PLATINUM2024

Kenyan Schools of Hope

Safety.Hope.Education.

Spring, TX   |  https://kenyanschoolsofhope.org/

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Mission

Kenyan Schools of Hope offers refuge for Kenyan girls fleeing Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and Forced Early Marriage (FEM) in their homes of origin. We believe every child should have a place to feel safe, be loved, and have the opportunity to reach their God-given potential.

Ruling year info

2017

Chairman

Richard Lynch

Co Principal Officer

Pamela Rice

Main address

5201 Spring Cypress Rd

Spring, TX 77379 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-4314293

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

It is estimated that 70% of young Maasai girls still undergo female genital mutilation, even though it is prohibited by law. In addition, forced early marriage almost always results in ending a young girl's educational opportunities before she reaches her teens.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Ewaso Osiligi Center

Ewaso Osiligi Center is a rescue center for girls fleeing FGM and FEM. A beautiful, spacious dormitory on 12 acres in Ewuaso-Kedong has the capacity to shelter 120 girls from danger. Kenyan Schools of Hope is proud to be supporting this licensed center through construction funds and sponsorships for the rescued girls.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents

The Osiligi School located on the Ewuaso Osiligi Rescue Center campus provides classroom instruction for grades preschool through Junior Secondary School. Residents of the Center who have completed their education on campus and are eligible to enter high school continue to be sponsored and are placed in boarding arrangements at qualifying Secondary Schools to further their education. Last spring, 16 8th-graders not only passed the national exam, but Osiligi School had the highest scores in the region. This accomplishment is particularly impressive given that the Kenyan government condensed almost three years of school into one year to make up for all the time missed during the pandemic.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Tribal and indigenous religious groups

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students who perform at average or above on standardized testing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Osiligi Lutheran School

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Students must sit for a national entrance exam in order to be accepted into secondary school. This metric measures the program's success rate in students passing the exam and gaining entrance.

Number of stakeholders/stakeholder groups with whom communication has been achieved and expectations shared

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Children and youth

Related Program

Ewaso Osiligi Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric measures growth in our contact base.

Number of funding streams, such as donations, grants, or an endowment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Ewaso Osiligi Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Kenyan Schools of Hope will provide a residential setting for girls who must escape their homes to avoid female genital mutilation and forced early marriage. Girls and young women will be provided a safe, secure and loving home. An onsite school will provide education to the young ladies. Students will gain awareness of their basic human rights, illiteracy and poverty will be reduced.

Through contributions made to a Community Based Organization registered in the Republic of Kenya, we have provided funds to purchase land, build infrastructure on the property, construct a 120 student dormitory, and are in the process of funding six classrooms and a libray/technology center.

Our previous and ongoing vision clinic mission work through the Kenyan Ministry of Health, has allowed us the opportunity to build relationships spanning ten years with Kenyan citizens. Their participation in this endeavor, as board members of the rescue center and future school, has allowed us to accomplish much in a short period of time.

Our board of directors is deeply committed to the success of this project. Board members have expertise in international business, construction, education and fundraising.

Our previous and ongoing vision clinic mission work through the Kenyan Ministry of Health, has allowed us the opportunity to build relationships spanning ten years with Kenyan citizens. Their participation in this endeavor, as board members of the rescue center and future school, has allowed us to accomplish much in a short period of time.

Provided contributions that allowed the Community Based Organization to:
Purchased 12 acres of land in Ewaso Kedong
Completed construction of a 3-story dormitory, with room for over 120 residents
Completed water line, fencing, guard shack, bathroom facilities
Completed construction on six-room classroom block
Completed construction on perimeter fencing to secure the property
Completed installation of electrical service and back up generator
Provided community education to help eradicate the harmful tradition of female genital mutilation
Fully staffed with Headmaster, teachers, social worker, and support staff

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Kenyan Schools of Hope
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Kenyan Schools of Hope

Board of directors
as of 01/22/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Richard Lynch

Kenyan Schools of Hope

Term: 2023 - 2026


Board co-chair

Pamela Rice

Kenyan Schools of Hope

Term: 2023 - 2026

Jeanne M. Carmichael

Treasurer

Flora Tacquard

Director

Richard Lynch

Chairman

Marilyn Lynch

Director

Eric Walker

Director

Luis Sanabria

Director

Rosemary Freeman

Director

Doug Grove

Director

Bill Brunkhorst

Director

Kelly Borchelt

Director

Pam Rice

Co-chairman

Gloria Sauck

Director

Ray Tacquard

Chairman-emeritus

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/22/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/01/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.