Friends of the Children - SF Bay Area

Generational Change: One Child At A TIme

aka FOTC-SF   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.friendssfbayarea.org

Mission

We empower the children facing the biggest obstacles to break the generational cycle of poverty by providing a salaried, professional mentor to walk beside them from kindergarten through high school graduation.

Ruling year info

2016

Executive Director

Michael Rugen

Main address

111 Quint

San Francisco, CA 94124 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-3921100

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We confront a deep-seated, long-term social problem that few other organizations address -- multi-generational poverty. We do not wait for a parent or caretaker to come and ask for a mentor. We do not seek high-achieving children from underserved communities. Instead, we actively search for and enroll the children who face the biggest obstacles, those most at risk of dropping out of school, having children in their teens and/or becoming ensnared in the justice system. Our children's families typically struggle with challenges such as institutional racism, unresponsive systems, homelessness, domestic violence, parental incarceration and/or substance abuse. All live below the poverty line, most in single caregiver homes and many in foster or family care. With the added support provided by our long-term mentors, our children can and do break the generational cycles into which they were born.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Friends of the Children - SF Bay Area

Friends of the Children – SF Bay Area (Friends-SF) is a chapter of a nationwide organization dedicated to breaking the cycle of generational poverty through long-term, professional mentoring. Our mentors walk beside each child from kindergarten through high school graduation, providing the caring, consistent adult support that every child deserves.

The national organization was founded in 1993 and the San Francisco chapter started serving children in 2017. We serve children who live in and around the Bayview Hunters Point community, we are adding a new class of kindergarteners each year, and we will eventually serve 500 children.

Our mentoring model is simple yet radical.

** We proactively search for and enroll the children who face the biggest obstacles to living a successful and satisfying life.

** We start early and commit to each child for the long term, from kindergarten through high school graduation – 12-1/2 years, no matter what!

** Our mentors are trained, full-time professionals -- not volunteers -- each of whom is paired with eight children.

** We measure, assess and adjust at every turn, creating an individualized plan for each child, recording the work our mentors do each day, tracking the child's development, and adjusting our services accordingly.

We have come a long way since we opened our doors in 2017. We will soon be serving over 100 Bayview Hunters Point children, well on the way to serving 500. Most important, our children are thriving, and our families and schools are actively supporting our program.

Research and third-party evaluation demonstrate that the Friends model works. Over its 25-year history, graduates of the Friends of the Children program have achieved the following outcomes:

** 83% of our youth graduated from high school (60% have at least one parent who did not have the support they needed to complete school)

** 93% of our children avoided the juvenile justice system (50% have at least one parent who was incarcerated)

** 98% of our children avoided early parenting (85% were born to a teen parent)

** 92% enrolled in a post-secondary program, obtained full-time employment or enlisted to serve our country.

The Harvard Business School Alumni Association conducted an ROI study and concluded that every $1 invested in Friends of the Children yields more than $7 of benefit to the community. In other words, helping one child graduate from our program saves the community nearly $1million dollars.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who model positive behaviors for peers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Friends of the Children - SF Bay Area

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed social skills (e.g., interpersonal communication, conflict resolution)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed positive values

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed positive relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed healthy relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed coping skills

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We serve children living in the poorest, most underserved communities in San Francisco -- Bayview Hunters Point, Potrero Hill and Visitation Valley. Approximately 50% of our children are African American, 40% Latino and 10% Asian or Pacific Islander. In the midst of America's most vibrant economy, our children face immense economic and societal obstacles.

Our goal is to help each of those children overcome those obstacles and go on to live productive, satisfying lives. Friends of the Children has 25 years of independently documented results demonstrating that our graduates can and will break the generational cycle of poverty.

Beyond changing the life trajectory of each individual child, we look to support our children's communities. For example, we enroll as many children as possible who live in public housing because concentrating our services in those small, highly challenged communities will inevitably have positive ripple effects for all residents of the communities. Likewise, our school partners tell us that, by working with their most challenging students and by helping school personnel connect with families who were previously less involved in their children's education, our mentors improve the functioning of the entire school.

We invest heavily in each child because the obstacles they face are immense, the value of each life is immeasurable and the benefits to society are immense.

Our model is distinct, courageous and proven. We have redefined the youth mentoring field by creating the first and only long-term professional mentoring program in the country. Our Friends are experts in building sustained and nurturing relationships with youth. We specialize in working with youth who have faced a lot of adversity. We have the data to show that it's real and it works.

Our model was founded on research showing that the single most important factor in overcoming childhood adversity is a long-term, nurturing relationship with a consistent and caring adult. Research over the past three decades continues to affirm how much these relationships matter.

Our trauma-informed, long-term mentoring model is now being sought after by communities and systems around the country and the world. They recognize that children who've experienced a lot of adversity need more specialized and long-term mentoring relationships that Friends of the Children–San Francisco provides.

We proactively identify and enroll only the children facing the greatest barriers to success. We pair each child with a professional – not volunteer – mentor, whose full-time job is to spend 16 hours per month supporting each of eight children. We commit to stay with each child from kindergarten through high school graduation – 12-1/2 years, no matter what! We apply a rigorous, evidence-based approach at every stage, monitoring each child's progress, and adjusting our approach accordingly.

We use multiple intermediary indicators over the course of the 12 year commitment to track the progress of our youth. 92% of youth go on to enroll in post-secondary education, serve our country or enter the workforce.83% of youth earn a high school diploma or GED. 93% of youth remain free from juvenile justice system involvement. 98% of youth wait to parent until after their teen years.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Friends of the Children - SF Bay Area
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Friends of the Children - SF Bay Area

Board of directors
as of 08/04/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Abhi Talwalkar

Greg Vilkin

Cecil Williams

Ruth Bond

Dion-Jay Brookter

Rene Durazzo

Ruth Bond

Jason DiLullo

Gary Gates

Robert House

William Jeffrey

Bev Scott

Seema Shah

Tanya Welch

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/25/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.