PLATINUM2023

Vision Quilt

Together We Can Prevent Gun Violence

Portland, OR   |  www.visionquilt.org

Mission

Vision Quilt empowers communities to create their own solutions to gun violence through the power of art and inclusive dialogue.

Ruling year info

2016

Founder and Executive Director

Dr. Cathy DeForest

Main address

1125 NW 12th Ave. #207

Portland, OR 97209 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-3482436

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2019.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gun violence is a major public health issue in the United States. While public attention is focused primarily on mass shootings, over 33,000 people die each year from firearm injuries in the United States. At Vision Quilt we are particularly concerned with the impact of gun violence on children and teens. Gun violence (both homicide and suicide) is the third leading cause of death for children under the age of 17. Children of color experience gun violence 4 to 7 times more often than white children. From 2010 through 2012, more than 15,000 children ages 0-19 were treated for gun related injuries. The mental health impact on children throughout the U.S. who now endure "active shooter" drills cannot be over estimated. As a country, we need to find ways to heal, to come together to find solutions which fit our communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Panel-Making

Vision Quilt programs are tailored to the needs and interests of each requesting agency and include educational, artistic, and interactive components. Programs are conducted in schools, community centers, churches, stores, homeless shelters and centers for incarcerated youth. Panel making is a form of visual storytelling and has had tremendous impact for survivors, gun owners, students, and community members to open a dialogue around gun violence, share their experiences, and to envision a more peaceful future.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Multiracial people

Vision Quilt encourages communities to exhibit Vision Quilt panels made in their community to amplify the voices of the community and inspire conversations around issues related to gun violence. Vision Quilt has been featured in national art exhibitions, quilting magazines, local news and radio, violence prevention organizations, public health institutions, libraries, schools and art galleries. Panels are often displayed or worn in rallies, vigils and marches to elevate courage, compassion, communication, and resilience in communities. All panels are displayed in the digital, publicly accessible National Vision Quilt on the Vision Quilt website.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Multiracial people

Vision Quilt inspires young people to lead us toward a future without gun violence. Vision Quilt offers training to youth leaders interested in facilitating Vision Quilt programs, exhibitions and Community Conversations in their schools and communities.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

A three month curriculum is available for middle and high school students based on programs developed with Lighthouse Community Charter School in Oakland, California, and Vision Quilt. Students can research gun violence through their humanities and math classes. Vision Quilt panels highlighting students' personal experiences of living in communities heavily impacted by gun violence and their visions for a safer future are created. An interactive exhibition curated and hosted by 7th and 8th grade students is the culmination of this work. Community members are invited to learn from the students and participate in Community Conversations about how to prevent gun violence in their community.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Multiracial people

Vision Quilt works with local and national community centers, gun violence prevention organizations, hospitals, faith based organizations, veteran organizations, and social movements to build coalitions resulting in greater impact through education and inclusive dialogue.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Activists

Where we work

Awards

Best Violence Healing Project 2019

Oakland Magazine

Warriors for Peace Award 2019

Soldiers Against Violence Everywhere

Peacemaker Award 2019

Peace House

Affiliations & memberships

John Legend and National Writing Project Innovation Award 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, At-risk youth

Related Program

Exhibitions/Community Conversations

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Between 2015-2019, 87% of participants rated program as good or excellent.

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, At-risk youth

Related Program

Community Panel-Making

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Community events 2015-2019 were attended by 1275+ participants. To meet 2020 pandemic challenges, we provided art kits to 500 students and hosted youth-led conferences attended by 1,000 people.

Total number of exhibitions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, At-risk youth

Related Program

Exhibitions/Community Conversations

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

11,575+ people attended these exhibitions and Community Conversations.

Number of evaluations conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, At-risk youth

Related Program

Community Panel-Making

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2019, we piloted new in-depth evaluation metrics: 92% increased knowledge as a result of participation in our programs; 88% took action to prevent gun violence in their family or community.

Number of groups brought together in a coalition/alliance/partnership

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, At-risk youth

Related Program

Coalition Building on Local and National Level

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

152 organizations received our programing from 2015-2019.

Total number of works exhibited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, At-risk youth

Related Program

Coalition Building on Local and National Level

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Totals include digital media, exhibitions, and in print.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Coalition Building on Local and National Level

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteers include survivors, at-risk youth, doctors, community organizers, artists, gun owners, teachers, social workers, and veterans.

Number of curricula designed for specific organizations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, At-risk youth

Related Program

Youth Empowerment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Custom designed programs for incarcerated youth, incarcerated adults, restorative justice programs, homeless youth, survivors, students in violence-impacted communities, and K-College.

