Dementia Together

Living well with dementia

aka DEMENTIA TOGETHER   |   Windsor, CO   |  http://www.dementiatogether.org

Mission

To create communities in which no one walking the dementia journey has to walk alone.

Notes from the nonprofit

Our MISSION To create communities in which no one has to walk the dementia journey alone. Our VISION “Living well with dementia” is the expectation, not the exception. Our VALUES Excellence, integrity, kindness, courage, humility, trust, and joy Our PILLARS Education Enrichment Hope Our MESSAGING The dementia journey can be overwhelming, but no one has to walk it alone. At DEMENTIA TOGETHER, we cultivate joy while building stronger connections for those living with dementia, their care partners, and the community. Through education and enrichment, we make living well with dementia the expectation, not the exception. We lead and support innovative efforts to enhance well-being and hope. For our friends living with dementia, their hope may not be in a future cure. It's in the current care. We are an "in the meantime" organization. "In the meantime," until cures for the various causes of dementia are found, we help people care well so those living with dementia can live well.

Ruling year info

2017

Executive Director

Cyndy Luzinski

Main address

1540 Main St Ste 218/231

Windsor, CO 80550 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-4275360

NTEE code info

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

5-7 million people are living with some form of dementia, a number expected to rise with our aging population. Almost 1 in 4 people in the work force serve as caregivers for loved ones. Even before the pandemic, two-thirds of care partners reported suffering with depression. Care partners for people living with dementia are twice as likely as other care partners to experience depression. The US is investing >$2 billion in treatments and "cures" for dementia. Very little is spent nationally or locally on "in the meantime" approaches for combating the unnecessary stigma and fear of dementia and the social isolation that occurs with any dementia-related diagnosis. The education, enrichment, and hope we provide to individuals and the community is often described as life-changing. The tragedy narrative around dementia needs to be challenged, and is challenged as we help people discover there is a lot of living to do and joy to be shared even when dementia is part of the life journey.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Memory Cafe

Memory Cafés are social gatherings for people with mild to moderate cognitive impairment AND their care partners who want to remain engaged with others traveling the dementia journey. Memory Cafés show that there is a lot of joyful living to do even when dementia is part of the journey.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Where we work

Accreditations

Finalist of BBB Torch Award for Ethics 2023

Affiliations & memberships

BBB 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of classes offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Caregivers, Emergency responders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors, Caregivers, Widows and widowers

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors, Caregivers, Emergency responders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who self-report increased skills/knowledge after educational program/intervention

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Older adults, Caregivers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

98-99% of clients have reported increased knowledge after participating in our education.

Number of participants counseled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Older adults, Seniors

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors, Young adults, Caregivers, Widows and widowers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who would recommend program to others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors, Caregivers, Widows and widowers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100% of our participants report they would recommend our program(s) to others.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors, Caregivers

Related Program

Memory Cafe

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors, Caregivers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Starting in early 2020, during the pandemic and lockdown we started buying meals from local restaurants and volunteers handed them out to our participants to let them know they are not forgotten.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

PUBLIC MESSAGING
The dementia journey can be overwhelming, but no one has to walk it alone. At DEMENTIA TOGETHER, we cultivate joy while building stronger connections for those living with dementia, their care partners, and the community. Through education and enrichment, we make living well with dementia the expectation, not the exception. We lead and support innovative efforts to enhance well-being and hope.

GOALS
• To listen to the experts (the people living with dementia.)
• To increase dementia awareness in the community
• To provide life enrichment opportunities for people living with dementia and their care partners
• To provide care partner support and education
• To work with others to eliminate the stigma around dementia
• To work with others in our community to promote a high standard of dementia care
• To empower those who give care to realize how powerfully their interactions impact contentment and lifelong well-being for those living with dementia

Actual measurable goals are included in the LOGIC model evaluation which we are in the process of completing and are not publishing in detail until completed. In the meantime, a summary of recent evidence-based research is included in the GuideStar documentation as is our 2021 annual report. In 2022, we have served over 1700 people with more than 700 educational and life enrichment sessions, receiving consistent survey responses that our programming offers relief, hope, and a sense of connection for people living with dementia, their care partners, and those in the community who are learning that living well with dementia is entirely possible. Together we are changing the narrative of dementia from tragedy to contentment.

Provide education for care partners, professionals, community members using the Contented Dementia framework, a simple, person-centered, family-driven disability management model out of the UK which helps people work positively with the dementia and enables those experiencing dementia and their care partners to live well. This education results in reported confidence and well-being for participants and ultimately leads to culture change of the narrative around dementia from one of tragedy to one of contentment.

Provide life enrichment opportunities which result in a sense of connection, community engagement, discovery that joy is still possible even with a dementia-related diagnosis, and hope that as anyone interacting with someone living with dementia, we can make a difference and positive impact for anyone on the dementia journey.

We do not charge for any of our programming so that cost is not a barrier to finding connection and support. We rely on private donations, corporate sponsors, and grants to enable us to sustain and grow our programming to meet the needs.

We have a dedicated staff of 4, contracted positions for strategic infrastructure and innovative operations management, an engaged board of 11, a collaborative, supportive community, with relationships that continue to grow as our impact grows to make "living well with dementia" the expectation, not the exception. Our revenue sources continue to expand and we benefit from diverse funding from private donors, corporate sponsors, and grants and foundations.

We participate in evidence-based research related the Contented Dementia education we provide. We have served over 1700 people with more than 700 gatherings (education and enrichment--in-person and online) including Contented Dementia classes, workshops, support groups, and consultations, memory cafes, mobile memory cafes in care communities, social luncheons, and SPECAL (pronounced "speckle") Sports (pool, golf, and bowling). We provided 300 patient resource folders in Northern CO to family medicine, internal medicine, and neurology medical providers to share with patients being assessed for cognitive changes. This has resulted in new people showing up to our programs each week due to hearing about us at their medical appointments. We also continue to expand our outreach and awareness within our communities locally and in 31 states online.

We are strategically and methodically developing more rigorous evaluation mechanisms and growing our staff in order to expand programming to meet the demand for our services. We see nothing but growth and potential for growth and will continue as an "in the meantime" collaborative organization offering tangible hope, practical strategies, and joyful connection for all of our participants.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve people living with dementia, care partners, all family involved, community members, care community staff, home health staff, senior care and health care professionals

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    At our Memory Cafes, we received feedback that people would like more time to chat with one another during this time so at the next Memory Cafe we rearranged tables and gave time for our participants to chat with and get to know one another instead of maintaining the structured program until the end of the gathering.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We practice the "nothing about us without us" philosophy. Our advisory board is comprised of 4 couples who are themselves walking the dementia journey (living with dementia or serving as a care partner). They inform and advise our programming. Our participants consistently report that they feel seen and heard with us and their other friends involved in Dementia Together.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Dementia Together
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Dementia Together

Board of directors
as of 11/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Elisabeth Olson

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/7/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/07/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.