Stellas Girls Inc

Educate. Empower. Lead.

Hughesville, MD   |  stellasgirls.org

Mission

Stella's Girls mission is to educate and empower young girls and women to become leaders, advocates, and social change agents in their communities where there is no presence of women.

Ruling year info

2017

Founder/C.E.O.

Mrs. D' Yana Kaprece James

Main address

7455 Sandy Bottom Ct

Hughesville, MD 20637 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-4402162

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Women's Rights (R24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We are striving to change the current education and leadership situation for girls in Liberia. Currently on 20% of girls in the country attend school and we would like to increase that by 80% by 2030. We hope by providing school fees and school supplies along with educational and leadership training that we will be able to accomplish this goal. Continue to increase one-to-one matches for rural youth in Southern Maryland. We hope to recruit 300 mentees with 150 mentors by June 2022.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Stella's Girls Club

Stella's Girls Club focuses on AmerAsian students at the AmerAsian School of Okinawa between the ages of 6-10. This club is to empower the girls to embrace both of their cultures and to embrace their identities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People of Asian descent

SG Institute focuses on AmerAsian girls between the ages of 10-16 at the AmerAsiand School of Okinawa. We focus on vocational, education, and professional opportunities. We also encourage and support girls with passing their entrance exams into high school.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Students

Provide mentoring to young women and girls to instill personal and professional development. Participants are provided with a mentor and will complete several phases to ensure the mentee is rounded in many different aspects of her life.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Providing leadership and educational opportunities for girls and women in Liberia. Teach reproductive health and how to make reusable pads for 1 year.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National Partnership with Girls Not Brides 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Adolescents, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Maryland Chapter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of children we have provided access to education or have utilized our programs to enhance their education development.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Liberia Chapter

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Maryland Chapter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of youth we have trained through out leadership programs.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To increase girls enrollment in school by 2030 to 80 percent. To increase access to leadership opportunities to girls by 30 percent by 2025. To help join the fight to end violence against girls and women by 2030. To increase women entrepreneurs by 80 percent by 2030

Partnering with local charitable organizations to increase opportunities for girls. Providing mentorship programs for girls in all of our locations. Raising funds for girls in Liberia and Sierra Leone for education. Developing training for leadership and educational opportunities for girls and women in our locations.

We have over 40 volunteers on the ground that are directed by 3 Chapter Directors and a 10 National Headquarters Staff.

We have already reached 5,000 women and girls on a budget of 10k for 3 years and have now hit an annual operating budget of 50K over the last 2 years.

We have formulated 5 programs in Maryland, Okinawa, Rwanda, Uganda, and Liberia. Our programs include mentoring, STEAM activities, leadership development, coaching, and workshops. In Uganda, we support a reading program that teaches young girls to read that do not attend school.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We collect feedback from the youth we serve in each of our programs.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We moved our Mentoring Program to a Peer Mentoring model to meet the needs of middle school students.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Provided more connection to the work we are doing in the community.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Stellas Girls Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Stellas Girls Inc

Board of directors
as of 6/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Kaprece James


Board co-chair

Shantrell Calvy-Holloman

Walter Reed National Naval Medical Center

Term: 2016 - 2021

Estuko Frankin

Lia Bella

Selenia Hawkins

Leslie Lee

The TLC Foundation

Leslia Gaines

BGE Company

Charise Liggins

SassyChicGeek

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/07/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/08/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.