continual source of superior Fjord Horses suitable for therapeutic use.

The legacy of Sunnyside Farms will be that the challenges, anxiety and depression of each individual who visits the farm are left at the gate as their inhibitions, aspirations and dreams are faced, met and conquered leaving each person at peace within and hungry for their next experience at the farm.

Each season, we observe and accommodate the behavioral health needs of kids in SW Montana. Our varied programs are often fluid and can be adjusted to accommodate every speed and individual need. While we strive to help as many people as possible, it is never enough. If we can help one youth from ending their life or committing a crime that affects people around them, we have made a difference. Our cardinal belief is that every single soul counts. By helping one soul, we help their schoolmates, friends and family. Helping their schoolmates, friends and family helps the community as a whole. Suddenly, the wellness of one individual relates to a healthy community.

By collaborating with other organizations and using the skills and talents of various individuals, our ability to help can be more wide-ranging. We continually seek relations with those who have like-minded goals and inhibitions while also developing new connections with alternative forms of creative outlets and resources. In the end, teamwork makes the dreams work.

Up to now, we have had great experience with guest leaders for children’s camps, special events and retreats, and creative productions for outreach online. Our partnership plan is to build close working relations with the schools, private counselors, holistic healthcare providers and organizations such as: the Yellowstone Boys and Girls Ranch, Youth Dynamics, L’Esprit, Aspen, the Livingston Food Network, Live Well 49, the AB Wilderness Foundation, the Bozeman Art Museum, the and Bozeman Symphony. Together, we will join forces to bring out the best of creativity, hard work, mentoring, responsibility, accountability, commitment, and practice so that kids can thrive and not be discouraged.

At Sunnyside Farms, we have the people, the environment and animals to foster long-term systemic changes in the lives of the kids in our community. By providing empowerment opportunities that offer long term help for these kids in a safe and enriching environment, they can thrive and find hope in the future.

Youth in our Leader-in-Learning program experience a myriad of the following: physical and mental wellness through working at the farm; a safe and supportive environment; opportunities for connectedness to individuals, community, and positive social interactions; and development of problem solving skills. It is amazing what a little grit and involvement on the farm can do to kids that then become leaders and help our community as a whole.

In 2018, the nonprofit published Soulshine, a beautifully illustrated educational book for children. In 2019, this became a living story for children visiting the farm, where they could read and share the book with their older peer tutors - and meet the horses in person. It has proved to help build openness, understanding and optimism among the youth in our community.

In 2020, Sunnyside welcomed our sixth resident intern and also our first Junior Intern to the farm. We are excited about how their future will grow with the experiences that they encountered. Our interns are enabled to further their own talents and vocational goals while working at the farm. They gain skills in all aspects of nonprofit tasks, farm work, building projects, program development and relationship building, which contribute to lifetimes of personal enrichment.

We are also proud to have not only survived a pandemic, but to have flourished in the midst of it. COVID forced us to think outside the box and because many people couldn’t come to us, we went to them. Every Wednesday throughout the summer we aired our educational “Sunnyside Live” program, which is available on our Youtube channel.

Sunnyside’s best multi-year achievement is in our Leader-in-Learning program. Kids at-risk take on important roles, have responsibilities and are held accountable. They develop skills and confidence that bring them out of depression and feelings of anxiety, giving them purpose and identity. Our mentor process allows for youth empowerment and mindfulness in ways that develop sense of self-worth and importance that many of them would not realize on their own.

Youth get to know that it is possible to choose a better path through their time at Sunnyside. Family members and older generations are drawn into the process as volunteers, growing the program into a grass-roots Rural Community Wellness Center.

Sunnyside Farms strives to continue to meet the needs of people-at-risk in our community. We are here for them and will sustain a positive, peaceful environment where folks of all ages can come to experience empowerment, happiness, hopefulness and peace within.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Sunnyside Farms serves people at risk within our rural Southwestern Montana community. This includes all races, genders and ages of individuals of varied socio-economic backgrounds, disabilities, and education.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Sunnyside farms recently incorporated journal keeping and sharing with the youth in our Leader-in-Learning program.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Because our outcomes are positive, people are happy to share their feedback. It makes them feel more involved and shifts our decisions more towards what would continue to attract more participants and help them even further.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Sunnyside Farms Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Sunnyside Farms Inc

Board of directors
as of 01/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Wendy Bauwens

Sunnyside Farms, Inc.

Term: 2016 -

Jeanne Bauwens

Sunnyside Farms, Inc.

Chris Siegle

Sunnyside Farms, Inc.

Cori Trout

Sunnyside Farms, Inc.

Jeanna Butterfield

Sunnyside Farms, Inc.

Carolyn Long

Sunnyside Farms, Inc.

Patrick Dahman

Sunnyside Farms, Inc.

Holly Kruger

Sunnyside Farms, Inc.

Kim Voller

Sunnyside Farms, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/13/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.