Percentage of participants who stated their intention to act to prevent gun violence within their family, school and/or community.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Youth Empowerment

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of individuals in the target audience that expresses intent to adopt (or continue) desired behavior

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, At-risk youth

Related Program

Youth Empowerment

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2019, 90% of at-risk youth stated they would take action to intervene when someone is being bullied or hurt. Total number of evaluations was lower due to piloting new metric tools in 2019.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our ultimate goal is to eradicate gun violence as a public health threat in the United States. Our near-term goal is to assist organizations and schools focused on reducing gun violence. We provide unique, non-partisan programming which leverages the impact of partner organizations through the power of art and inclusive dialogue.
Priority goals are to:
* Expand our capacity to meet all requests for programming from schools and community organizations. Demand currently exceeds our capacity.
* Train teams of youth, survivors and community leaders to lead Vision Quilt programs
* Promote exhibitions and Community Conversations that lead to action planning on local level to prevent gun violence
* Be powered by a strong decentralized infrastructure to serve communities nationwide either through regional or national partnerships
* Create an Endowment Fund to provide a foundation for future sustainability.

Vision Quilt uses a public health approach, assisting community organizations in five strategic ways: programs, curriculum, exhibitions, training, and Community Conversations.
*VQ programs are tailored to the needs and interests of each requesting agency. Duration may last from three hours to five months.
*VQ offers curricula addressing gun violence for a variety of educational settings, including preschool through college classrooms.
*Panels are exhibited at the local, regional and national level in schools, libraries, museums. A Virtual Vision Quilt is posted on our website: www.visionquilt.org.
*Training: Following a decentralized model for geographic expansion, Vision Quilt trains managers, staff and volunteers of partner organizations to deliver Vision Quilt programs within their organizations.
* “Community Conversations”​ ​are facilitated meetings of key local stakeholders whose goal is to generate strategies for reducing gun violence in their specific community.

Our core team consists of three Ph.D. professionals, one pediatrician and one MFA artist/educator whose expertise encompasses business administration, art education, child development, strategic planning, program evaluation, and grant writing. All members of this team serve in pro-bono capacity, allowing us to devote most of our budget to programming. We have a dynamic Advisory Council comprised of youth and adult leaders from diverse racial backgrounds that represent expertise from the communities we serve. In addition, we currently have one part time, paid staff member and a large volunteer base composed of doctors, teachers, nurses, social workers, artists and survivors. We have developed partnerships across the nation with hospitals, libraries, schools, violence interruption organizations, and various coalitions working together to raise awareness on issues of gun violence. Our partnerships have helped us develop curricula for at-risk youth. When budget constraints limit travel, VQ educational tool kits and coaching by phone and virtual meetings are available nationwide. This cost-saving approach has already proven successful in NV, AZ, MO and NY.

Since our inception in 2015, over 1,000 participants from 104 different organizations have participated in our programs in 7 states and the District of Columbia. We have developed VQ programs for specific audiences: K- 12 school youth, survivors, teachers, families, incarcerated youth, public health educators, artists, gun owners, veterans, and homeless youth. Evaluations of these programs are consistently positive. We conducted one 6-month follow-up survey of impact on participants. We have multiplied our outreach capacity by creating educational tool kits, available on our website and accompanied by coaching and virtual meetings when requested. Our VQ website was built to share community resources including videos, Virtual Quilt & downloadable curricula materials. www.visionquilt.org. We have held 130 exhibitions and community events since 2015 seen by 11,575 people.
We post images on social media channels: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.
We hope to increase funding to train people nationwide and disseminate our training materials.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Vision Quilt
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Vision Quilt

Board of directors
as of 05/30/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cathy DeForest, Ph.D.

Vision Quilt

Term: 2015 -

Leon Pyle, Ph.D.

Friends of Senegal Executive Director

Cathy DeForest Ph.D.

Vision Quilt

Herb Rothschild Ph.D.

Peace House

Chloe Armstead

VQ Advisory Board

Allen Carr, MBA

Broadstone Regional Vice President

Julia Cordover

VQ Advisory Board

Melvin Cowan, MPA

BOSS Deputy Director

Karen Fee, M.Ed

Lighthouse Community Charter School Development Director

Jeremy Fish, MD ​

John Muir Family Medicine UCSF Residency Director

Michelle La Place-Watts, MA, LMF

Crisis Response and Support Network Manager Catholic Charities

Gracie Pekrul

VQ Advisory Board

Michelle Fitch, M.Ed.

Board Member, Learning Specialist

Nidya Baez, M.Ed.

Board Member, Principal Fremont High School , Oakland CA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/30/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/21/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.